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Found 66 results

  1. nuggetnewbie

    Newbie Question

    Never been prospecting before. I found an area that has gold history but i don't know how to find out who owns the land if anybody. It is just outside a National Forest which I'm pretty sure is ok to detect on but not sure about the area just outside. Any tips would help!
  2. So I did a search and didn't find what I was after. What I would like to figure out is how to find old places to coin shoot. I guess parks would be a easy point to start. 1. How to find the age of a place. 2. How to find old places that might be abandoned or reused. 3. General techniques of selecting a place to look for old coins. Example I live in Reno with Steve ( probably why I don't find good nuggets or coins). Steve got some great coins as of late and I can't find older than 70 decade. Now I could go to tahoe but that is a drive and I would like a few local spots to take my kids that like treasure hunting, that is what they call it. So I tried figuring it out, no dice. I don' mind doing the work, just need the formula. I was hoping that the veteran shooters had a method to their research and selection process. Thanks for the help.
  3. I have four books that I’m going to give away with all from 1972. All you have to do is just let me know that you want your name in the pot. I’ll put a number by your name and then put the number only in the pot and draw a winner out. This comtest will end 9 June at 6 PM CST. I will ship free to your address. Chuck
  4. This is pretty neat stuff, and I think the applications for prospectors and relic hunters are obvious... http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140103-new-england-archaeology-lidar-science/
  5. We are going to be moving to Tinker AFB, OK in June, but in the meantime, while still based on Eglin AFB, FL, I have been researching old, now demolished family housing areas to hunt before we leave. I have discovered a major housing area, where all the homes were built between 1955 and 1962. Still standing in 1969, but now demolished and open fields. Very easy to research using NETRonline Historic Aerials against current Google Satellite maps. The kicker of this area is that it is on-base, and due to very restricted access, these fields are very likey virgin for hunting. I expect a lot of silver, wheaties and more in the front areas of these homes, as well as the always-open fields behind the housing circles, where kids would play, and parties held. Only hunting them will prove out my theory, but I have four remaining weeks at Eglin to find what I can! Here are the Aerial vs. current satellite pics. After we leave, I hope someone into MD'ing will be assigned to Eglin and find this post. (Of course, I hope I've already recovered ALL the silver!! LOL)
  6. Gold Prospecting with a VLF Metal Detector by Dave Johnson Chief Designer, First Texas Products & Fisher Research Labs March 2010 Edition This book explains how to use a VLF metal detector for finding gold. The author has nearly 30 years’ experience in the metal detector industry working for several different companies, and designed several of the most popular “gold machines” on the market. These include the Tesoro Lobo, White's GMT and MXT, and of course the Fisher Gold Bug and Gold Bug 2. Although the product emphasis is on the machines currently “Made in El Paso”, the features of competitors’ machines are also discussed. This booklet is useful no matter what brand of metal detector you use. pdf download 29 pages http://www.fisherlab.com/Hobby/davejohnson/DavesGoldbook-reders.pdf ready to print booklet version http://www.fisherlab.com/Hobby/davejohnson/DavesGoldbook-printer.pdf You can find this and many more useful free books on this website at the Metal Detecting & Prospecting Library
  7. I’d said something about going to a Treasure Show this weekend and I’m back with a new book on Equinox Series Detector. I haven’t had a lot of time to read over it but did take time to scan it. With that said you want to know what I think of the book. All I will say is spend the money to get a pirinted copy of the instruction manual for the Equinox. Then spend the time reading it and when you’re not sure about something read it over again. Chuck
  8. I was going through my computer looking at different stuff that I had forgotten I had and I came across this shortcut to the archives of Gold Net Australia. Gold Net Australia Online went from 1999 to 2002 and remarkably, it`s still there. Probably not of great interest to people in the States, but if you enjoy reading about coil developement from 20 yrs ago, or accommodation, or a review of the GP Extreme, or divining rods, or storys of big finds or just pictures of beaut nuggets, there might be something here of interest. http://www.gold-net.com.au/archives.html
  9. I've seen these books recommended here and elsewhere. I'd like more info on them, and my web searching has only led to confusion. My observations: 1) these books were not widely distributed; 2) they are out-of-print; 3) they are not cheap. I know several of you are familiar with these works. Could you explain the differences among the editions? If I'm going to spend as much or more on these as I do on coils I'd like to avoid duplicate purchases. Thanks in advance.
  10. tboykin

