Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

I've been lurking and reading a while, and ended up purchasing a well-used GPX 5000 recently. After taking it out a few times, I have a question that feeds into a few other questions.

Is the detector supposed to react very loudly if it's tapped/bumped against bushes, rocks, etc? My assumption is "no," but I wanted to make sure I wasn't just experiencing something that's normal. 

By "react," I mean it beeps as if I've swung over something HUGE and metallic.

Assuming this is not normal - what are likely causes?

1. I've used two different coils with the same result.

2. I have the coil wire wrapped pretty tightly and secured with velcro wraps.

Could the problem be a loose/faulting coil connector into the control box?

Thanks for the help, and looking forward to learning more!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi! 

Mine reacts similarly for sure, but it's something to get used to. When you approach vegetation, proceed at a very patient pace compared to however you detect in the open. Some noise is sure to happen if you're careless even in the slightest when bumping and scraping across sticks and rocks. Also, be aware of bumping the cable near the control box with your leg as you swing and fatigue builds.

However, be assured that your detector will react appropriately if you happen to swing it over detectable gold in the midst of a hail of sticks. Just look for those repeatable loud tones that make you swing twice, three times, and as many more times you want to swing over it until you dig it up!

Unless of course, despite all the adjusting of settings, all the care in the world and a tightly plugged coil, your detector won't stop making baffling loud reactions. In that case, I'd recommend another attempt at an auto-tune/noise cancel and a readjustment of your volumes.

Hope your detector is alright and that this may help.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

contact minelab for exact information. i did not have those issues when i had my 5000. so much is speculative, go and ask the manufacture for the straight scoop.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you using the coin/relic soil/timing? DD coils or Mono?? I know that when I use coin/relic timing on soil that is more mineralized, you can not swing the coil without it reacting like there are large targets everywhere.  Try another timing and see if it helps.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Also make sure the cable is firmly attached to the shaft down near the coil, if you bump into things and the cable moves, that can set it off too. Also consider getting a cable guard that goes next to the box. As mentioned above, bumping the top end of the cable can set it off as well, and the guard protects the cable connector from being bent when you put the detector down on the ground.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont have that issue, and you shouldn't if you are in factory preset settings. I use somewhat hotter settings hunting but I would try the presets to see if it is responding as it should. I have also noticed that if items hit your cable, or if you have a loose cable loop that can move close to the coil, you may hear falsing. If you are close enough, have a dealer evaluate if it is working as it should, or minelab, that will answer your questions

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Minerjosh said:

I only experience this problem with my 10x5 coiltek joey mono coil. My commander coils and coiltek elite coils don't have this issue. 

Then it sounds like a bad coil to me. Even if it was good, coils and cables degrade. If the cable has a sort it can sometimes be located by wiggling the cable. If the fault is internal, like a loose winding, unless you are a wizard it’s done.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Then it sounds like a bad coil to me. Even if it was good, coils and cables degrade. If the cable has a sort it can sometimes be located by wiggling the cable. If the fault is internal, like a loose winding, unless you are a wizard it’s done.

@amitchia ... and there just happens to be some good and low-cost coil models for sale in the classifieds here now too- I especially liked the 8” mono.  It would be a good one to test, but also complement the other coils you already have if they are still good.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Then it sounds like a bad coil to me. Even if it was good, coils and cables degrade. If the cable has a sort it can sometimes be located by wiggling the cable. If the fault is internal, like a loose winding, unless you are a wizard it’s done.

Steve- can a coil with a loose winding be repaired by carefully injecting small amounts of expanding foam into it, or is the interior solid already? 🤔

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, GotAU? said:

Steve- can a coil with a loose winding be repaired by carefully injecting small amounts of expanding foam into it, or is the interior solid already? 🤔

Like I said, if you are a coil wizard...... I'm not. It all depends on the coil, and what really is wrong. If it is dead anyway it can't hurt to try something before it gets tossed. I have zero patience for a coil that misbehaves and do not trust that they are performing as they should, so unless they are under warranty I just toss them. After making sure it was not the cable etc. etc.

If you work in water or wet environments water intrusions can create issues. My favorite old Nugget Finder 16" mono was an old style fiberglass model. Microfractures build up and allow water intrusion, and the coil eventually got flaky from being used for weeks in rainy weather. Something like that might take a little baking to dry out. But I just got a new coil.

