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mn90403

News For Paul -- It Is Still Out There In WA !

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I think from my tilt on that article, nugget is a "ring in" from Victoria, bit of promotion by a journo. Each year Queensland goldfields are being over run in winter by hopeful prospectors from south of the border, I keep telling them, no gold here is all down where they come from.

Gold fever is remarkable, I remember a fellow years back made it known he got a nice piece in a certain location just down the road a bit, a few weeks later there was standing room only, property owner shut down giving permission to enter  etc etc. Hopeful operators come from all over, all no doubt passing over 1000s of ounces at top speed in their haste.

You`d make a good living with a mobile pub following these hot tips..................... 

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I knew you would pick up on 'the picture for excitement and the location and number of licenses' as promotional nonsense.

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Yeah gold chasing is the same all over OZ, it is important for all sorts of local businesses in rural AU., suspect is the same over the pond in your neck of the woods. Plenty of hype, bit of gold found but plenty of life experience and adventure for travelers. Why not tis life, go out and soak in It, as Paul says' "start another chapter".

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Actually, the State of California has been in a 'discourage prospectors' mode for many years.  They have restricted mining (dredging) and prospecting (high-banking) in and near waterways for some time.  State parks don't allow metal detecting of any kind. Some old time 49er areas are limited to gold panning only and some will not allows pans!  The State has encouraged legislation to restrict our federal rights in many of our open areas by making monuments, species (plant and animal) encroachment laws, relic restrictions and other reasons to restrict mineral entry.

Arizona and Nevada are much more prospector friendly than here.  That being said there are still many places to see and go.  One can still stake a claim on federal lands.

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Similar here most of our State governments are not fossicker friendly, a lot of ground is taboo and QLD in particular have crazy Fossicking Laws that have the gun loaded against the prospector. However many of our local rural governments are prospector & traveller friendly.eg The Mareeba Shire I live in welcomes RVers, grey nomads, prospectors etc and have a large area set aside for them to camp in at very cheap rates, even have an annual Christmas in July celebration (travelers come up this way in our winter thus July). This attitude brings business and helps rural economies.

Paul can fill you in on what I`m on about as in his travels downunder he has seen some of the craziness that exists in our "Laws" and how they  create "friction" between property owners and prospectors in particular.

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Hey Mitchel, how about you whoop me up some of those maps for Arizona.  LOL.  That is some good info you put together, there.

Andy 

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This might be the last news before Paul leaves.  I hope it helps but I think all of these nuggets are too small for him to target.

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/nxgold-announces-results-of-initial-mapping-program-and-more-gold-discovered-680651981.html 

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