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Steve Herschbach

Half Sine Metal Detector Technology - Hybrid Induction Balance / Pulse Induction Metal Detector

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On 5/22/2015 at 8:24 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

Ray, I made the 10K thing up to illustrate the point of such a detector being desirable. I have no idea when or if such a detector will appear, or what it will cost.

On the other hand if I could get my hands on a PI that discriminated to full depth for 10K I estimate I could pay for it with gold found in less than two weeks at several locations I know of.

if i read between the lines correctly, are you saying you you've avoided some areas with known gold because the gold to trash ratio means too much digging of trash.

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Not avoided, no. Just that right now you are going to dig 100 trash targets to get a nugget. If you could get that down to 10 trash targets or less to get the nugget - without the depth loss penalty - there would be some sweet detecting for a year or two.

Tailing piles are a big one. Large nuggets lurking deep down, but far more cans, steel plates, huge bolts - you name it. All deep. I have spent an hour or more on a single target I really thought would be gold, only to find a can. And be seriously wore out in the process.

Lots of old haunts in Alaska I would be revisiting post haste. Ganes Creek, Alaska was a classic situation. The VLF guys whipped the PI guys 99% of the time. I dug quite a few nuggets with my GPX that the VLF guys missed but in terms of gold per week the VLF people have a decided advantage in a situation like that.

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I think I would be second in line. :-) thanks steve for the explanation .

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I was reading on another forum that White's is testing a prototype detector in Australia. No details given just a statement. Anyone here know anything more?

 

Alan

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This patent has been updated and new patent US 9,285,496 B1 granted March 15, 2016

TRUNCATED HALF-SINE METHODS FOR METAL DETECTORS
Carl Moreland, Corvallis, OR (US)
Assigned to White's Electronics, Inc., Sweet Home, OR (US)

Abstract

This invention relates to a metal detector where a coil is used to transmit a periodic magnetic field to energize metal objects that are concealed and often buried or hidden in a matrix (ground) containing ferromagnetic minerals. There are many difficult and often simultaneous challenges, such as detecting large deep targets, detecting minutely small targets, identifying target properties, ignoring the ferromagnetic matrix, avoiding a net magnetic field which can trigger magnetic sensors in land mines, and ignoring conductive salt responses. Either time-domain or frequency domain methods have been used to address these challenges with mixed levels of success. The ability to simultaneously use time-domain and frequency-domain methods can expand detection capability. Techniques are presented for achieving these goals.

moreland-half-sine-patent.pdf

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Sounds good but I don't suppose they are taking pre-orders Yet?  

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So based on the updated patent White's must have some prototypes in the field and getting feedback for improvements.

I noticed a major change in the new patent is providing additional signalling and power switching networks that provide higher voltages to the higher frequency pulses to maintain the same half sine amplitude. Based on my reading the old patent provided for a constant voltage across the multiple frequency pulses which resulted in a lower amplitude half sine wave on the higher frequencies and caused a performance degradation.

I cannot fathom the computational processing necessary for maintaining different voltage levels for on micro-second pulses across multiple frequencies and varying these voltage levels based on the ground matrix readings. Also to have a power switching network that keeps up with this micro-second demand rate.  I think "Moore's Law" is becoming applicable to metal detector designs.

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On 5/21/2015 at 12:55 PM, Steve Herschbach said:

Well, we finally know what it is that Minelab was working on, and ZVT is not half sine technology. Rumor (sorry Chris) has it a new White's hybrid may be seen by year end? (Edit - note this post was in 2015) We will see.

Can you imagine having a PI that discriminated like a VLF? How much is something like that worth to people? Another 10K detector? I would be first in line.

Is that what NASA Tom is talking about here?

http://www.dankowskidetectors.com/discussions/read.php?2,152652,page=1

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The detector Tom introduced in his post is apparently different in its function than any other detector on the market.  There is reason to believe that it may be the work of Diimitar Gargov who formerly worked at Fisher in CA and then went to El Paso for a while after FT acquired the ”remains” of the “old” Fisher. 

No one has posted any info on what sort of signal generation system and target analysis it uses. Also unknown is where and by whom it will be manufactured.

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16 hours ago, ☠ Cipher said:

Is that what NASA Tom is talking about here?

http://www.dankowskidetectors.com/discussions/read.php?2,152652,page=1

Doubtful since the first post in this thread has a link to the White's patent on this particular methodology. It is not impossible the new detector is doing something similar but getting around the patent somehow.... no idea about that.

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