Think of the detector as the sports car. It needs quality accessories in good operating condition, like headphones and coils, to actually get the top performance.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • By schoolofhardNox
      I went back to my silver beach, as I had a fairly good feeling this part of the beach would not change much. It did not and I had a very good day. Spent 7 hours there with the GPX, dug all signals including iron and finally called it quits when my brain said GO HOME! The number of signals in a short span was unreal. I spent some of my time just detecting from my knees, since I could get 4 or 5 signals in very close proximity to the signal I was digging. Most of the time just inches away. Total coin count I believe was 150. 18 silvers, all copper pennies but 1 zinc, so I put that with the trash picture. It ruined my perfect copper penny day and I refuse to put it next to them. 😄 4 Buffalo Nickels showed up, as well as 1 Indian Head Cent, a Standing Liberty Quarter, and a Barber Dime (a rarity on this beach).  Also, a nice little locket which I am unsure if it's solid gold or gold filled.  It has a 14 stamped on the inside with a maker’s symbol that looks like a variation of Neptune’s 3-pronged spear (Trident). I saw no indication of peeling of the gold, so I am cautiously optimistic I found gold. Of course, with the type of hunting I do, there was lots of junk as well. Got my exercise in for the week and plan on hitting it again soon.  Weather was rather nice and sunny, just shy of cold. No matter how old you are, the kid in us still has to play! 🙂






    • By schoolofhardNox
      So I'm still trying to milk the same cow 😄 I figured until it stops spitting silver on me, I will continue to ask for it. Long day at the beach 8:30-5:00, but the weather was decent, as I dress well for the cold. I'm getting to be a delicate flower in my advancing years 🤔 I'm using the GPX all day for this hunt and digging select areas and removing all iron so I can hear the deep targets.I hit a patch that started producing exclusively wheat pennies, so I knew that the chance for silver was very possible.  It did produce some silver but the ratio was mostly pennies. Moving over just a bit, the wheats turned into memorials and the clad followed as well. Not a bad day with 8 silvers, but I worked harder than usual for it.The beach is slowly sanding in and the easy stuff is gone. No gold again, but switching the timings on the GPX did start getting me a lot of nickels, including a handful of Buffalo. Jewelry was missing as usual, but the spoons sure weren't lacking 🙄 So here is everything I dug. Lots of junk too. It was great to get out and enjoy the hobby.



    • By Dances With Doves
      That  is a lot of money to spend where their are not to many nugget spots .Will it help relic hunters in hot ground over the other PI machines ?

    • By Jin
      Thanks to James Beatty for mentioning this Russian site that shows pictures of the 6000"s internal circuit board.
      https://md-arena.com/razborka-minelab-gpx-6000-chto-vnutri-ochen-dorogoj-novinki/?fbclid=IwAR2q9Cll560LUXoC0arxPr8zDALHI-5LLDM0S5zCeLUJYs--_d9KraNCIq0
      I was reading the comments (translated) and noticed that Steve and his comrads are held in high regards in Russia as well.🙂
      Quote: The circuitry of this device and me, too, "amazed to the core"! Made "very good" (really good, no kidding!), BUT why done - absolutely incomprehensible! (SIXTEEN (!) IMPAD / Pirates "In one bottle" !!! IT'S COOL !!!) It will be interesting to know what The "result" of using this technology in real search? I think that Steve Hershbach "and his comrades" will discuss this device and will experience "the full program" - this is their "theme".
    • By Steve Herschbach
      I tripped over this by accident while looking for info. Looks like a simple brochure handout, and what is interesting is the GPX 4500/5000 is missing in action.
      This might be Africa only, as the old GPX models are now so commonly counterfeited there. The best way for Minelab to address counterfeiting is to not let old models exist for too long, and the GPX 5000 is an ancient design at this point in time. I also suspect that there are increasing issues surrounding the shipping of that massive Li-Ion battery. Long story short, I can see why Minelab would want to discontinue the old GPX models
      The U.S. is a bit unique in the number of GPX 5000 used by relic and beach hunters, which might keep it viable here for longer than might be the case elsewhere. The GPX 4500 has long been rumored to be on its last legs, but it continues to be listed for sale. Plus, issues surrounding counterfeit detectors are far less severe here than overseas.
      Still, in the long run it makes sense to discontinue the older GPX models eventually, since the GPX 6000 is a clean break from the earlier designs, with no carryover of coils or other accessory items. This little brochure hints at a probable future without the GPX 4500/5000.

    • By Gerry in Idaho
      One of my customers in AZ forwarded this pic to me.  Looks to be the end of the box from a GPX-6000.

      Interesting to read what Geo Sensing Technology is.  I realize this does not go into detail, but it's a start.

      I'm quite impressed with the about statements
      - detect in different environments once thought undetectable.
      - suppresses unwanted signals via 3 overlapping feedback systems.
      - super fast detecting of all gold pieces.
      - GPX-6000 is in tune with you and the earth
      Best for last- ALL GOLD, ALL SOILS, ALL THE TIME.
      Your thoughts please?
      PS.  Thanks Ray for sharing the pic.
      If you are thinking about the GPX-6000, www.gerrysdetectors.com has been been around selling/using Minelabs for 20+ yrs.  

×
×
  • Create New...