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  1. Hey All - I can confirm we will definitely be making coils and release will be in first half of 2022. Coiltek Quality - Fully Minelab Approved and no need to break a coil to make a coil. We will be releasing more info on this in the coming months. Stay safe everyone. Trevor.
  2. I was pretty excited about this one so I couldn't resist posting the video of it, it's a 12x6" prototype test coil being used on the GPX 6000 to find gold, it found 3 bits on it's first run. This was one of my favourite coils on the older model GPX and if I end up with the new GPX it will be a size I'd have to have. It's long sensitive nose was great getting up between the rocks I regularly hunt in. This is purely for information for those interested in following the progress of the coils. These coils are not being sold by them yet, it's in a testing stage and they will require an adapter which involves removing a chip from the original coil. You'll see in the photo the adapter inline on the coil cable which has the chip in it that was removed from the standard mono coil. And the video The 3 bits of gold found while testing it. The one to the left was the one found in the video.
  3. Not sure where to post this but Steve can move it if necessary: I've been wandering central Victoria for the last two weeks with this proto 22" Z X Coil concentric and results are impressive, to say the least. I've picked up deep bits missed by all the current detectors including GPX's, GPZ's (with standard coils) SDC's and QED's. I have personally walked over some of these bits: Some of the above were under 3KV power lines, which were worked two years ago for 1.5 ounces with QED's by Reg and myself. The Z concentric handled this well using full audio smoothing and picked up more pieces. This morning I tackled another well flogged patch and picked up an additional 5 grams: The day was hot and I ventured out once more and hit on this 11.8 grammer at depth. Took me half an hour to crowbar it out at only 14" The ground here is like concrete atm. In brief, this coil is a killer and has found gold (or missed deep targets) on all the well flogged areas I have worked so far. Settings: HY Normal, Max gain and no threshold (Bogenes) Same as what I always use on the 5000. "Difficult" is a small target killer on the Z. Many times I have changed to Difficult from Normal only to lose the target signal completely. I have detected below .1 of a gram at 4" using my settings. Not bad for a 22" coil. Audio smoothing only under power lines. Salt could be a problem so not looking forward to the heavy rain forecast here next week. On the other hand, digging will be much easier!
  4. Here is a video of the GPX 6000 running a 15x10" X-coil, a test over a little nugget.
  5. I haven't done a story on a gold find for a while, partly because once you find a patch with a bunch of nuggets everything else seems pretty insignificant, a couple of months ago I did just that, it's only my second patch but had quite a number of nuggets, I'd guess at least 40 (Correction: at least 80 nuggets) and over 30 grams in total. I lost count of both the nuggets and the grams we got out of it in the end. I did take a couple of videos on the first and second day of it, after that I stopped filming and just worried about detecting as filming videos is very time consuming and wastes valuable detecting time πŸ™‚ That patch has been the highlight of my detecting time and hopefully I can find another in the future, I'll put links to the videos for anyone that wants to watch them and hasn't seen them already. https://youtu.be/qs-e8HO7xdU https://youtu.be/tppU5XZe77o Now to the more recent adventure, one of the most common gold spots I've been to is being developed, very soon it will no longer exist, already a large area of it has disappeared over the past few months with more to go yet, seeing it's probably the closest gold spot to home and one I've found a reasonable amount of gold before so it will be missed greatly. It's obviously getting extremely hard to find gold there as it's not a huge area really and it's been done a lot over the years by a number of people being an obvious spot to look. My focus on this day was to take advantage of how well the GPZ and Concentric coil handles EMI to hunt almost exclusive in and around the power lines where people including myself with previous setups were unable to really detect very well, especially with my GPX 4500, it was terrible near the power lines, and what inspired me to try out a QED which ended up working quite well under the power lines but just didn't have the power of the GPZ. I didn't take all that many photos as my aim was to get some video, I always struggle to get gold finds on video as I just use my phone to film and I have to put it down to do the recovery πŸ™‚ I have a GoPro but just haven't bothered to use it yet. I went to some bedrock and worked my way up digging every signal and recording and deleting all the recordings as they were turning out to be shotgun pellets, this is entirely normal in this area as it has a big rabbit plague and shooters love spreading their pellets around all over the place for me to dig back up again. Here is a video of the first gold find, a .109 of a gram nugget, I was pretty happy with that to start the day as often at this location I go home empty handed. I didn't get the entire thing on video and I had my detector in difficult from when I was messing around the other day doing some testing and didn't check my settings, I'd never normally use difficult in my soil as Normal works just fine. Fortunately it didn't prevent me finding the gold, or the numerous pellets before it Once I'd finished that bedrock area I walked up under the power lines to detect hoping I'd find something others couldn't get, I took a little video there of how the detector was working under the lines, I really love how well the GPZ handles power lines seeing they're in many of my gold areas. You'll also notice at the end of the video the millions of bits of rabbit poo on the ground, this is the reason for the shotgun pellets everywhere. You'll notice in the video I discover I'm in difficult and seem a bit surprised, this is when I worked out I may have wasted the past hour detecting in difficult and it went through my head now I'll have to go check that bedrock again πŸ˜› I was quite happy at that point I took the video or I may not have noticed for the rest of the day. I started detecting along under the power lines and ended up in a little area I don't think I've been into before, I'm terrible with directions and locations so it's quite possible I have been there before and don't remember it but it didn't look familiar, I was still recording every target dig to try get a gold find on video and managed to do it, I think this might be my first time ever getting one from start to finish on video, quite happy with that. And a couple of photos of it. And my lucky last nugget of the day if you could call it that was a 0.038 of a gram nugget, very shallow on some bedrock, it took me about 20 minutes to recover this one, but I only got a portion of it on video, I kept moving it around but couldn't pick it up, I had no idea where it was in the cleared area, I was wishing I had a VLF with me with tiny coil to narrow it down. I'd imagine there are quite a lot of these little guys around it's just the amount of pellets you'd have to dig to find them would be crazy. I do it more for the challenge but the novelty wears off after digging a massive amount of pellets and not finding any nuggets and if you ignore the pellets you'll miss these little bits of gold. So here are the 3 little bits for the day and the weights All a bit of good fun, I really enjoy chasing these little bits especially after the first one pops up to get you into gear looking for more. I can't compete with the photos lately out of Alaska for gold though, I'm just glad I can do the hobby near home and find a few bits to keep me happy. Here is a little tour video of where I was detecting. Keep in mind to run these coils you need to have an adapter and that involves cutting the end off your existing GPZ coil and making an adapter out of it, it should only ever be taken on by someone very skilled at electronics or really the best thing to do is get a professional to make the adapter for you to avoid any problems.
