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Steve Herschbach

Lots Of Gold Found With The White's TDI

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Back around 2008 I was involved with the use of the White's TDI in a very big way at my mine at Moore Creek, Alaska. I made various posts at locations around the internet on our success with the TDI but never did get around to collecting it all together in one place. Until now. I just made a belated entry on Steve Mining Journal titled White's TDI at Moore Creek, Alaska - Summer 2008. Lots of gold nugget stories and photos there - check it out.

Also added a page about the TDI itself I am still working on but a ton of information there at White's PulseScan TDI Metal Detector already so went ahead and posted it.

whites-tdi-gold-nuggets-found-f.jpg.7d6b
0.31 ounce Gold Specimen found with White's TDI

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Steve, that is a nice "sandwich" piece, typical of quite a few from Ganes and Moore Creeks as you well know. I really like those type specimens, Bob

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Does anyone know if the TDI Pro is still in production? The Whitws website says "out of stock" - but it also says you have to get it from a local dealer.

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Yes, they are still in production. Whites only sells it through dealers and their website only has a setting for "out of stock". They really need to fix that. I will remind them as they are aware of it but it has not been fixed. They are in stock and available through TDI certified dealers.

Just my opinion but I think White's makes it too hard to buy a TDI.

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Hi

 

what's the difference between the pro and the sl?

Other than the stock coil, are there any other coils that are useful in certain applications?

 

Thanks

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What shop do you own whylee? OK to give yourself a plug here! Then I can come visit.

The SL is very light at only 3.5 lbs and very well balanced. It is one of those detectors that feels good on my arm. The battery pack was dropped down below optimum to allow for a 12V AA battery pack and noise suppression engaged to create a more stable threshold. This all adds up to a less expensive, smoother operating nice and light detector, but one that gives up a bit of an edge in depth. Honestly not enough to matter to most people but it admittedly disappointed some people who had a TDI and were looking for more power, not less. I had a TDI SL myself and really liked it but I could not get over the feeling I was giving up that 1/4" I wanted. So I sold it and got another standard TDI. Don't read too much into that though. Digger Bob, a real TDI guru, prefers his TDI SL.

Coils is kind of a personal thing but I really like the 7.5" coil almost more than the 12" coil myself. I may have to pick another one up. Can't really say you need one though. I just like smaller coils for poking around.

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thanks Steve

 

Watched both Digger Bob's video's. really good. So there is actually 3 tdi's, the TDI, TDI PRO, and the SL.

I,m thinking about a trip to Arizona/California next fall and I have the GMT but thinking the TDI would be a good weapon to add.

There is suppose to be a new non Minelab PI coming out of Australia shortly. Suppose to be a new concept in Pi's, so waiting to see if it materializes before I make the plunge. Not the QED. See what happens. Might be a repeat of the Pulse Devil story, although Mr Emory just applied for another patent.

 

Really enjoying your new forum! Lots of great info.

 

Cheers

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What shop do you own whylee? OK to give yourself a plug here! Then I can come visit.

 

The SL is very light at only 3.5 lbs and very well balanced. It is one of those detectors that feels good on my arm. The battery pack was dropped down below optimum to allow for a 12V AA battery pack and noise suppression engaged to create a more stable threshold. This all adds up to a less expensive, smoother operating nice and light detector, but one that gives up a bit of an edge in depth. Honestly not enough to matter to most people but it admittedly disappointed some people who had a TDI and were looking for more power, not less. I had a TDI SL myself and really liked it but I could not get over the niggling feeling I was giving up that 1/4" I wanted. So I sold it and got another standard TDI. Don't read too much into that though. Digger Bob, a real TDI guru, prefers his TDI SL.

 

Coils is kind of a personal thing but I really like the 7.5" coil almost more than the 12" coil myself. I may have to pick another one up. Can't really say you need one though. I just like smaller coils for poking around.

  I own Eureka Prospecting Supplies, I do all my Detectors from my home office for now. You can come by anytime my number is 775-846-6357. I will be setting up a rack in the shop for them soon. I carry Minelab, Whites, Fisher, Garrett, Tesoro and normally have all the Gold detectors in stock.

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  I own Eureka Prospecting Supplies, I do all my Detectors from my home office for now. You can come by anytime my number is 775-846-6357. I will be setting up a rack in the shop for them soon. I carry Minelab, Whites, Fisher, Garrett, Tesoro and normally have all the Gold detectors in stock.

 

OK, thanks. So you must be Ken Walls? I will look you up for sure and see what you have. That way I know where to send people - I try and support the local guy.

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