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wanderer

Small Nuggets Vs Big Nuggets

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5 hours ago, phoenix said:

I`ve got a speci I found maybe 30 yrs ago with a Whites GoldMaster that sg`s at 13 grams gold, I don`t believe there`s 13 grams in it but that`s what it sg`s at. Even though there is gold clearley visible, my GPX4000 cannot hear it, a gpx4500 cannot hear it and the GPX5000 can just barely hear it with a 8" Commander.  None of the new flat wound coils on the 5000 can hear it.   Both my 7000 and 2300 can hear it at 6 or 7 inches.   

cheers Dave

13 grammer.jpg

Gosh Dave...that is incredible.  13 grams. Unbelievable really :blink:....but I do believe you if you say so :biggrin:  I know one way to see if there is really 13 grams of gold. :laugh:. Cheers mate.

JW :smile:

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Hey JW.   Over the years I could have won a lot of money with this speci. Everybody that has ever seen it has informed me "of course I`m going to be able to hear that" and they are stunned when they can`t hear it.  One of them even asked me was I sure it was gold 😯  I don`t think he even believed me when I showed him that the 2300 and the 7000 could hear it clearly 😯😯😯       And mate I laughed when I read your suggestion there was one sure way to see how much gold there is in it. . While it`s mine, that aint ever going to happen. 🙂 cheers Dave

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It's almost worth starting a forum topic with undetectable gold finds where everyone can put photos of their bits :laugh:

I like my little undetectable bit, it's a nice looking piece.

 

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30 minutes ago, phoenix said:

And mate I laughed when I read your suggestion there was one sure way to see how much gold there is in it. . While it`s mine, that aint ever going to happen. 🙂 cheers Dave

I knew you never would. Can't blame you..... & I wouldn't either. That's for sure.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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3 hours ago, phrunt said:

It's almost worth starting a forum topic with undetectable gold finds where everyone can put photos of their bits :laugh:

I like my little undetectable bit, it's a nice looking piece.

 

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au/forum/viewtopic.php?id=23832&p=1

There's a whole thread on it here Phrunt.

There is a bit of bulldust amongst it but Moneybox's post # 41 is certainly worth a look. 

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Thanks Northeast, in amongst all the crap there was some good posts in there, The one moneybox put up with a photo of his scales showing a big bunch of undetectable gold was interesting, even the SDC2300 and Zed had trouble finding it.  Surprisingly that gold looks like my undetectable bit.  I can't wait to test my bit on John's Zed now that I know even it can struggle on some undetectable gold.  It's made its way to being my favourite bit of gold now :laugh:

It could even be why I am now the proud owner of that undetectable bit, John and I have detected together a fair bit, he uses his Zed mostly and I was mostly driving my Monster.  His Zed may of walked right past it and I got it on my Monster following on his tail :biggrin:

The VLF's seem to come to their own on this type of gold and see it no problems, it's just a shame they're hard to operate in the Australian ground.  I really like VLF detectors but a lot of guys in that forum thread are really hating on them, I assume as they're hard to operate in the ground there, however a guy on there Tim was making a lot of sense about VLF's in Australia and he manages to operate them well in the soil there. In the right soil types they are fantastic machines and can find things you'd only expect to get with a shovel and pan.

Confirms what everyone in the know has been saying, you really need both. a PI and a VLF or even a Zed and a VLF.  For a long time I was confused by even the best prospectors on this forum had a Zed, yet were out using their cheap little VLF's quite often not even taking their Zed with them.  Sure they came home with gold on the VLF but I was always wondering why they just didn't run their Zed and leave the VLF in the cupboard gathering dust.  It's all making sense now.

 

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1 hour ago, phrunt said:

Confirms what everyone in the know has been saying, you really need both. a PI and a VLF or even a Zed and a VLF.  For a long time I was confused by even the best prospectors on this forum had a Zed, yet were out using their cheap little VLF's quite often not even taking their Zed with them.  Sure they came home with gold on the VLF but I was always wondering why they just didn't run their Zed and leave the VLF in the cupboard gathering dust.  It's all making sense now.