  6. I wanted to clarify this, in case people are thinking x coil is not welcome here, due to some x coil related members leaving the forum. I support anyone or anything that legitimately extends our metal detecting capabilities. I applaud x coils efforts. What I did not like was the fact that you have to take a perfectly good coil, and use it to create an adapter. The process is not simple, and if done incorrectly can fry a GPZ 7000. The repair will cost thousands of dollars, and that is not an exaggeration. Further, there appears to be nobody who will make these for people, and warranty that if the work blows up the detector, that they will insure those costs. In others words β€œdo this at your own risk.” Seems simple to me. No drama, just β€œdo this at your own risk.” The knowledge of that risk was suppressed, and people who expressed concern were attacked and ridiculed. ANY mention of the risk was met with swift damage control that attempted to shout down the offending party. THAT is what I objected to. I’m a pragmatic facts based guy. I could care less about the adapter. I do care that it is something that should be a disclaimer on any β€œoh these are the greatest thing since sliced bread” coming from parties who received many thousands of dollars in free product. And I mean seriously, who actually buys x coils? Because from this dumb Alaskans perspective, nearly everyone reporting on x coils is sporting free coils. Are there people out there that have to buy your x coils? I’d like to know who those people are, and hear what they have to say. Even then, I’m surprised how little you can trust even reports from purchasers. I was under the impression from several people that the QED was a pretty good product. Now, the ex-dealer is revealing that they are in fact a crap shoot, with very poor reliability, and poor physical construction. The truth now seems 100% the opposite of what I was being told by people, including people who berate others for concealing things. I gave QED quite a bit of positive coverage here that I now regret, because the so-called honest reporting of purchasing owners turns out to be quite suspect. When people buy junk, they prefer to quietly move it along with little fuss. In the meantime, the rest of us are not getting a clear picture of the truth. The same thing was going on with the Impulse AQ testing. Parties experiencing issues are protective of the developers, kind of a Stockholm Syndrome thing, where you protect your abuser. Because, you know, maybe the next thing they do will be good, and would not want to get shut out of that! So relevant facts about issues that might be perceived as problematic are suppressed or hidden. I bailed out of the project over that. Anyway, back to X Coil. I just want to let people know discussion of them is welcome. What is not welcome is berating people for being concerned over the adapter. That should simply be the default position for wise people. β€œDo this at your own risk.” Concerned care, not panic. Second, since free coils rained down like crazy, it would be nice if reporters clearly identify themselves as people getting free gear. I’m serious. I’m truly an outside observer to all this nonsense, and there appear to be almost no people who report on x coil, that do not have at least one free x coil. So that’s my question. Is there anyone out there that is just a person that bought these, and made or paid someone to make an adapter? A straight up no question purchasing end user? If so, I’d sure like to hear from you!! If you have free coils, love to hear from you also, but please let us know the whole picture. And to mention one last time. Never did, still do not have any issue with x coil discussion. It’s ok to great product, exploring new ideas, and I thank them for that. It was all the skullduggery and drama that bothered me. I’d welcome sane discussion of the product, and if they ever make a coil for a GPX 6000, I’d be interested. https://www.x-coils.com
  7. I have been itching to try the 10" X Coil out in Nevada salt for almost 2 years now, but life has always prevented me from making it to Nevada until now. And luckily, I also now have an 8" to try as well, plus a 15" and 17" concentric. Welcome to salt country! Sodium, even lithium salts here, all kinds. Salt everywhere, just ask Elon Musk! The 8" kills salt. I can't be more plain than that, it does great in places the stock coil is utterly unworkable. And it kills salt while retaining a good bit of sensitivity and depth too. The 10" definitely cuts salt down too, but the 8" takes it down another level again. Patches I had laboriously, slowly struggled to detect with the stock coil in bone dry dirt in July were almost silent with this 8", even though the soil was slightly damp past 2 or 3 inches in many places. That said, what I'm discovering is something Steve has mentioned in the past - the gold out here in a lot of cases is simply just not very deep. This is largely due to soil deflation, or what is sometimes called lag deposits. It just means that the light dirt blows away or otherwise erodes away, leaving behind the heavies fairly close to the surface. You know how when you drywash you can lightly blow the blonde sands out from behind the riffles and expose gold and other heavies? Similar thing, except over and over and over for eons. Anyways, my point is this: even though this 8" is an absolute pleasure to run in places that caused me a lot of frustration from salt response in the past, I managed to get most of the gold with the stock coil years back. I am finding a few dinks in each patch now, and it's because the gold just isn't there anymore. But this 8" is definitely the cheapest way to get 6000-like performance in salt for current GPZ owners, in my opinion. Actually, having run both machines, I believe this 8" may actually be more sensitive than the 11" mono on the 6000, but that just a guess since I didn't get a chance to compare them before the patch lead broke. The response on this coil is crisp and sharp. It goes from 0 to 60 on targets, often skipping all the steps in between, and it's a perfect compliment for running settings like I do with low threshold (around 13) and low smoothing. Here's 3 I got today at an old dink patch. The big flat one was 9" under a basketball size rock, which means the coil heard it from the edge. Which to me was impressive as hell at that depth. The tiny bit of iron was at 1" and a great target. It's literally verging on pen ball size, and that I'm slamming it with a GPZ is just kinda impressive to me. The 3 nuggets might weigh 0.3 grams combined. I had no illusion the concentrics would work any kind of magic in the salt, but this is simply the first time I've been able to get into the field to try them since they were sent to me, so I'm making the best of it. That said, I've run them enough now to say that I do feel they do slightly better in salt than the stock coil. I don't know if it has to do with the smaller TX or what. The improvement is slight though. What I can say is these concentrics are definitely a lot deeper than the stock coil. I pulled a 1 grammer up from what is easily my most gridded spot in NNV, and I know it had zero diggable or even questionable signals left in it. The nicest, most museum quality piece of gold I've ever found came from about 6 feet away so I had hopes, but this one turned out to be average. This crystalline gold is stealth gold, it's very hard to detect. It was a very obvious signal on the 15" concentric though. Unfortunately, the concentric doesn't only struggle in salt but it also struggles in bushy areas since the sensitive part of the coil is well inside the rim of the coil. So if you have areas that look like this: Then this is not the proper place for a concentric, even if you do a bit of weedwacking with the coil. So, I switched to the 8". However, what I wanted to mention is that the concentrics actually are sensitive enough on the edges to pinpoint with on the coil edge. It's not easy, and you really need to be close to the target, but it is doable, which surprised me. I wandered around the brush haphazardly and more or less randomly for a few more hours and got two more little crystalline