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Found 81 results

  1. It seems they are still finding a few little nuggets out there Paul. I doubt they will let you detect there but maybe you can go near? http://www.watoday.com.au/wa-news/gold-fever-in-wa-as-miner-digs-up-big-nuggets-20171102-gzdgmf.html What say the Prospectors already over there? Mitchel
  2. Ok NursePaul touched down in OZ, picked him up on Saturday, but in his excitement to get over here he forgot his ports with clothes, Z, etc etc. no no regardless of what he says about Airlines, that`s my story and I`m going to stick to it. We are having a lot of trouble communicating, I don`t know what version of English you Yanks use but tis French to me for sure............ So here we are waiting for his gear coming via Pony Express-Cobb & Co and I`ve got the best excuse I`ve every had as to why I`m not finding gold.....................But the xxxx is good yes/no..............and we are sort working out sign language, although judging by the smoke coming out his ears I think we will switch to smoke signals...............
  3. A comment I made on Jins post recently reminded me of how easy it is to walk over good sized gold. We are all familiar with the horrible loud screams detectors make over big surface targets. Sometimes the cause is obvious, usually surface rubbish such as a visible piece of tin or squashed beer can. Occasionally, when walking paddocks (which I mostly do) it turns out to be something useful, such as a lost spanner or fuel cap from a tractor - I have even found a grease gun lying concealed in the grass. These items I always return to the grateful landowner. More commonly, however, it is something useless like an old horseshoe, worn out cultivator point and/or the sheared bolts which once held it to the plough tyne. After digging a number of these the temptation to keep walking (with ears still ringing) becomes ~almost~ irresistible. Back in the Minelab SD2200 days I had permission to work a large Victorian property located on the Tarnagulla granite pluton to the north of Dunolly. This had a number of unworked shallow Tertiary palaeochannels crossing it, on one of which I located a 7 oz patch. Mostly the gold was smallish and reasonably deep, but the same location was also littered with shallow shotgun shells. These were very loud and nearly drove me nuts, and in my frustration I ignored one outlier - - - Fast forward a number of years and, armed with later technology (GPX4000) I decided to check the patch once more and - - - WHUMP/SCREAM - - - greeted my ears over that same target. I kicked the dirt in annoyance - and then spotted the 70 grammer I had ignored years earlier: I had foolishly made the assumption that all the gold in that patch was deep and small, therefore loud shallow targets had to be junk - overlooking the possibility that something once deep could have been ploughed to the surface - - - I kept it to remind me of the old detecting maxim: "Dig your targets"
  4. RedDirtDigger

    2018 West Oz Pilbara Trip

    Two of us made the 5 day trip from eastern OZ to the Western Australian goldfields for a 8 week detecting trip.(armed with 7000,s and SDC) We targeted remoter spots that are not really on the radar. We invested in a pile of permits and researched lots of available ground spots. Lots of walking and lots of barren gullies and creeks...... but occasionally we found the odd gully or slope not touched by a detector that yielded some nice runs of gold. We went 50/50 with our finds, sharing is the way to get a bigger tally when 2 or 3 of you (of equal ability) spread out searching large areas. All up we shared 45 ounces between two of us. There are many ugly specimens not pictured and we will have a big crush and smelt day soon. Cheers RDD
  5. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-45468159
  6. auminesweeper