    Brazilian Gold

    Bom dia! I had the unique opportunity thanks to my job at White’s to do some work in Brazil and wanted to share some pictures from our trip. First things first, ouro! The soil here is nasty. Even the most expensive PIs struggle to balance out the mineralization. Add the humidity, 120 degree heat, and blazing sun and you have a great area to challenge a gold detector. Garimpeiros make their living off the gold they find. Some are dangerous but most of the ones we met were friendly enough to talk about gold and detectors. Just don’t get between them and their gold unless you want to disappear in the jungle. One of the places we went that was “hunted out” gave up a chunky rock that was just a whisper of a signal. When we cracked it open we found this tiny crystalline nugget. After breaking the tiny tree nugget off I could see that the gold continues down into the rock. Sad to be leaving but I made some new friends while working in the Brazilian sun. -T
  11. Big Nuggets Bob

    NW Montana Gold?

    Recently moved to the Kalispell area, does anyone know anything about historical mining in this area, prospecting clubs, etc?
  12. Prospecting & Mining Reference Materials Check out the University of North Texas Digital Library website https://digital.library.unt.edu Use the search engine at the very top of the UNT page to search the library. The library has loads of various documents regarding “gold” including mining/milling, mineral deposits, tertiary channels, geology throughout the Western United States and Alaska. For those of you interested in the California Southern Mother Lode check out the minerals industries surveys of the California Mother Lode including Calaveras County (part 1) and Tuolumne and Mariposa Counties (part 2) by Julihn & Horton 1938/1940: Mineral Industries Survey of the United States: California, Calaveras County, Mother Lode District (South). Mines of the Southern Mother Lode Region. Part 1 -- Calaveras County Mineral Industries Survey of the United States, California: Tuolumne and Mariposa Counties, Mother Lode District (South). Mines of the Southern Mother Lode Region, Part 2 -- Tuolumne and Mariposa Counties Hardpack
  13. USGS Professional Paper 610 by A. H. Koschmann and M. H. Bergendahl - A description of the geology, mining history, and production of the major gold-mining districts in 21 states. This 1968 publication obviously lacks the latest production figures but it still is a great overview to where an individual prospector can look for gold in the United States. It is a huge 283 page pdf download so be patient! Pay particular attention to the listed references in the extensive bibliography for doing further research. I have the original out-of-print hardback but what I paid for you get for free! You can download this at http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0610/report.pdf and find many more useful free books on this website at the Metal Detecting & Prospecting Library
  14. I know a lot of you are waiting for the new updated Land Matters Mining Claims Maps. That update should have been available on Monday but the BLM is having some technical difficulties with its Secure Transfer Server and we have been unable to update the active mining claims information on our maps. Our contact at the BLM says the problem has been identified and should be corrected tonight. We should be able to access the data in the morning. I know this is a critical map update for a lot of our users. I'll post here as soon as the maps are updated.
  15. I am very interested in pocket hunting. There is not a lot of info on the net about this subject but what there is I think I have studied most of it. Where I feel deficient in my pocket hunting education is old petrology terminology. It seems like over the last 100 years there have been many changes in the names of rocks and minerals. Following is an excerpt from the Canadian GPEX gold forum which may help to illustrate the problems which beset the modern prospector when he tries to decipher what the old-timers were saying. "The chemical or mineral composition of this pocket formation is generally silica, lime, soda, alumina, potash, copper, lead, magnesia, iron, gold, quartz and water, although these conditions differ in each locality. (Here I note a problem in terminology. The author uses 19th century mineral terms that I have difficulty translating. Calcite was not used in those days, but the term for it he used was lime, so I substituted calcite in places for today's readers. Soda and potash may have referred to sodium and potassium feldspars, but I'm guessing here. Magnesia may have been magnesite, MgCO. I don't know what the contemporary equivalent for alumina is. He interchanged terms for elements with those for minerals, so the particular minerals containing lead, sulfur and copper may have been understood by his contemporaries, but I don't know what he meant. Chloride puzzles me. Chloride had a meaning among mining men in those days that is no longer used and leaves me mystified)" Hopefully someone with experience in this area will school us prospectors that lack the ability or knowledge to translate the old terminology into a more modern one. I don't believe I am the only prospector who thirsts for this knowledge or could benefit from publication of it. Thanks, Merton
  16. Gosh it's that time again. Spring has sprung across all the states and prospecting is going into full swing for the season. Land Matters updated their Mining Claims Maps last Friday morning. We also updated them on the 15th of May and May 1 and April 15 - you get the idea. In any case Land Matters always provides the most up to date claims mapping available at any price. We serve up thousands of these maps every hour and those numbers keep growing so I know folks are getting their prospecting mojo on with the help of Land Matters. That's a good thing! We've got some new tools coming soon to make your research even easier and more productive. Keep an eye out for those updates soon. For those of you who are Claims Advantage Members you may have noticed there has been a significant change to one of the most famous mining districts in California. New ground opening up for the first time since 1890. This is a major opportunity for any serious prospector. Here's the number of claims closed so far this mining year: Land matters has provided maps of all those 27,127 Closed Claims for our Claims Advantage Members.
  17. I just finished reading "The Civil War Writings" by this man. If you are a civil war relic hunter I think these personal memoirs of A. Bierce might have some excellent leads to locations. One his duties was battle field cartographer ... he does not glorify war at all Steve, not sure which forum you fit this too...if any. fred
  18. W. Dan Hausel has an interesting article in the April edition of the ICMJ's Prospecting and Mining Journal... well worth reading and not the only one worth your money. fred
  19. Bob has written a great article with a lot of show and tell. Bob talks about Oroville Dam with lots of pictures of it and gold he's found plus others too. I'm sure it's other great stories in it but I pulled it off the rack just because Bob pretty face was on the front. Chuck
  20. Digger Jones