pieces. Here they are all cleaned up, including the bigger piece I got with the concentric. A drastic difference between the flatter type gold, and you can see why it's harder to detect. Before cleaning: After cleaning: In summary: 8" is a great coil for NNV salt. And the concentric is definitely deep seeking, as AraratGold had posted in the past, I very much agree. But I'm unsure if the restricted sensitivity towards the outer edge which limits the coil's use in rocks and heavy bush cover will mean I end up going back to my 17" spiral, or if the depth gain makes these concentrics worth running outside of wide open fields. Since I'm getting a 6000 I probably won't be using the 8" as much, but the whole reason I'm keeping my 7000 is because I still see a use for these bigger X Coils and I believe these concentrics are going to do great next winter in AZ for me if I get them in the right terrain, and I definitely am not ready to lose the ability to run the 17" round spiral yet either, which I also didn't get to test against the 6000, but I definitely feel is outperforming the 17" elliptical on the 6000 at depth. But that's a 100% guess right now, and something I can test later. One thing to add on from my Arizona 8" post: this coil ran dead stable with zero knock sensitivity here in Nevada. There is something either with the ground or the vegetation causing this 8" to have knock sensitivity down there in Arizona, but not here in Nevada. It happened daily in AZ, it wasn't a mirage. It felt like the machine was trying hard to stay balanced, then when I'd knock it against a rock or just slightly rub against a branch it'd go crazy, then back to normal. I mean 80 or 90 times a day, not my imagination. I'd have to go out of my way detecting not to touch anything. But here in Nevada, not once did it happen with either my pre-repair or post-repair patch lead, and I could knock the coil against anything, no problem. So whatever is happening there in AZ has to be related to either the ground or vegetation. Most of the knock sensitivity was against vegetation, not rocks. It felt like the machine would go out of balance a bit when hitting the vegetation, but that doesn't make sense, and I'm really not sure what the deal was. Part II: the adapter failure next.
  8. Righto guys, Just did a quick, simple test of the 17 spiral and 17 concentric, mainly curious to see how the new concentric would run. Nothing scientific, just the 2 coils running over the same ground to show differences. Settings were not changed, other than between normal and difficult. Bear in mind I was on the edge of Kambalda, near Red Hill lookout which has several towers and electrical infrastructure on it, and we have just had 3 inches of rain, so ground is very damp. Sensitivity 16, threshold level 21 and tone 37, semi auto, high yield only, audio smoothing OFF. Concentric was much sharper on the small 0.3g ball of gold, really noticeable in difficult. Concentric will need much closer overlap of swings when cleaning up a patch, but I have no doubt it will punch deeper and have better sensitivity to small stuff than the 17 spiral ( which is pretty good anyway ) . IMHO, it will be no good for patch hunting, but great for cleaning up a patch. Neither coil suffered from EMI, considering how close I was to the aforementioned electrical equipment. Concentric balanced over the ferrite, although as stated numerous times before, I don't use the damn thing ! Overall impressions ? Top rate finish on the coil and new coil cable is spot on. No heavier than the standard GPZ14. No emi problems. Runs beautifully, no bump sensitivity and more sensitive to small gold than the 17 spiral, which is already very good. Elnur, you have outdone yourself comrade ! Full disclosure, I was gifted this coil to try out for being a loyal customer.
  9. Last year I posted a photo of a wash in Quartzsite showing a bit of horizon in the background along with some basic clues. I challenged anyone to find it. Partly to give out a place I found many years back that I knew had good gold since I had my time with it already. And partly also to prove it could be done from some very basic info. Someone found it last year, took them a couple weeks of searching. I was hoping they'd post here as they ended up with about 3/4 oz, and they are a forum member. The area is getting some significant use by ATV'ers now, I assume to go somewhere else since they don't appear to be prospecting there, but where I used to have to hike a half mile in you can drive right to now. 2 parties passed me by as I was detecting, and one had detectors with them. So I'm not going to show anymore photos of the area as I there is now too much use back there. Anyways, I revisted the wash. The challenge winner's friend showed up a few hours after I did, and probably was surprised to see someone else back there, they appear to be raking stuff down now. I hope they don't destroy everything back there, there are lots of other places to discover too, I meant that as a learning place meant to teach someone how to find similar places on their own, the type of topography, signs of old timers, and geology to look for, and not necessarily a place to mine out and stay at. I had previously run my 17x12 X Coil there (and the stock coil), pretty much the only X Coil that I haven't been all out impressed with, and so I really wanted to try one of my favorites - the 17" X Coil - there too at some point. I finally got a chance to get back down. I was not let down, paid for the trip and more, and still really love this 17". Got a 10 grammer that gave a low-high with some tone curl on it, kind of a weird broken signal, strange given how chunk and solid the nugget is. Thought it was going to be a lunker from that signal, but hit bedrock at about 14 or 15" and lost hope. Still, not a bad find. This was right in the wash so I guarantee that for whatever reason, none of the previous coils heard this nugget. Very mild ground, I always run full bore settings in here with any machine or coil. There were some large rocks I moved before I started digging, so the true depth from the coil might have been more like 18". Ended up with 2 half grammers also. This one was about 9" deep, and was just the faintest little signal, but still unmistakably repeatable. I only got a photo of one, but you get the idea. I traded both of them off at the store when I got into town for some supplies. I was going to put the 8" coil on and try to snag a handful of smaller bits, but I had another spot I wanted to hit (skunked) and I was hungry so I headed back to Q. Most of the trip was for exploration in other areas, checking some totally unknown places out, most without even mines or prospects. Just going off geology and aerials. I spent 2 days exploring and got the big skunk. So nothing to report there. Stopped in to Quartzsite to see if the 6000 might still be here but no luck. My primary use coils have pretty much settled into the 8", 12" spiral, and 17" spiral. (I bought the 12, the 8 and 17 were sent to me free of charge, as noted in the past) I think I have most bases covered with these 3. The 17" is sensitive enough that I literally have to have my phone and keys in the top part of my backpack. It picks the phone up itself, the metal inside, not the EMI. Both the 12" and 17" will pick up my Garrett AT pinpointer at shoulder height when it's off, so I have to put it on the top of my shoulder on my back, and even there I can still sometimes just barely hear it with the 17". And this brings up a new point, we have now reached levels of sensitivity where eventually we may not be able to carry anything on us at all if sensitivity increases further. I've seen posts lately questioning wether one really needs coils other than the stock, or saying the stock coil is great. Let me say unequivocally, that in almost all the places I've detected, that is simply not the case at all and that the GPZ absolutely benefits from a range of coils. Sometimes greatly. That is just fact in my mind at this point. And there are maybe only a small handful of people in the world right now who have more field time in than I do on a wide range of coils on the GPZ so I'm, speaking from experience here and this isn't guesswork. So wether one is looking at the NF options to come, or willing to make an adapter for the X Coils, if one is sticking with the GPZ and is serious about detecting, I absolutely recommend you look into whichever coil option works best for you. But don't stick with the stock coil, I am not impressed with it at all. I am struggling to find one place I might even take it with me to use and I cannot. Again though, I detect mild to medium ground mostly, not hot ground. The 6000 might make all that moot though, interesting times to come ahead! There's a horizon I can show you. We got another 3" of snow after this and so I decided to explore down south. Unfortunately one place I was going to visit got 12-18" of snow and so that trip got momentarily delayed. That's my land. It may not be me there anymore as it's under contract to a new owner right now. If it goes through then I'm off to do a ton of exploration and to find new opportunities. If it falls through, I have a lot of mining to do next season.
