Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'amazing finds'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Metal Detecting & Gold Prospecting Forums
    • Meet & Greet
    • Detector Prospector Forum
    • Metal Detecting For Coins & Relics
    • Metal Detecting For Jewelry
    • Metal Detecting For Meteorites
    • Gold Panning, Sluicing, Dredging, Drywashing, Etc
    • Rocks, Minerals, Gems & Geology
    • Metal Detector Advice & Comparisons
    • Metal Detecting & Prospecting Classifieds
    • First Texas - Bounty Hunter, Fisher & Teknetics
    • Garrett Metal Detectors
    • Minelab Metal Detectors
    • Nokta / Makro Metal Detectors
    • Tesoro Metal Detectors
    • White's Metal Detectors
    • XP Metal Detectors

Categories

  • Best of Forums
  • Gold Prospecting
  • Steve's Guides
  • Steve's Mining Journal
  • Steve's Reviews

Categories

  • Free Books
  • Bounty Hunter
  • Fisher Labs
  • Garrett Electronics
  • Keene Engineering
  • Minelab Electronics
  • Miscellaneous
  • Nokta/Makro
  • Teknetics
  • Tesoro Electronics
  • White's Electronics
  • XP Metal Detectors
  • Detector Programs
  • Spreadsheets

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Facebook


YouTube


Instagram


Twitter


Pinterest


LinkedIn


Skype


Location:


Interests:


Gear Used:

Found 117 results

  1. Australian man finds 624g gold nugget worth $37,000 while walking dog 13 May, 2019 7:56pm The father said he had been informed the nugget would likely be worth more than the A$35,000 estimate if it was sold whole. Photo / News Corp An Australian family have literally struck gold after finding a valuable gold nugget during a Mother's Day outing. The family from Bendigo in Victoria, who asked to remain anonymous, were walking their dog — fittingly named Lucky — on the outskirts of town on Sunday morning when the daughter kicked something hard lying on the ground. At first, the father and his two daughters were unsure of what they had found — but it has since been confirmed by experts as a 624 gram gold nugget with an estimated value of at least $35,000 ($37,000). "I actually walked right past it but my daughter pretty much kicked it as she was walking. She then goes — dad, is this gold? I said, I think it might be," the father told the Bendigo Advertiser. The stunned family first took their find to an IGA supermarket to weigh it, with the rock coming in at 624 grams, or 20 ounces. The father said he had been informed the nugget would likely be worth more than the A$35,000 estimate if it was sold whole, and that he did plan to sell it eventually. He said the unexpected windfall had come at a crucial time. "We've come on some tough times so it's really good because we've been struggling financially. It couldn't be better timing really," he told the Bendigo Advertiser. "Just having it at home, I've been like where do we store it? I haven't been sleeping very well and we think it's best just to sell it." He said the "really random find" had inspired the family to return to the site and look for more gold lying beneath the surface. "Usually when you find a nugget that big, there will be more gold around so hopefully that's the case," he told the publication. However, it's not the first time an Aussie has struck it rich. Last September, a huge gold nugget worth at least A$110,000 was uncovered by a retired prospector in remote Western Australia. That find weighed in at a hefty 3.23 kilograms and was dubbed "Duck's Foot" because of its unique shape. And in 2017, Surfers Paradise gold digger Greg Cooke made headlines after finding several gold nuggets on a northern Gold Coast beach over several visits. In fact, Australia is famous for its treasure trove of gold nuggets, with eight of the world's 10 largest found in the country over the years. The "Welcome Stranger" nugget, pictured below, weighing between 2380 and 2284 ounces, is the biggest ever found on the planet and was discovered at Moliagul, near Dunolly in Victoria, in 1869. The "Welcome Stranger" nugget, weighing between 2380 and 2284 ounces, is the biggest ever found on the planet. Photo / Supplied Source: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=12230581
  2. “The single biggest hoard of Celtic coins ever found is now thought to be two separate stashes that were buried together. The Le Câtillon II hoard includes 70,000 gold and silver coins and 11 gold torques, or necklaces, and dates to the First Century AD. Researchers believe that two distinct tribes created the currency, due to variations in the quality of their production as well as the metals used. The collection, thought to be worth £10million ($13million), was brought to the island and buried - most likely to hide it from Roman invaders, experts say.” Full story and photos here
  3. “A man who unearthed a £145,000 Anglo-Saxon pendant has found more treasure dating back about 800 years. Tom Lucking's latest find saw him dig up a brooch dating back to between 1200 and 1300 in Wymondham, Norfolk in September. In 2014, the then student found a pendant in Winfarthing, Norfolk dating from circa 630AD. Mr Lucking, 27, said the brooch, which features two lions and is studded with two pink stones, was a "special" find.” Full story and photos here
  4. https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?p=3097768#post3097768
  5. “Let us take you back to Reno over 147 years ago. In the year 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant was about to go into his second term, mining was the main source of economic prosperity throughout the western United States, and the entire state of Nevada's population was less than 50,000 people (1870 Nevada Census). During this time, the Free Masons were a prominent fraternal organization. They lodged their members and had held meetings in several places across the great basin. This includes: where Reno City Plaza now sits, the 13th Masonic Lodge on 1st street, and the recently demolished lodge next to the Whitney Peak hotel. During the lodge's demolition in late winter of 2019, construction workers found a tin-container placed inside a large rock of sandstone. The general manager of the Whitney Peak Hotel, Eric Olson, recognized the box as a time capsule placed by the masons. Olson, who also practices free-masonry, asked to have the time capsule properly removed by specialists and be interpreted by practicing historical experts and masons-alike. "I knew that it was a time capsule because, as a Free Mason, history is something we take pride in," said Olson. "I wanted to make sure whatever was inside of that container needed to be taken care of properly by a professional."” For the rest of the story and a list of the finds visit the source article.
  6. Hello everyone. I've been off the web as it relates to metal detecting for much of the past year. Let's just say life has gotten in the way, it's just been one of those years. I'm a member of ringfinders and I got a call this week I just had to share with everyone. I got a call about about a buried stash of silver in a backyard. According to what I was told, Grandpa had buried a stash of silver coins in the backyard and had only revealed that he had two weeks prior to his death. I was given the areas to hunt (1.8 acre property), but no idea what if anything was containing these coins in terms of container. I was pulling beer can after beer can and nail after nail I got a solid 16 tone on the Nox and I dug it. Turned out it was a 36" pipe that made the tell-tale sound of having something in it. Long story short we had to cut the pipe open and when we did it was awesome. A find of a lifetime, a cache of silver coins.
  7. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6890247/Immaculate-coin-worth-100-000-discovered-amateur-metal-detectorist-Kent.html
  8. https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=272132
  9. Here’s an oldie. https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=272050 https://www.quora.com/How-many-years-ago-was-Julius-Caesar-How-do-you-go-from-BCE-to-CE-or-AD
