Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I will start by providing a little background information prior to the story I was given several years ago by a fellow treasure hunter.  His name was David Linville and he has since passed away.  And before you ask, I have his sister’s permission to use his name in the story. 

We were hunting one day and took a little break for a time because of the heat.  We were discussing treasure hunting in general and the times we had been metal detecting and how he always found more than I did.  All of a sudden he started giving me a story about some of his earlier ancestors that had moved from an undisclosed location.  They had moved to a small rural community named Gutton Park in Max Meadows, Virginia.  They had moved to this particular area hoping to obtain work and income to help during this particular era of the depression.  Jobs were not very numerous so people had to do many different kinds of work.  They had moved to this area hoping to prosper.  Of course, back in the 20s, 30s and 40s a lot of people had to plant gardens and raise livestock such as chickens, pigs…everyone knows the stories of what some of the older people had to do.  As the story went on he was telling me about something that happened with this particular man, he didn’t say if he was his grandfather or his uncle or who, just that they were related.  The gentleman that moved there was noticing one day that there were two horses under a tree, out in the field adjacent to their house that pawed the ground a lot.  Of course anyone that has been around farm animals know that to see a horse do that is not uncommon.  Nobody probably even knows why they do it on occasion.  As the days grew into weeks and more weeks went by he noticed that the horses were at the same place pawing the ground at the same location under the tree.  Curiosity finally overtook him and he decided he would cross the fence and walk down to where the tree was and see just exactly what had the horses so interested in this particular area.  As he crossed the fence the horses moved off to the side and the gentleman goes down and looks around on the ground.  There is no grass.  It is all pawed down to the dirt.  But he saw a glimmer of something shiny.  He looked down and saw what looked like one of the old zinc lids that some of the old timers put on their cans when they would can food.  So he reaches down to pick it up but it didn’t move.    So he takes his pocket knife out and cuts around the rim.  He proceeds to pull on the can lid again but it still wouldn’t move.  So he continues digging until he realized it was attached to a glass jar.  As the story continues, after several more tries he finally gets the jar loose enough to pull out of the ground.  It was a blue mason jar still attached to the lid and it was full of money.  Now as you might very well know any kind of pocket change that was found in the 40s or 50s, buried in a jar was all silver, except maybe for nickels and pennies.  As the story goes on, both David and his brother James confirmed that this particular jar of money was what it took to set this family back into a position to where they could survive without having to struggle. 

What I thought was really interesting, was the fact that this particular cache was found by paying attention to animals, not using a detector.  If the horses hadn’t pawed the ground the jar of money may still be in that same position today. 

The next time you go out hunting it might pay to look around a little.  Pay attention to the surroundings, imagine how life might have been in years past, you might just recover a cache of your own.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked your story. Thanks for posting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The power of observation is not to be take lightly. I think when they finally find Fenn's treasure there will be much gnashing of teeth as it will likely have been hidden in plain sight. 

Great story and I hope to be on the end of cache before my time is up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×