  10. I was sent this coil for free to use and keep by the manufacturer many months ago with no expectations of reviews or anything else, and I had intended many times to test it in Nevada for my own personal use, but work kept delaying me and I never made it. But I was able to finally get free from work and give it a solid 12 hours of run time over 2 days in Arizona since it's winter now. Soils are mild, few hotrocks (more on that in a moment). 40-50F degrees out. Mostly shallow, rocky washes or hilltops I've pounded with the stock and 17" X Coil (as well as a 4500). I consider these spots flogged and dead for my purposes, and so great places to see if new products can find missed gold. My observations were as follows: This coil (as expected with a smaller coil) was noticeably quieter than the 17" coil and the stock coil. I was able to bump my threshold up 8-10 points and still had about the same threshold chatter as I did with the 17" coil. I usually run 18 sensitivity here because I like a very stable threshold and EMI can be an issue, but I bumped up to 20 sensitivity with no problem. The coil ground balanced ok and I ran in auto which seemed to work fine. This coil loves hotrocks, as would be expected when you are running a smaller, more sensitive coil. I was finding hotrocks deep, shallow, and in places I considered more or less hotrock free in the past. Conversely, I hope it will do well in salt, which I hope to test this summer in Nevada. This coil is bump sensitive This coil is sensitive to a lot of vegetation, particularly sticks/twigs and grasses. I'm unsure if it's detecting them or bumping them. This coil screams on tiny nuggets just out of range of the stock coil. It gives decent signal on edge of detection, tiny nuggets that I missed with the 17" coil. The light weight made me very much more prone to lift up and detect side walls, benches, and pick up and poke/prod into just about any place I encountered, from beginning of day to end. The weight didn't fatigue my arm after a half day of swinging, 5 or 6 hours. Much of that time was without a bungee. This coil eminates a faint, very high pitched squeel or buzz if you get your ear close to it Overall, detecting with the GPZ feels a lot more pleasurable and less like fighting your equipment with a coil of this size and weight. I've mentioned it in prior posts, but take my word from experience now - it's not the weight of the GPZ that causes problems, it's the coil. And this 8" coil is almost the perfect weight to counterbalance the GPZ with the shaft fully extended - ie, this is the coil weight the GPZ should have been designed for. I'll take another pound on the control box no problem, but add 100 or 200 grams onto the coil end, that causes fatigue. Swinging the GPZ with this coil (or any coil of this weight) is a pleasure and not oppressive. The bump sensitivity I'm guessing is a relic of trying to cram so much wire into a tiny space that might not be meant for it, as I get the feeling that this coil is pressing the limits of how small a Super D can be built. But it does mean that I have to slow down and really concentrate on not hitting rocks or vegetation, which ends up being ok because this is a cleanup coil where I am going slow anyways. I expected to find a handful of faint, edge of detection signals I had missed with my other coils. But other than a couple nuggets, almost all the signals were bright, some even loud, and all pretty obvious. Even right out in the middle of the wash. This coil hits hard on tiny stuff. I haven't compared it to the GB2 or Gold Monster, but I found stuff down to 0.06-0.07 grams and they were all great signals. Pinpointing these tiny targets with the coil edge can be difficult as the center of the coil is more sensitive. And they are too tiny to register on my pinpointer, especially the porous and not flaky ones. And that is why I think I missed all the nuggets originally which I later found with the 8" - its a lot easier to get the center of the coil over more of the potential ground, especially with obstructions in the way. In the end, I didn't find a lot of missed nuggets in nooks and crannies, most of them were simply next to a rock or other obstruction like a bush which I was able to get the center of the 8" much closer to. Overall this seems like a good coil for working steep areas (Colorado comes to mind), surface patches, tight washes, and banks/vertical surfaces. The bump sensitivity is the only real major downside, so a slow and controlled swing is important with this coil I think. If NF doesn't end up releasing some critical sizes of coils and new detector releases make the GPZ cheaper (and less risky to make an adapter) then serious detectorists may want to give X Coils another thought. Because right now I can't help but feel like with these coils I am running a new detector that no one else has access to in a way, and I'm somewhat surprised more hard detectorists/enthusiasts haven't availed themselves of this opportunity. But, in the same respect I'm happy, because my time is slim and I haven't had a chance to put them over a lot of places I know others would have flogged to death already. My favorite coil by far is still the 17", but if this 8" (and the 10") perform well in NNV then I may change my mind on that. Here are the nuggets I found (weights are estimated) and my recollection of why I thought I missed them originally with all my other equipment but then found them with the 8" X Coil: Test Wash 1, less than 0.1 gram, too deep for other coils Test Wash 1, 0.08 grams, next to a rock and slightly into wash bank Test Wash 1, 0.12 grams, from a boot scrape and I had given up finding this with the 17" for some reason Test Wash 1, 1+ gram, next to a rock and oriented vertically in a bedrock crack, not sure why I didn't hear this on at least 6 or 7 previous passes since it's right in the wash, but it didn't produce a diggable signal with other coils/machines Test Wash 1, .2 grams, in a little ring of rocks, was only a few inches deep though Test Wash 1, .15 grams, too deep/edge of detection, or too close to rocks Test Wash 1, 0.12 grams, no idea, great signal and should have found before Test Wash 1, 0.15 grams, in side of bank, arm was probably always too tired to raise the coil up there Test Wash 2, 0.12 grams, no idea why it was missed before, right in middle of wash Test Wash 2, 0.3 grams, 2ft up wash side Bench patch, 0.3 grams, next to cactus, too deep/edge of detection? Bench patch, 0.08 grams, too deep/edge of detection Bench patch, 0.06 grams, edge of detection That was all of them. Smallest was 0.06 grams and very porous and almost on surface, largest was like 1.1 grams but I forget the exact weight. All total was a little over 4 grams out of severely beat up washes and a patch. Not much, but it did pay for my gas down here at least. I think once stuff gets below 0.15 grams, it's not really worth my time to chase on general principal. But when you need to grind out some finds for gas, food, whatever, and if you have a lot of patches that produced more than 5 or 6 stray nuggets, then this little guy can probably pop up a few more when you really need them.