 

Ever try to run a ZED with even a 14 inch coil in a mine dump area?   You will be there for the rest of your life.   Tight spaces and mine dumps are not the ZED's cup of tea.  There are better detectors for this, for sure.  That is where my VLF shines.  So as Steve has said before, there is no best detector for everywhere. :biggrin:

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  • Similar Content

    • By Steve Herschbach
      Legendary metal detector engineer George Payne laid the foundations for much of what we consider to be modern metal detector technology. He or companies he worked for hold a host of basic patents.
      I tripped over this old lawsuit between White's Electronics and the old Teknetics company (acquired by First Texas in later years) over George's invention of basic target discrimination / target id technology. The following is from the public record of the legal findings at https://law.justia.com/cases/oregon/court-of-appeals/1984/677-p-2d-68.html:
      I thought it provided an interesting peek at some early industry history and so here you go.....
       
      Decided February 22, 1984.
      *69 J. Pierre Kolisch, Portland, argued the cause for appellant. With him on the briefs were Jon M. Dickinson, Francine H. Gray and Kolisch, Hartwell & Dickinson, Portland.
      Edward T. Monks, Eugene, argued the cause for respondents. With him on the brief were Kenneth A. Morrow, Morrow, McCrea & Divita, Eugene, and Gary S. Kindness, Seattle, Wash., of counsel.
      Before GILLETTE, P.J., and WARDEN and YOUNG, JJ.
      GILLETTE, Presiding Judge.
      Plaintiff White's Electronics, Inc. (White's) commenced this action seeking the imposition of a constructive trust for its benefit in all rights, patentable or otherwise relating to an invention developed by defendant George Payne. White's also sought an injunction restraining defendants from selling any product embodying such an invention and from using any trade secrets or other proprietary information belonging to plaintiff. The trial court denied White's any relief. We affirm.
      White's is a manufacturer of metal detectors. In 1969, White's hired Payne, an electrical engineer, to invent new metal detector technology. In 1971, Payne signed *70 an employment agreement with White's that stated that he would assign to White's any invention that he developed during and for six months after termination of his employment that related to White's activities or was the result of tasks assigned by it. During this period of employment, Payne assigned to White's two patents covering inventions pertaining to metal detectors. In mid-1976, he terminated his employment and went to work for Bounty Hunters, one of White's competitors. He remained there until late 1978, when he sought reemployment with White's. Because of a noncompetition agreement with Bounty Hunters, he did not become reemployed by White's until January, 1980. He did, however, work as a consultant for White's during the intervening period. When Payne was rehired, he did not sign a new employment agreement. As during his previous employment, he worked to develop innovations in the metal detector field and to solve problems related to White's product line. He assigned one patent to White's during this employment period.
      The evidence concerning the events of January, 1981, is both conflicting and confusing. Payne testified that on January 9, 1981, he conceived an idea that would enable a metal detector automatically to provide the user with target identifying information, unlike any detector then on the market. He stated that he told defendant Morris, White's marketing manager, of his idea, but that he did not work any further on its development until January 15, when he assembled a breadboard a board containing electrical circuits to test his idea. The breadboard failed to achieve the desired result.
      On January 17, 1981, following a period of internal management disruption at White's, Payne and Morris both quit. Payne testified that, on January 19, 1981, while working to develop his idea of January 9, he "found something that is going to make this thing work, or allow me to continue development of it." He stated that, following this "breakthrough," he still had to work for many more months before his concept was perfected.
      On January 28, 1981, Payne and Morris, along with defendant Smith, organized defendant Teknetics, Inc., to market metal detectors in direct competition with White's. In December, 1981, Teknetics introduced a metal detector which incorporated Payne's target-identification concept.
      Plaintiff contends that Payne's "breakthrough" on January 19, actually occurred earlier while he was still employed by White's. In support of this contention, plaintiff introduced Payne's engineering notes containing circuitry designs dated January 18, 1981. Payne admitted that the date on those notes was in error and that they were probably prepared sometime before the 18th. Plaintiff's expert, an electronics engineer, testified that he or someone similarly skilled could build a target-identification circuit based on the information provided in the drawing. Payne testified to the contrary, stating that the key element to his target-identification concept did not appear in his notes until January 19, after he had left White's employ.
      The trial court found that Payne conceived his target-identification concept on January 9, but that he did not exert time and effort to develop it until after January 17, the date he left White's employ. According to the court:
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