  10. Hi all, This is my first post here but been lurking for a while.It's not often that you can pin a find to the owner but this is exactly what happened after I unearthed this gold medallion from pasture on a farm near my home.It gave a solid 18 on field 1.I live in south wales u.k..On the front is a name and the reverse gives details of a walk that it was presented for.After getting home I did some research and uncovered this news article from a local paper dated 1903.The last sentence gives the name D.T. Davies and the time of 7Hrs 1 Min as detailed on the medallion.I then searched the 1901 census for Builth Wells and found details of his address and family.He was one of nine children and an apprentice tailor.Now this medallion was found 50 miles away from Builth Wells so how did it get there?I then searched a later census for the village near to the find and discovered that the family had moved here at a later date.Anyway to cut a long story short he got married here,had nine children of his own and died in 1954.I also discovered a nice victorian shilling on the same day.I have had the nox since October and I have found a lot of silver with it including william 3rd shilling,william 3rd sixpence and a george 3rd shilling to name a few.Thanks Minelab for a great machine.I love it!
  11. I didn't see this linked anywhere else yet - if it has been then please delete this Steve. Anchor from the richest shipwreck in history, supposedly in around 300 ft. of water. I'd be tempted to take a few weeks off and do some technical diving if I was any closer. https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/anchor-found-cornwall-fresh-clue-14080977
  12. Here is a nice story I stumbled across today about some volunteers finding a guys lost wedding ring out in the ocean near an Island off the coastline of NZ. A team of metal detectorists have described the "absolute buzz" of managing the near-impossible task of finding a lost ring in the middle of Auckland's Hauraki Gulf. Auckland man Eddie Hayman was on a boat celebrating a friend's wedding off Waiheke Island on February 16, when he went for a swim and his wedding band came off in the water. Unable to find it himself, he searched online in a desperate attempt to find a way to retrieve it. https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/110822835/wedding-ring-lost-off-aucklands-waiheke-island-found-by-diving-metal-detectorists Looks like a CTX 3030 and Excalibur II were used for the task judging by the photos on the little video clip on the article.
  13. https://www.minelab.com/usa/go-minelabbing/news?article=352372
  14. Buddy mine found these turtles last Dec frozen in a farm field. They were smaller than a quarter. They were hibernating but the farm is active and they would have turned it over before they could make it out of there. Don't know what number they showed up as 🙂 Will be releasing them in june.
  15. By no means am I a top level detectorist at every different kind of hunting. Deep old coins, Gold Rings Beach Hunting, CW, Ancient Coins/Artifacts, Gold Nugget chasing...and more. Heck I have Field Staff members who do certain hunts better than I. But I do consider myself one of the more versified hunters who actually does quite well with a variety of machines in many styles of hunts. Here is one kind of hunt I have to give adulation... my video guy Ryan and his son. This father/son team has taken on a style of detecting most of us dare. He has done a few videos now of some stunner saves, but I feel this one takes the cake. If doing this please be sure to wear the proper protective gear and always have permission. Would you go Down Under for a fistful? Watch and enjoy as they recover find after find after find.
  16. Gold Basin Mining District has a long and colorful history. Starting back around 1861 the road now called Pearce Ferry Road was the trail that took the old timers down to the Colorado River. The River separated Arizona and Nevada. The Ferry was the only way for travelers to cross. Outlaws, Indians, cowboys and settlers heading to California were all part of the local landscape. This is the area where D’artagnon Jackson found an amazing find with his Gold Monster 1000 on January 22, 2019. “Dar” had purchased his Gold Monster 1000 from Doc at Doc’s Detecting in Henderson Nevada almost one year ago in January of 2018. Doc had taken him to Gold Basin for a day of one on one training. Dar lives in the state of Washington, and only gets to Gold Basin twice a year. He joins his brother, J.R. from Utah and they travel to Gold Basin to detect. Dar has been looking for elusive gold nuggets for 15 years with no success. He has owned every low end $200 detector on the market, with no success. However, armed with his Minelab Gold Monster, all of that was about to change. As he was detecting, looking for meteorites , and of course his first gold nugget, if he could be so lucky, he stumbled upon a good target. At three inches he uncovered a pull-tab. Somewhat disappointed, he said, “I remembered what Doc had taught me. Always check your hole before you fill it back in, there might be another target.” Somewhat reluctantly Dar swung the 5 X 10 coil of his Gold Monster over the shallow hole. He got a good target sound, and it was registering as non-ferrous, however the pull tab also had registered as non-ferrous. He started to dig deeper, and the ground started getting more hard packed. Ringing in the back of his head was Doc’s admonition, “When the target is deep and the ground is hard packed, it is less likely to be a trash target.” At 8 inches, Dar saw a glint of gold. Could this be his very first nugget after 15 years? NO! It was something much more impressive that spoke to the unique history of this Gold Basin area. It was an 1852 U.S. Gold dollar with a “D” mint mark. The coin was in amazing condition considering it was 167 years old. Needless to say, Dar, can’t believe that he found such a unique treasure, let alone, it was the very first piece of gold he has ever found. Think of it, this coin is 167 years old and yet this coin was minted only 76 years after the founding of our country via the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Later, after getting back to a computer, Dar found out just how special this coin is. There are only 125, 1852 mint mark “D” $1 gold pieces known to exist today. Valued at around $900 to $1,400 depending on condition and this one looks pretty good. Gold Fever? Yes, Dar has a really bad case of it now. Congratulations D’artagnon!
  17. Check out this story. https://www.foxnews.com/science/holy-grail-found-rare-penny-might-be-worth-1-7m-after-it-was-found-in-boys-lunch-money
  18. https://www.minelab.com/usa/go-minelabbing/success-stories
×
×
  • Create New...