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Why Are These Pulse Induction Devices So Expensive, The Price Of A Popular Car?


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I was doing a search between or VLF detectors prices are much cheaper. Now when it comes to the device PULSE INDUCTION GPZ 7000 or ULTRA-PULSE AXIOM GARRETT.

These PULSE INDUCTION devices they do more object discrimination, they penetrate deeper into mineralized ground or they are quieter than VLF detectors.

Is it still worth buying a professional PULSE INDUCTION device in 2023?

Why don't they manufacture a device like Makro GOLD KRUZER, Fisher Gold Bug Pro, GOLD MONSTER 1000 with PULSE INDUCTION.

I'm using Google translator, maybe some word has some error.

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VLf costs less and has better discrimination, but can't even come close to top PI performance in very bad ground. That's why nearly all the top gold prospectors use PI detectors. It's not because they like spending lots of money. :smile:

  • How Metal Detectors Work by Mark Rowan & William Lahr - Originally published by White's Electronics as a booklet P/N 621-0395. Basic but rather technical information on how induction balance and pulse induction metal detectors work.
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I have always wondered why PI units are so much more expensive.  Is there something in the hardware or just the Market?

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1 hour ago, JCR said:

I have always wondered why PI units are so much more expensive.  Is there something in the hardware or just the Market?

I can only say they actually work much better in highly mineralized ground so many times. Yes they are better, and yes, it’s the hardware. It cost over $10 million dollars to develop the GPZ 7000. If anything allows for higher prices it is probably the fact that just one company has dominated this area for so long, and so can to a large degree dictate the prices they want. But these machines are not cheap to develop, and those costs must be recouped, and fair shareholder value delivered. As time passes and the tech becomes available from other manufacturers the prices will come down, That has already started. But proven top tier performance will continue to demand top dollar. The GPZ 8000 will not be a cheap date.

It’s not even close. We are talking twice the depth or more. VLFs excel at finding small surface gold, but for larger gold at depth there is no comparison at all. Frankly, I’m surprised this is even a question. The evidence is obvious by examining what detectors have been making the bulk of the gold finds for over 20 years now.

You can’t just wave a magic wand and “add PI to VLF.” That displays a lack of knowledge of the technologies involved and is why I attached a link to a document above, so that people might educate themselves on the differences. You can find many more free books and articles at these links:

https://www.detectorprospector.com/magazine/steves-guides/metal-detecting-and-prospecting-library/

https://www.detectorprospector.com/magazine/steves-guides/steves-guides/

 

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In mineralized ground the PI's romp all over the VLF's. Saltwater beaches not so much, you might gain 2-4" over a VLF (Deus 2/Manticore) depending on the salt strength. But if you have both salt and minerals then yes PI all the way. I'll give you a few examples. In Culpeper VA where Civil War relics are dug. You can take any VLF including the Tarsacci and you might get 8" with an ID that would tell you it's ferrous or non-ferrous. With a GPX it's common to dig bullets and coat buttons in the 14-16" range and be fairly confident it's a bullet/button. Belt Plates have been dug at depths over 24". Now it does take some experience to be able to tell iron from bullets/buttons. But a VLF will not even hear a 14-16" bullet/button.

Gold nugget hunting is generally done in moderate to highly mineralized ground. VLF's are basically good for surface to a few inches deep on small nuggets and a little deeper on the bigger ones. I've seen in multiple instances where a VLF has called a small gold nugget iron at just a few inches deep or not see it at all. PI's are at least twice as deep on gold than a VLF in mineralized ground.

I have used both VLF and PI machines at saltwater beaches for almost a decade now. I've seen the development of VLF's get to the point that it's almost not worth using a PI at a beach anymore unless there's a lot of black sand in the area. You can see many videos on YouTube that show the slight margins a PI will get over a VLF on a low mineral saltwater beach, it's usually a few inches at best. VLF's have gotten better at handling salt so the margins are slim on ring sized targets. The exception may be the Fisher AQ but it never made it to production, so IMO it's not even in the running.

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Great response Andy, spot on!

The whole saltwater beach debate gets kind of silly at times. It's actually simple and my mantra in general. "Use a VLF when you can, and a PI when you have to." You will know when you have to, and until then, will question why people use them. VLF is the way to go until they do not produce any longer. We saw this first on the gold fields, and now with the relic areas. Once VLF has cleaned out what it can find, it's either go PI, or go home.

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Thanks for the replies.   I understand the difference in performance & application. I was just curious as to the large difference in selling price.  Are they more expensive to manufacture or is it just that they command a higher price because of the performance/application? Seemingly it is more market forces than production costs.  Steve , you mentioned the hardware was part of it, can you elaborate? I would like to know a little better for general knowledge.  It will be interesting to see what Nokta introduces and at what price point.

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Not all PI machines are expensive. Here in the UK, we have the C-Scope CS4PI:

https://regton.com/c-scope-cs4pi-metal-detector.html


But clearly it's not a nugget-hunter, they are mostly used on the beach ( though that is their target market , they are not waterproof, just the coil )

And of course some pinpoint probes are PI, and they don't cost 'car price' .

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