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LOL, Funny this subject has come up I just bought 3 sets of long johns, I tried those cheap chemical hand warmer where you click a disc inside it and they get hot, Well one of them died after being used once leaving me with 3 left just to annoy me, So earlier this year  I bought 8 of the Larger Heat Wave versions Made in the U.S.A. I think these people are the company who came up with the Idea, But I bought these because my CG Parka has pockets near the Kidney area so you can fit hand warmers to protect vital areas, It should of come with them but for some reason it didn't

I have some Very serious Cold Weather gear, I have The Alaskan Extreme Cold weather parka by Alpha which is tougher and stiffer than the Nylon Parka's they make, and then I bought the North Face McMurdo Parka, It's a great coat but does not allow for layering up in the arms and the wind blasts through the gaps between the fixings and the Fake fur ruff, So I threw down the Gauntlet and bought a Canada Goose Military version ( Navy Blue ) of their Snow Mantra Parka, the Snow Mantra costs about £1275.00 over here but I got mine a lot cheaper but it is a Bear of a Coat,

Getting fed up with cold feet I bought a pair of boots that are just way way OTT, I bought the Baffin Impact's rated to -148*f/-100*c lol,

I imported the Boots from the USA from this company and I think they are the best place to buy from and they were quicker and cheaper than any where else,  Excellent people to deal with and they have a massive range of boots. https://winterboots.com/baffin-impact-black-mens-extreme-winter-boots.html

 

Anyways, get your self some thin fleece gloves and then buy a set of thinsulate cheap skiing type gloves, that way the air gets trapped in between the layers, the good thing about thinsulate is that when it gets  wet it will still keep you warm where as Down will not, and DO NOT buy waterproof gloves because the Sweat can not get out and it will freeze causing you frostbite, where as non waterproof gloves are breathable and even though they get wet they will dry out and keep you warm.

Hope this helps,

John.

http://www.medicalsuppliesmarket.com/item/5503521/

This will cover most of what you want to know,

http://www.coolantarctica.com/Antarctica fact file/science/clothing_in_antarcticaUK.php

Snow Mantra 9501M_Navy.jpg

Baffin Impact.jpg

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Good stuff there John.....:smile:

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Thanks mate, I must admit I did go OTT but that was out of frustration, That North face Parka cost me about $500 US and although it is very warm the tight sleeves and the mega Hood failure drove me to buying the Snow Mantra, The factory rate it at -30 to -70*f and it is well known as the warmest coat on earth, but I won't wear it above 10* to 20*f because it is extremely warm,

I have dozens of extreme cold weather clothing links, Here is another good one,  https://commonsensehome.com/best-cold-weather-clothing/

Here is another Very good useful link about Gloves, https://andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/the_truth_about_gloves

This Wind Chill Chart is worth saving because although a lot of coats boots etc have extreme ratings throw in a bit of wind velocity and it doesn't take much to reach those limits. 

Wind_chill.png

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I spent a couple years in Nome...... Got to experience -65...... That'll make yer sphincter pucker.:blink:

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Nome has to be one of the coldest places on earth on a regular bases and Fairbanks is not any better,  Many must of died in the Gold Rush days not having the gear we have now,  Poor devils, No detectors, basic transport, simple clothing and the list goes on, I got seriously cold where I nearly lost my fingers back in the late 70's early 80's and I vowed that that would never happen again, I couldn't even remove my gloves,

A couple of years back I hit a good patch where the finds were thick and fast at a Victorian country House/Mansion and I had been outside for about 12/14 hours and I was covered in frost and Ice when I walked in the back door, It's very easy to loose track of time and the dangers you face when detecting in bad climate conditions, Since then I always take a good Stanley Flask with me and take a break every 3 hours or so, I just did a review of about a Dozen of Stanley's Flask's over on  PA, because Stanley released a new super heavy duty range this year and they are Awesome, and I found which of their products are top performers too. Having this gear makes winter detecting much more enjoyable that's for sure.

John. 

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In theory, if you used a hand warmer on your wrist, near where your pulse can be felt, this should warm the blood going to your fingers giving them some advantage. My sister made me a pair of wrist warmers, from old sweater sleeves cut off, and the cuff had a stitch such that the thumb went through the small hole and the palm the rest. This would hold a hand warmer in position pretty well if snug enough to do so.

I work outdoors and these wrist warmers cover the gap between jacket sleeve and glove that often gets cold air if not snow in there (one never slips or trips in rugged terrain when there's snow on the ground, right?). So before you toss out your old sweater or sweatshirt, or your kids if they've outgrown them (actually may be better as they'll hold closer), consider making wrist warmers to hold the hand warmer against your pulse point.

Just a thought... Now if you've got a plan for softening the soil so targets can be dug in winter, I'm all ears!

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Those XT Heat packs I bought would burn your wrists, they get well over 130*f, I had a bad shoulder earlier this year and I used one but I had to wrap it up in a towel because they just get too hot.

It's getting colder here next week so winter is on it's way, :huh:

John.

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18 minutes ago, auminesweeper said:

Those XT Heat packs I bought would burn your wrists, they get well over 130*f, I had a bad shoulder earlier this year and I used one but I had to wrap it up in a towel because they just get too hot.

It's getting colder here next week so winter is on it's way, :huh:

John.

The "Heat Factory" ones I get from Costco don't run so hot, and last 5-6 hours. They're disposable. Package says to use them outside of the sock, so maybe that should be tried first. I've used them stuck to my feet under socks and the only discomfort was the big lump in my boot!

A box of 30 pair is about $15 or there abouts.

It snowed again (Minnesnowta) today but didn't stick much anywhere. Might see 40 this weekend but it'll be rainy they say. Hope to get out to detect some.

 

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I have not seen those, so are they not reusable then ? Mine last for a couple of hours, the cheap ones only last for less than an hour.

John.

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Winter has arrived already in the Yukon. I tried the other day detecting some now exposed gravel bars on the Yukon river running through Whitehorse but the surface has already frozen up. All that was recoverable was a Canadian quarter and a five of diamonds fishing lure sitting on the surface lol

Auminesweeper, the Snow Mantra is great eh! I've worked down to -45'c in mine, love it. But too hot above -15 for me. Was working for an airline in Yellowknife and we got an insane discount. Paid $150 off a paycheck back in 2000. Still a working jacket, it's built tough.

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