    90 Kilos Of Gold Species

    I found this posted elsewhere I don't know if folks have seen it yet ? if so just remove it. Enjoy. http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-10/rich-gold-seam-half-a-kilometre-deep-in-kambalda/10219576?pfmredir=sm
  7. “Australia’s all-time record annual gold production (314 tonnes) … might well be exceeded*,” said Dr Sandra Close, from mining consultancy* Surbiton. https://www.heraldsun.com.au/kids-news/australia-set-for-record-gold-haul-in-2018-as-mining-booms/news-story/0f985c566f657751313c4a5c590c0cc1
  8. Last month, Reg Wilson detected this pretty 50 gram colour in pipeclay at about 20" with his QED: Last fortnight, while we were detecting a remote area in the far west of Victoria with limited success, He also scored the Edward 7th medallion (above) The week before, while working together he scored a Chinese coin (no image) and this naval button. Any speculation as to nationality welcome: During the same time period, apart from some gold, I managed to score enough munitions to start a military campaign Now, despite many decades of detecting goldfields, I've never found a Chinese coin. How come some people find interesting stuff while detecting? Not holding my mouth right perhaps - - ?
  9. For anyone in Perth, Australia area who likes to hunt for meteors it appears you have a new target. https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/space/giant-burning-fireball-stuns-aussies-in-western-australia/news-story/475255315b8bb8a20934655cdc6b635d There is a good video of it on that news site showing it coming down, not far from Perth.
  10. Unfortunately, nothing much to brag about this winter . The weather, in sharp contrast to last year, was wet and miserable and all the properties targeted were under crop. Anyway, enough excuses. Managed to scrounge an ounce reworking last years shallow leads which were now free of long grass, allowing the coil to run at least 4" closer to the ground. The three rough bits were detected by Reg Wilson and I on an excursion to a patch of forest way out on the western edge of Victoria's gold bearing zone. The larger 5 gm piece (found first by Reg) got us excited but only had two more small companions. All found with the very latest QED which Howard graciously supplied for testing. The unworked shallow lead discovered last year and I reworked this year. Reg and I recovered many ozs off it last year, including 19 and 53 gram pieces. It begins at the small ironstone hill in the background and extends for well over a kilometre with the gold thinly scattered along its length. Looking down the lead the other way. It runs directly down the centre of the image and (hopefully) beyond the distant tree line onto the next property currently under crop. Detail of the rough 5 grammer:
  11. The five cent piece is the smallest coin in circulation in Australia now and most of my photos where I have used a coin for scale I have used a 5 cent and the creature on the coin is the echidna. In the 7 years I have lived in Victoria I have only ever seen maybe a dozen echidnas, but what makes this guy so special is this morning he was in my back yard.😯😯😯 The half grammer came from Cockatoo Bush a couple of years ago, but I have seen way more half grammers than echidnas. 🙂 Dave
  12. I’ve taken the equinox underwater with the Hungarian headphones twice now and I think I’ve experienced the best and worst scenario for the equinox. Firstly I went into a popular rock pool which I’ve detected successfully with one of my Pulse Induction machines (ATX) with decent success although I did ok, I had to greatly reduce sensitivity and increase pulse delay for it to be stable but still it was enough to find about 60 coins and a few rings in this small pool HOWEVER, the equinox was very very unhappy in these conditions and struggled to signal when the coin was placed on the rocks which was 2- 3 inches on our 10c coins (which is very similar in size and conductive to a nickel and therefore general gold ring territory) but when detecting purely through salt water it was capable of 7-8” on the same coin (just estimating but it was MUCH more than over the rocks) I messed around with sensitivity, discrimination, different modes (was using beach 2), sweep speed, swing height, ground balancing with tracking on and off, recovery speed as well as testing to see if the test items would register in all metal (if they came up as iron) to no avail, I don’t know what kind of rock it is but detectors clearly don’t like it. Next outing was a sandy beach with sandstone rocks and clay base which the detector functioned adequately over. I only used beach 2 and found recovery speed 4 is good because swing speed is slower under water so theoretically gives more depth, the sensitivity couldn’t really be run over 14 (I was 2m deep in salt water) at this location apparently but 10c targets were recoverable from 8” The Hungarian headphones aren’t very loud underwater (even to my 24 year old ears) which seems to be a theme with the equinox so I believe it COULD be that the 3.7V lithium battery is insufficient to run these kind of Piezo’s but I’m far from an expert. Anyway, the nox went well and found some smaller than usual gold pieces 👍 Today’s treasure:
  13. This year, 2018, I'm working thru the year to pay up on last years not so great stab at a golden prospects in Australia last year, 2017. It was a great trip, always is, but a lot of little factors kept me gold poor *which I use to pay for food, fuel and amenities* so I leaned on the credit card a little to hard. Hahh! No one ever said I'd get rich but ehh~ One can dream by the camp fire.~~ Another driving factor for this post is that my email does not like to send pictures so this is for you all who have asked "Where are the pictures?" when I tried to send them. Well that aside Its Always A Good Go down under. I stayed mostly in the region of Kalgoorie last year, hard hunted land that, so I could be of help and hang around with my mates in Coolgardie while they fixed up a new caravan and ute. The gold was small and hard to come by but I still got a few ounces in littles from the EL's I applied for, and yes sent the reports in for, but in all here are a few good days on the scales : And here are what most days went like. I only had a few days streaches during the weeks out bush where I caught the skunk... but I entertained myself otherwise 😉 I did find one small meteorite but it chose to find the hole in my pocket instead of coming home with me. Bugger. But while I was out and about I decided to look for another mineral I knew occured in the region were I was and took a few days driving the fence lines to find it. Chrysoprase. Never did find the mine that my mate pointed me towards but I did find an area that had the right indicators, what is called white and blue chrysoprase and chalcedony, and on stopping there I took a couple of days to speck around. I was finding mostly low grade stuff, the above picture, but found one good bit with just the tip sticking out like an iceberg: Among other interesting rocks like this one, semi-crystalline quartz with some nice shiny bubbly limonite and from another area of flats a fulgerite, solidified lightning strike: So my rock hounding itch was scratched 🙂 Now camp is always a treat in the mornings and evenings but I also mentioned I kept myself entertained on days when I was not finding much. Aside from just enjoying nature and walking Kays getting no where on the gold a few days of yabbie fishing made for a great reliefe after catching the skunk. I visited various dams nearby and treated myself to a Yabbie feast on many evenings. So all in all a great time, good eats and nice finds. If you want to go my suggestion is : Make a Plan and stick to it. You wont be dissapointed. There were a great many other things that occured but like I said, a short story. Regards and go live the dream. Next year who knows..... I'm thinking opal or sapphires myself with a little gold and yabbie. Thanks for reading, DD
  14. Reg Wilson is a bit of a legend in Australian detecting circles and has kept a comprehensive photo collection of his finds over 4 or 5 decades. Now everyone likes gold images and stories - and there are plenty here! I've been offered existing topics to post on, but I believe the topic deserves its own thread to do it full justice. All images are those of Reg Wilson unless otherwise attributed. The album consists of hundreds of photographs of not only gold, but many gold detecting industry characters, some of whom are no longer with us, but who all contributed in their own unique ways to the great gold chase we still enjoy today. Firstly, a bit of background. Reg first shot to international fame with the finding of this 98 ounce piece which he named the "Orange Roughie" in 1987, decades later to be fraudulently rebirthed as the "Washington Nugget" By no means his first find, Reg was already a successful detector operator and at the time was testing a prototype GT 16000 for Minelab's wizz kid engineer Bruce Candy: Photo: Australian Sun Herald L to R: Bruce Candy, the late Doug Robertson, Ian Jacques, Reg, John Hider Smith. Reg recalled: "The man standing next to Bruce Candy is the late Doug Robertson, who with his brother Bruce worked the aluvials below the famous and fabulously rich Matrix reef at McIntyres. They had an old Matilda tank with a blade attached to clear Mallee scrub. Between them they had a wealth of knowledge of the northern Victorian gold fields. (Doug's name may have been Robinson. Memory is a bit foggy)" Ian, Reg and John were prototype SD 2000 testers in Victoria, AU and were collectively known as the "Beagle Boys" a name bestowed upon them by Dave Chappel, the publican of the Railway Hotel Dunolly. On any Friday night huge nuggets, some weighing well over a hundred ounces could be seen displayed on the bar. 120oz from Longbush. Found all on its own, finder anonymous: The playing cards and US currency indicate that the nugget has just been purchased by the late "Rattlesnake" John Fickett, a US gold buyer who bought many of the big pieces back then: Ian Jacques and Reg with 44 oz 1989: Ian Jacques with his SD 2000 prototype late 80's. Real prospectors don't use bungees All for now, but at least we've made a start - - -
  15. Steve Herschbach