  11. I did the Minelab cable cutting and soldering differently than specified by the manufacturer. Instead of cutting the cable near the Minelab connector I cut it below the Minelab curled cord and installed the 5 pin connector at that location. After the connector was installed and marine grade shrink tubing was applied a plastic tie wrap was attached with another piece of shrink tubing. This is used to pull the cable out of the lower end of the upper shaft since the Minelab curled cord retracts it out of reach. I then used a heat gun to soften and straighten approximately 8 inches of the lower X Coil curled cord. Cut it at that point and attached a new connector at 8” above the lower shaft. I have all three X Coils setup with three new lower shafts attached. This modification allows quick easy change of coils in couple of minutes. It is reasonable to be concerned about interference from the two connectors being located so close to the coil. This is not a problem since the detector only detects motion change relative to the coil. A simple experiment will demonstrate how the detector nulls out metal that is not changing position relative to the coil. Place a small test target on the ground with an aluminum soda or beer can about 2 feet from it. Swing the detector over the small test target. You will only hear the response from the large can. Now tape the can on top of the detector shaft 2 feet from the center of the coil. Now swing the coil over the test target and it will be detected. With the can attached the detector it will sound off as you lift and lower the detector to the ground since the coil is remaining flat while the shaft and can are changing position relative to the coil. In normal detecting when setting the detector down or lifting it I hear this sound-off with the 17” x 12” coil but not with the 10” or the 17” round coils. There is no effect during normal detecting since the coil is not tilting or changing position relative to the shaft. Have a good day, Chet
  12. Picked up my 10 inch x coil during the week, good to get out to my usual spot, picked up these in 2 hours detecting, really impressed with this coil.
  13. Finally got out again with the 15" x 10” X-Coil. It ran really quiet and smooth continually in High Yield, Normal, at Sensitivity at 20. Found 10 small nuggets for a total weight of 4.55 grams. They were between 5 to 8 inches deep in a California pine tree area. The X-Coils work great, but the 15 x 10” is now the go to coil. Have a good day, Chet
  14. Today i received new range coil. This is X-COIL 26" spiral mono. Weight of this monster coil is 1680 gramm. Tomorrow will be testing. This coil for GPX series
  15. I put in some serious days of detecting old patches in Gold Basin in order to get a solid idea of what I personally missed with the Z14 and give my coils more of a workout. Most of the spots I hit were patches I personally found and I doubt anyone else has ever detected, that way I can gauge what exactly I was passing by and get a good feel for the differences between the coils I have with me. However, the first patch I hit was on in Lost Basin proper and not one of my own. I had once met an old timer detecting here as I was exploring back in 2014 and he explained he had found this patch in 2002 and it had produced up to a 1.5 oz'er and about 3-4 ounces in total, mostly deep. It's about 50'x50', seen 3 GPZ's I am aware of, 25" coils, and about 2 decades of detecting. I put on the 17x12, which I was given free by the manufacturer, and began a mental gridding. 12 t-hold, low smoothing, 19 gain, HY, Normal. About halfway through I got a very subtle signal, but it was repeatable. I kicked off low smoothing just to hear the difference and the signal was definitely bigger...maybe wider is a better term. Kicking into Difficult the signal disappeared. Back to my normal settings, I boot scraped an inch and saw the top of a large rock which I assumed was the signal, but after pulling it aside with my pick the signal got stronger. I ended up with a solid ~0.3 grammer at about 10 inches. I'm certain this target didn't make a peep on the Z14. You can see the big boss man overseeing the operation here to the upper left, and also the old dead twigs which the old timer had at one time raked aside, which was what drew my attention to the area to investigate at first. Grand Wash cliffs in the background, the Grand Canyon is directly behind them. Visible is the foreground is the filled in hole, you can see this is pretty typical Lost Basin reddish dirt. I would classify it as mild to low-medium "heat". Some run Difficult here, but I see no need for it. Here is a video of the lack of sensitivity at the tips of the 17x12. It's really noticable when trying to pinpoint and oddly it makes a big ole 17" round easier to pinpoint with for me than an elliptical. I feel as if the 17x12 is like detecting with a 14x8 except with a lot of extra plastic around the edges and with the depth in the center of the coil of a 17" elliptical. It's odd. I'm not sure it's my choice for rocky washes anymore because that sensitive area towards the center is hard to get over everything. Next I moved to a wash in Gold Basin which had produced a lot of sub-1 gram stuff for me in the past and I put on the 10" to do some crumbing. I slowed down and really made an effort to listen for tiny blips but after running through about 40 feet of wash bottom without a piece of gold I decided to grab my Gold Bug 2 and run back over the same ground because I swore I should have had some dinks by then. A lot of caliche is exposed here, and for those who don't know what caliche is, it's basically a limestone conglomerate type rock that acts as bedrock in the desert here. It can be soft or hard as concrete. Almost immedietely I had a strong signal on the side of the wash, which I assumed must be a small bit of tin. I grabbed the GPZ/10" and despite my best efforts I couldn't get any type of real signal to repeat for me. Going back to the GB2 I recovered the target and it ended up being a 0.03 gram tiny nugget, which upon looking with a loupe was quite porous and had tiny microscopic bits of quartz within it, a very common occurence for nuggets here as much of the gold forms within breccia in shears and shattered fault gouge here so it often encapsulates almost microscopic bits of quartz. Due to these non-sluggy sort of targets, the VLF seems to hit much harder on them than the GPZ/10", which probably explains why I can't seem to get the sensitivity on my tiny nuggets as others seem to be reporting, even in other parts of AZ. A 0.1 gram nugget