    Favorite Gold Book

    I would really like to hear anyone's thoughts on their favorite gold book(s). Not necessarily just metal detecting but any aspect of gold, weather it be detecting of, geology of, or historical, which I find really fascinating, but just any favorite books on the subject, from any country and any time, all input is appreciated! Cheers Digger
  21. I have not even scratched the surface of this website link. All kinds of diverse articles and photos from all over the country. There are many photos of legends in the prospecting world. I tripped over this site years ago, forgot about it, and then found it again yesterday while doing research. Check it out at http://www.billandlindaprospecting.com/
  22. If anyone is interested, here are 21 books on meteorites in pdf Download link Dave
  23. To start I do not have access to a computer where I live I only have access when I run down to the valley of Arizona to visit my sisters,family and friends which is maybe once every couple of months, i am pretty much a recluse as far as the way I live I have a dog I talk to 99.9% of the time that keeps me company he never talks back and he's always by my side he would probably give his life for me if I were in danger and I would mine for him he's like a brother that doesn't speak. But any how my question is this how would I go about researching an area to find out if it could passably have gold or could someone tell me if there has ever been any gold found near Young Arizona again I do not have access to a PC 99% of the time and i do not go to library's and I will be heading back to where I live tomorrow Thanks for any replies and helpful advice
  24. Steve Herschbach

    Handbook Of Mineralogy

    The Handbook of Mineralogy series is a Five Volume set authored by John W. Anthony, Richard A. Bideaux, Kenneth W. Bladh, and Monte C. Nichols, and published by Mineral Data Publishing. Each mineral known at the time of publication occupies one page of the handbook. In 2001 the copyright for the Handbook of Mineralogy was given to the Mineralogical Society of America by Kenneth W. Bladh, Richard A. Bideaux, Elizabeth Anthony-Morton and Barbara G. Nichols and the remaining volumes were shipped to the MSA warehouse in Chantilly, VA. Along with the copyright, MSA was given pdf files of each page of the handbook. These 4330 pdf mineral descriptions are freely distributed to the public on this website.
  25. Arizona Locations New Mexico Locations
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