    Great Gold & Australia Photos

    I like some of the creative photography experiments here with gold nuggets and more.... https://www.instagram.com/goldsweeper/
  16. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFgzy3yZCA1FdeJcOEbOYMQ/videos Just thought i would post this up, i have been watching his clips for a while now, He is the most prolific gold finder with the monster i have seen, certainly shows how good the monster is at pinging those specimens and tiny flakes. I have been loving the posts by Kiwijw & Phrunt who have been doing well with the monster in NZ but i haven't seen much of the monster in Australia and more in the more mineralised ground until i came across this guy. Cheers,
  17. First Class trip w/ my Mate' Tony! Enjoy! Ig
  18. I was going through my computer looking at different stuff that I had forgotten I had and I came across this shortcut to the archives of Gold Net Australia. Gold Net Australia Online went from 1999 to 2002 and remarkably, it`s still there. Probably not of great interest to people in the States, but if you enjoy reading about coil developement from 20 yrs ago, or accommodation, or a review of the GP Extreme, or divining rods, or storys of big finds or just pictures of beaut nuggets, there might be something here of interest. http://www.gold-net.com.au/archives.html
  19. RobboChasingYella

    Newbie From Australia

    G'day fellas and ladies. Glad to join another informative group. I'm from Victoria and have been detecting since October 2017. Still clueless really. I have decided recently that I need to expand mu hunt for the elusive yellow metal. I want to learn to chase the gold by panning and trace it to a lead or source. Just detecting isn't cutting the mustard. I've had a dry spell now since Australia Day. In total since Ive began I have found just shy of half an ounce. But last 6 or 7 trips up to the GT have yielded nada. Thanks for letting me in to this group. Good luck in ya hunts and may the gold gods shine favourably upon you
  20. Interesting as we normally see gold nugget videos from Oz. The finds remind me of what you would see in California gold country.
  21. Jonathan Porter