of gold from here might only have 0.05 grams of gold in it, and discontinuous geometry, which is hard on non-VLF machines. I moved on another 5 feet and hit another pretty definite target on the GB2, this time it was a paper-thin flake, I think it was about 0.05 grams. Just holding it in my fingers lightly was enough to bend it. It's at the tip of my pointer finger. It would make a sound on the 10" if I waved it in my scoop right over the coil, but it couldn't hit it at about 1", just too thin even for the GPZ, and that's why I missed it I think. I put my GPZ back in the truck and decided to just run through the last 30 feet or so I had covered with the 10" just out of curiosity. I almost immedietely hit another signal, faint but repeatable. At about 6" I pulled out a 0.2 grammer right on caliche. Not sure how I missed this one, might have gone too fast with the 10". It ended up having a lot of quartz too, and some hematite. And then another 5 feet again, about 5" and sitting on caliche, a 0.2 grammer that I really should have heard before but somehow didn't. This one I got in-situ before brushing it away as it was wedged in between two cemented pebbles. And then finally a 0.15 grammer that really wasn't even very deep. Not sure why I missed this one but it was right in the center of the small wash and there is no chance my coil didn't scrub it. This post got kinda long, so I will take a queue from JW and do a multi-part post. My conclusion (unsurprisingly since we already knew this) is that the target geometry/composition makes a big difference in how successful a person is with the 10" and why I was having trouble understanding why people don't simply just go in with their VLF's instead of the 10X since it's so much quicker and lighter. I know I traded notes with Andy when we first got our 10"' X Coils and he was getting a lot better depth on tiny bits than I was, and I'm sure it's because the gold in the areas he detects is more solid and my gold has a ton more quartz inclusions and porosity. I have some 0.1gram bits that won't make a peep on the 10X even running them directly over the coil in my scoop, and that's due to the target characteristics. Overall, I'm reminded why I rarely spend much time doing this kind of detecting unless I really need to get a couple pieces for morale. I don't live close enough to gold fields where I can spend my time chasing small stuff like this. That's just me and my personal situation, but I feel it's necessary to state since the majority of posters here live much closer to detecting ground and might not understand why I detect the ways I do. It's 1000 miles drive each way for me to go detecting and I'm not retired so I have to make it pay or at least break even. Next post I'll show you what I normally aim for in my personal detecting and why I do it that way even though it breaks some of the "golden rules" of gold detecting. I believe it will be important to make these distinctions for those new people reading these sorts of posts 5, 10, 15 years down the road and wondering why we did what we did. I feel it's important to not copy what others do online, but to develop a strategy and skillset that matches your local conditions and personal situations. My style probably might not even be optimum 150 miles away in the Bradshaws, let alone across the country or world.
  16. I was in Quartzsite looking for flea markets for 2 days with my girlfriend (she is not a fan of prospecting). I snuck off for 2 hours to do some detecting with the 17x12 X Coil which Al had given to me for free to make up for the problems I had with the early X cords. I've not had any issue with cords since then, they stretched again but not enough to bind up in the shaft and inserting/removing coils has been easy now. Since time was slim I decided to hit a wash fairly close to town which had produced a little over 1 ounce for me with the 4500 and GMT, but which I had not visited with the GPZ at all yet. I figured it was the best chance for me to find a nugget in a short amount of time. Most of the gold found previously was 1/2 gram to 2 grams here. Not much smaller, and not much bigger. The wash has bedrock from surface to about 3 feet deep, a nice quiet gneiss and schist assemblage, pretty standard in Q. Part of the reason for the mild soils. I also thought odds were good that I'd missed all the deep, small stuff back in 2012 and that it'd be perfect to clean up with the GPZ/X combo. I'll try something different this time and I'm going to show the horizons and surrounding land. Anyone who really wants to track it down and find it, go for it. As I detect less and less, someone new or just starting can figure out where they are at. This is looking down towards some mountains that can be ID'ed. The part of the wash that produces gold is about 1/2 mile hike uphill from here, and is currently unclaimed. The 17x12 ran even quieter here than in Gold Basin, no problem running at 20 gain, HY, Normal. Though I run in low smoothing because I like a stabler threshold than most so I can move faster and concentrate. Within 5 minutes of hiking to my spot, I got a decent signal, a bit quiet but repeatable. Mostly only sounded off in a circular area under the coil, as if the coil were an 8" round, and I couldn't hear it towards the ends of the coil. I scraped 2 inches of gravel away with my boot, and the signal was now pretty stout. After breaking out the pick, I got down about 15" and started exposing jagged bedrock. I put the coil on edge and pinpointed the signal to a small area between bedrock juts and then began chiseling and brushing away gravel until I found the nugget with my pinpointer, so I could get a picture in situ. It's at the point of my finger inside a crack that required screwdriver excavation. I pried the nugget out of the crack after fidgeting with the bedrock a bit, and was a bit surprised to see it was larger than expected, in fact this is largest nugget I've found in this wash. I figured it was 3.5 grams by feel. It ended up running around 4.5 grams and paid for all our gas and food for the 2 day trip down. So I was happy, for what was at the time about 15 minutes total into the short time I had to detect on this trip. The hole is at the bottom of my coil. The nugget was wedged down in that bedrock which is unfortunately covered in shadows in this photo, and the total depth was just shy of the length of the coil, so around 16-17". There is a new ATV trail almost to the point where I started detecting so I can't help but feel at least 1 person has had a Z14 over this wash, but I'm not certain. This nugget was