    My First Equinox Silvers

    I don't do a lot of coin shooting, its not because I'm not interested, its because I literally live on a gold field so its actually easier for me to go find a nugget than it is to go find coins. Clermont the town I live in has a colourful past with gold being discovered here in the 1860's, so some of the coins to be had are quite old by Australian standards. Clermont also suffered from a massive flood in 1916 that killed over 60 people whilst they slept, this happened because the town had been built on the flats beside Hoods Lagoon an ancient river channel that is now a water hole, Hoods lagoon is away from the main present day water courses that flow past Clermont (the confluence of Sandy and Wolfang creeks). When both creeks get major flooding upstream (in the case of the 1916 flood it was due to a cyclone crossing the coast 300 kilometers away) the water backs up and flows out over the flats, in 1916 it backed up so far the water ended up inundating the town completely (some say 10 to 15 feet). The tragedy was further compounded because it not only happened in the middle of the night when people were in their beds asleep but also flash flooded at tremendous speed. For those interested I've included a couple of links to recent newspaper articles marking the centenary. ABC news article ABC news article 2 I have a good friend Paul who is mad on coin detecting, especially wading in the surf. He has an advantage in the surf because he looks like he's about 10 feet tall (obviously an exaggeration) so can wade deeper than most with some amazing finds for his efforts. He and I often go gold detecting together and on occasion we go on a coin shoot, the fact I had the Equinox 800 to play with was a good incentive on a 40 degree Celsius day, so out we went while it was still coolish targeting an area he had scoped out on previous occasions. The area he selected was near the banks of Hoods lagoon and was selected because the old town was once there but also more importantly the size of the gum trees told him they were old enough to have been there providing shade for people trying to escape the heat of summer. People like to lay down in the shade, they also place articles of value at the base of trees when they go for a swim, so the immediate areas around the bases of old gum trees are prime locations for coins. Paul having a play with the Equinox I have not even tried the EQ in the coin modes (other than having a bit of fun with Field mode when I was out prospecting, but that's another story) so you can consider me to be an absolute new chum, all I did was set the threshold tone to my liking and put the Tones on 50 using the Park mode. I wondered off from were Paul was digging up a 1 cent piece (he rubbed in the fact he had the first coin for the session, so it was game on). Now to be fair to Paul he did kind of "lead me" to the path of silverness and I was making him use an Xterra 705 as his CTX was back on the coast on lone to a friend. Sure enough in no time I had a sweet signal that screamed "dig me", it's funny how metal detecting for non-ferrous has a universal language even coming from my "Gold Prospecting" background. To me the signal sounded very sweet and mellow with the target ID complimenting what I was hearing, even though the dirt in Clermont is highly mineralised (it is a Gold Field after all) the Equinox 800 just purred along. My first Silver with the Equinox 800, a 1931 Shilling This coin would have been lost long after the 1916 floods but was still a decent find in my books, especially considering I'd only just turned the detector on. By this stage poor old Paul was a little distracted, I don't know who was more pumped him or me, he sure covered some territory with those stomping long legs of his as he hot footed it over when I screamed I had a silver coin. We shot the breeze for a bit, probably one of the highlights of this type of detecting with a good friend and definately more sociable than gold detecting where you have to keep miles away from each to avoid interference. Getting back to it I then pinged onto another "good" sounding target only inches away (the EQ really does makes a stand out signal on silver that's for sure), this time my second coin for the morning popped out of the ground. 1920 Six Pence I've really enjoyed being involved with the Equinox, its well outside my normal scope of detecting which I found challenging, being away from my comfort zone has helped me to grow in ways I had not expected as a long term gold specific metal detectorist. Tapping back into my roots chasing high frequency gold has also been extremely rewarding, I'm really looking forward to the coming months as others start to talk about their experiences with this brilliant detector. JP
  22. vanursepaul

    Minelab Zeq "zeke"

    Can't wait to get rolling with the newest Minelab..... ZEQ I will call it 'Zeke' for short and I have a feeling I will SMASH those FNQ boys when we are detecting the sides of washes... I will be able to detect them all day long now! They are in for a 'new and improved' Yank this year.... Normally when we get to the honey hole they have picked for the day, we get off the motorcycles and/or ATV and get our gear situated, That is when Dale does his mandatory calls to arms... with his detector raised high in the air----and after checking left and right .....He lets out a mighty bellow !!!!!!ATTACK!!!!!! And off we go... Now Norvic was a little more laid back than that, but I cant tell you all his secrets war cries because he is starting to listen too closely to Bada Bing and I am afraid he may institute culling in his area if I dont behave here and keep all the secrets close.. Have a blessed New Years everyone!---- Can you tell I am already starting to get psyched about going back? I cant wait. Fred I havent even been back out but i gotta go soon... I have been at the hospital on everyone of my days off trying to get my VA claim put together.
  23. There was a recent find of a 117 ounce gold nugget in the Mt Monger area, south-east of Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Western Australia. Unfortunately so far I have only been able to find one very poor photo of it. What's up with that? The nugget is a bit different in that it is pretty long at 20" and narrow instead of a round lump. http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/regional/goldfields/a/20549863/faith-of-colleen-on-loan-to-museum/ Anybody have more information on how it was found or a better photo? I did find a photo on Facebook purporting to be the same nugget but I do not think it is.
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