sitting almost vertical, and I suspect that is why it was missed previously and not a screaming signal on the 17x12, though the signal was definitely sharp and unmistakable. Another 30 minutes of poking and prodding into the rocks and bedrock, and I pulled up a deep drywasher nail and a the head of another nail. Both sharp and loud signals right in the gut of the wash that my 4500/GMT combo had missed 7 or 8 years ago. I was near the start of the wash, thus the end of my journey and thinking it was about time to turn around and hike back down. And then I hit my final target on the short hike, a ~1 grammer which was also a sharp and pronounced signal, and also right beneath a stretch of exposed bedrock. It's at the tip of my finger, didn't have to dig around with the screwdriver for this one. Here is the sum total of what I found with about 1 hour of detecting and 1 hour of hiking there and back. This is a wash I detected back in 2012'ish with a range of 4500 coils and my GMT (before I had a GB2), probably 8 or 9 times total. I covered most of the upper portion of the wash that had produced nuggets for me in the past, though I suspect I could pull another 1 or 2 out of there if I tried with the 10". I'm also pretty certain the 10" would have missed the larger, deep nugget, but I can't be absolutely certain. Total weight, not bad for an ~hour of work. And one final horizon shot right where the nugget zone starts, up towards the base of the mountain. For all the internet sleuths and greenhorns who can't find anyone to share locations with them to get them started. Good luck. Enough clues here to find the area for a dedicated individual. Overall I was happy with the 17x12 in the rocky wash/bedrock areas. It ran smoother here than Gold Basin, both dealing with ground mineralization and EMI. GB gives me these zips and zaps that are absent here, and struggles with the BIF and basalt, and it's real hard to run this 17x12 full bore in washes there with high black sand concentrations. The magnetite chunks in Q gave me problems but they do with the Z14 and 4500 too, so nothing new there. The main issue I have is the edges seem to not be sensitive enough on this coil compared to the rounds. So while the geometry allows you to push into tight cracks, you aren't always getting full sensitivity in the depths of the cracks as you would with the 10" round. The shape of the area of maximum sensitivity within the coil is odd. A simple sweep often misses subtle targets unless you are over one of the sweet spots, and the sweet spot doesn't appear to just be a smaller ellipse within the elliptical coil, it's some odd shape with hotspots within itself. That sounds confusing, but I have a hard time explaining it better. I think Condor mentioned it already, but pushing/pumping the coil into tight spots over the center of the coil (if possible) often works better to hear the coupling between very tiny or very weak targets to determine if it's good repeatable or ground mineralization. I've been doing this out in the open in the flats in GB too, especially in areas of high mineralization, to determine what is a good target. One thing is certain, in the US it's mostly about knowing where to go, or knowing someone who knows where to go. Or having exclusive access to land. This shows why. This was found in 2 hours, but only because I was lucky enough to start detecting at a time when a lot of people ran their detectors subpar by copying settings off internet forums, allowing me to find a lot of stuff the others missed. Those days are largely gone since the GPZ levels the playing field today. I couldn't walk into a goldfield I've never been to an expect the same results, it was only my knowledge of what and where I found gold in the past that let me do this. So, don't get discouraged if your results are not the same. A new guy would simply just have to hope to stumble on this place by dumb luck since all the leads are gone now, while I can just hike right to it. So maybe this will help someone new find an "old" place. I don't detect as much as I used to these days as I have other projects going, but Al (X manufacturer) sent me this coil for free to try last year, and I figured it'd be nice to do a write up since I wasn't able to run my GPZ on the commercial project I have going due to EMI interference from the CAT 336. The coil performed great here though, and it was nice to just get out and finally do some detecting for fun.
  17. I've been getting out for a few hrs 3 or 4 days a week down here in Sunny Yuma, plus a weekend trip to Quartzsite. My thanks to forum member Will for showing me a new area in the Q where I found the 2 biggest nuggets. The 17" round X Coil on the GPZ has been my go to set up. I really like the ergonomics of the 17x12 coil, but the 17" round has really been finding some tiny gold at depth. I lost a few weeks of detecting after my GPZ started losing audio after a few hrs of detecting. I sent it in to the Detector Doctor and they couldn't duplicate my issue, since then its running fine. I've been detecting the same areas here in Yuma for the past 10 years with the old GPX 4000, the SDC and now the GPZ. Nuggets are getting pretty hard to find in these hammered areas so I really look for the new edge in detecting. I'm fond of the Sp01 booster connected directly to the Z then connected to quality earbuds at the booster. I took some of JP's advice on lowering the volume of the Z, then using the booster to raise it at the earbuds. What I understood to be JP saying was a high volume on the Z is also amplifying surface mineralization, creating clutter noise and concealing deep targets. I'm no expert, but it sounds reasonable so I'm going with it. I'm thinking the X-Coil and Sp01 are giving me a new edge on missed gold, maybe. The concept, nevertheless, keeps me out there plugging away and trying to put that coil over some yellow stuff. I took a separate picture of the tiny gold. None of them will register individually on my cheapo scale, so I had to group them to get a weight. Some of these tiny nuggets have come at incredible depths, at least considering their overall weight and audible response with such a large coil. Probably 3 to 4 inches for most of them. The 17" round seems to be hottest right between the center windings at about 2 inches off the edge. Sometimes a side to side sweep on tiny gold loses the signal. Pushing the coil and center windings at the signal brings them up smartly. Mitchel just seems to be having a run of bad luck on gold with his X Coil, mine has exceeded my expectations especially on really small gold.
  18. My first outing with the 15” x 10” X-Coil was a very satisfying experience. Settings used are; High Yield, Normal, Freq. Auto, Sens 20, Volume 12,Threshold 1, Tone 53, Vol Limit 12, Auto Smoothing Off, Ground Balance Auto, GS Off I ran a quick test on a 0.08 gram test nugget with the 10” round which produces some noise and false target responses when running with my wide open settings. Changed to the new 15” x 10” X-Coil and ran over the 0.08 test nugget again. Both coils were getting a good loud response at approximately 3.5 inches. I ran the 15” x 10” coil for 5 hours a day for 5 days. It was stable and quiet (except for a little very low level EMI). The noise and false target responses experienced previously with the 10” round coil were gone. There were no problems with ferrite balancing. Franconia, AZ has produced some large nuggets. A 3 lb quartz rock with 15.9 oz. of gold was found there the previous week. It was a US Army Air to Air gunnery practice range during WW2. So you are forced to dig a lot of deep targets. There are a lot of bullets and small pieces of screen wire blasted from the towed targets. I only found two small nuggets between bullets and wire pieces. They are 0.6 g and 0.2 g. Overall this is a very sensitive coil and a pleasure to have the lighter weight and ability to get into smaller spaces. Have a good day, Chet
  19. Well, I tried a new way to get out to this new gold area I found. The gold seemed fairly small, but I had to hike in at least 3 miles to get there. So I tried to drive in another way in hopes of only having to hike in a mile. Of course Google Earth made things seem better than they were (almost like I could drive right there), but in the end I only cut about a mile off the hike (one way). So now I had a decision to make … take my GPZ 14" coil, the GM1000, or what I call my Midget Coil (10" Xcoil). GPZ 14" about killed me getting out there last time so that was out. I love the GM1000 on bedrock, but some of the bedrock here was very hot. Usually in those cases, I will go to my GPZ 10" Xcoil, which I venture to say is at least on par with the SDC 2300 (with the exception of being a little bigger). And the Xcoil is still a pleasure to hike with. So off I went. I started out hitting the areas I had been to before and got some good signals. First piece was only about .1g. Then I started finding slightly bigger .2g pieces. Most of these seemed to be what I call runners. Those are the ones in washes that I find on the sides of the wash, trying to run away when they see me coming. The larger coils tend to lose a bit of depth when checking the sides and depressions. The 10" Xcoil, however, does very well getting in there. Overall, 5 pieces were found (total .75g). Not a lot, but at least half of these finds were detected very carefully with the 14" coil and were missed. The Xcoil was very clear on all but a 1 grainer piece that was about 2" deep on it's side. All in all, it was just a fun day crumb chasing.
  20. Gidday All, Managed to get two hours in today before rain chased me home with the 17 inch Russian X coil. Blew me away just how good this coil is ! I purposely picked a small area of State forest that I have flogged for the last 10 years, with all 3 different GPX detectors, with coils from 11-25 inches, the SDC, and even a QED. This spot has yielded many ounces of gold to me from 0.05g up to 33g. I had declared it " dead ", as my last 10 or so efforts with the standard GPZ14 and GPZ19 have yielded nothing more. 2 hours in today, nearly back to the car, and I get an obvious signal. This was slightly downhill from a small patch of small reef gold, in an area that I have literally smashed. Coil was about 2 inches above the ground because of sticks and clumpy grass. Removed said obstacles and signal firmer. 4 inches in and I am in nice gravel, target now screaming, out pops what turns out to be buck shot. Bugger, but this is from a spot that I have NEVER managed to get a target in ! Moved about 10m along and same thing, another obvious target, once again coil 2 inches over the ground. Dug in and same again, 4 inches down in nice gravel, target screaming louder than the buckshot, out pops what turns out to be an 0.65 gram bit of reef gold ! I'll be buggered, I thought ! Rain then chased me home. Coil was very sensitive, being able to pick up my 0.11g test piece at 2 inches. I tried knocking the coil against a tree a few times and no bump sensitivity. 17 round weighs the same as the GPZ14. All in all, a fantastic coil. Don't know what the Russians have done differently, but Minelab need to have a good hard look ! Further testing to come when our shitty weather finally breaks. Cheers, Rick
  21. I have received the 15x10 Spiral X-coil. Here is what it looked like when I picked it up. My initial reaction when I was given the box by my mailbox center was that it was 'light' and did they have another package coming? haha Well, it is all in one box and well sealed. It is not packaged like a great looking Amazon box with hardly anything in it. This is a custom box with a lot of tape. Inside the black plastic was a white box that was also well taped. That box contained a sandwich of the coil with coil cover and an extra coil cover. Thanks. The coil is terminated with one connector just like all the GPX coils when you buy them. Tomorrow I'll take the coil, the 19" coil, the 14" coil to my local car stereo installer who also works on battery scooters and electric bikes. If they don't want to do the job then I have called an electronics store that said bring it by with the instructions and they might have someone do it as a side job. The final destination for tomorrow is a radio store here that still has ham and cb radios. One of these places would do a better job than me. I've read all the instructions multiple times now and I haven't had the 'practice' of using that connector and there is not a lot of extra wire to play with so someone around here puts these on all the time. I just need to get these coils to them to make the dongle. Chet, Andy, JW, Simon, Dave and Jason have all said they would help. We'll get it done. Mitchel
  22. So I couldn't resist having a crack at my own adapter soon as my x-coil turned up today. I was pooping my undies on the enitial turn on but all in all wasn't to bad to do it you take your time I started with number 3 blue wire at bottom first as hardest to get to to solder then worked my way up to 2 and 1 the 4 and 5 spent a good 20 mins thoroughly checking for any shorts or anything when I was happy I hot glued all wires and invetween stopping them from being able to move or that in future then heat shrink followed by lots isolation tape I then put the female plug back on the std 14 and works like charm I also waterproofed the xcoil by adding marine silicone in and around the plug and a thin layer along the joining lip were skid plate goes all and all thought for a first attempt wasn't to bad and I didn't make it go boom so that a bonus
  23. So my gpz turned up on Friday and I'm super loving it and my 10"x-coil should be here Wednesday, as soon as I got it out the box I grabbed my we test gold ranging from 0.025 to 1.71 gram and shot out to my we test area that happens to be gravel pit in known gold area.. I found for my area in NZ I was geting the best depth and response on general and high yield with audio smoothing off.. I had a play with the ferrite ring with ground balancing then factory reset and ground balance with no ferrite ring.. So my question is does the ferrite ring gb affect depth and sensitivity at all in low to medium ground. What I noticed was our soil and were I hunt in creek beds you hit pockets of high black sand then less etc. I didn't realy notice any difference in performance but I do think that the ferrite gb did run quieter in the ground over all. Does anyone have any tests or input on ferrite balancing vs no ferrite? I plan to get out this weekend for my first hunt with the 10 xcoil all going to plan. So will be sure to put up a link for the YouTube video when made and my finds if any lol I'm checking out new spot
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