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Ridge Runner

Bundle The Notch Not A Good Thing

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If what we see of the face of the Vanquish is true with eighteen notch points then it’s bundled.

 This happens in lower end detectors but not totally true being it came in higher cost detector too  My Sport  wasn’t cheap but it too has the problem of having notch bundle .

 I have the ORX and to cut out anything I start at the bottom and work my way up . Like others I can’t pick what I want delete what I don’t want.

 The only one that we all know that will let you notch out what you don’t want and leave the others is the Nox .

 This is the main reason I don’t like my Sport is because of that. Don’t get me wrong I’d like it to run in more than one frequency but I knew that ahead of my purchase.

  I guess you couldn’t make me happy if you would hang me with a new rope. 

Just thinking out loud again! So why don’t you do the same here.

 Chuck 

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I had trouble following Ridge Runner.

They are all buckets.  Whites' V3/V3i has 190 notch buckets (95 ferrous and 95 non-ferrous).   Minelab's Etrac has 1750 notch buckets (35 ferrous x 50 conductive). Fisher F75 has 10 notch buckets (2 for Ferrous, 2 for foil, 2 for nickel, 2 for tabs and 2 for zinc).  The Equinox has 50 notch buckets.  AT Pro has 12 notch buckets containing 5 numbers each.....I dunno...I could go on.  Notching is pretty common.

It sounds like the ORX doesn't notch?

HH
Mike

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So the Vanquish doesn't use anti gravity alien technology as depicted in the video ?

I'm less worried about notching, I find I risk losing more than just cutting out trash. It is however handy if you don't have good audio or tone roll. Granted finer notching gets you closer to the edge of good and bad targets but I think there are just too many variables that kick a particular target beyond the typical fringes.

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Hi Mike

 I didn’t say a word about any detector that has unlimited notching. I just was referring to detectors that bundle up are out more that one number at a time..

Kac

 In your first sentence was a disappointment to find out that the Vanquish will be sold without anti gravity.

 Guys what you buy has to make you and only you happy. That’s the same with me!

 Thanks for posting your reply! 

Chuck 

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I'm not a fan of notching other than in groups anyway, in fact it drives me mad as you get broken signals of half notched out targets.  It would take some severe trash for me to bother notching.  It's nice to have, but not nice to often use, I'd rather hear all the targets except obvious iron 😉

The Equinox notching is a nice feature but not something I use much.  I'm happy enough with the T2's method of a range that you block out... that seems to work well for me.

Good targets often seem to get a solid ID, bad targets often get a big range of random numbers... makes notching them out hard and as we all know the bad targets that get a good ID like pull tabs are super risky to notch out, I prefer to let my brain make the decision on what to dig than the detector.

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Phrunt  

 Thanks for your opinion on my post. I place the post just to get different opinions like yours.

 I don’t care if it’s weight, frequencies and like my post on notching everyone has their own opinion.

 Opinion don’t make me wrong and you right are the other way around. It just shows like different detectors people are different in what they like are dislike in a detector.

 I’m sure it’s others out there that has their opinion of this subject so step up and express it.

 Chuck 

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On 9/5/2019 at 10:46 AM, Ridge Runner said:

I have the ORX and to cut out anything I start at the bottom and work my way up . Like others I can’t pick what I want delete what I don’t want.

That isn't notching, that is increasing discrimination and if you do that much past the iron range (15 or so) you are going to affect overall recovery depth for ALL targets.  The ORX is missing the adjustable notch feature of the Deus.  You can set up to 3 separate notch segments or individual notch points.  On Deus they are tone ID audible filters so if you choose to use them they have no effect on depth like the Deus/Orx discrimination filter.

As far as notch bundle segments vs. individual points, the answer for me is "it depends".  I rarely notch in the first place, I don't ponder it much.  So thinking about it,  if you have a machine that can notch out both individual ID's AND larger bundle segnents then you have max flexibility/adjustability, so that is good thing.  However, I would tend to notch a bundled segment more likely than individual ID's for the reasons phrunt mentioned above and the simple fact that the junk targets you would likely want to notch usually have variable IDs like pull tabs or the high ID iron wraparound region.  Bottom line, I wouldn't say "bundled notch not a good thing" as in you thread title,  as there are many situations were it serves its purpose just fine.  I would simply say that if you have limited notch adjustability, it is not "ideal" or "optimal", but I certainly would not put a high  value on that feature.  So implementation of adjustable or bundled notch is really not a key make or break factor if I am pondering a detector purchase.  JMO

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Hi Chase

 This is what the Dictionary says

A-V-shaped indentation  /I know I didn’t take my knife out and make a mark on my detector.

B- a split made to serve as a record/ I myself like to split off one number at a time. Now you can call it notching are discrimination but when it comes down to it it’s the same thing but said and used differently.

 I like to block out one number at a time . Some detector companies like to group block and some people like that . I guess you could say I march to a different drum beat . We just don’t go down the same path .

 It’s all about what makes you and myself happy and that’s where we spend our money.

 Chuck 

 

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2 hours ago, Ridge Runner said:

Hi Chase

 This is what the Dictionary says

A-V-shaped indentation  /I know I didn’t take my knife out and make a mark on my detector.

B- a split made to serve as a record/ I myself like to split off one number at a time. Now you can call it notching are discrimination but when it comes down to it it’s the same thing but said and used differently.

 I like to block out one number at a time . Some detector companies like to group block and some people like that . I guess you could say I march to a different drum beat . We just don’t go down the same path .

 It’s all about what makes you and myself happy and that’s where we spend our money.

 Chuck 

 

Hi Chuck!

First of all, let's get our definitions straight - the proper term is "notch filter".  Here is the definition:

A Notch Filter is also known as a Band Stop filter or Band Reject Filter. These filters reject/attenuate signals in a specific frequency band called the stop band frequency range and pass the signals above and below this band. ... Stop Band Frequency: Any signal in this frequency range ...

The "frequency range" in the case of metal detecting can be translated to mean "target ID range".  The key here is the statement "pass [or conversely block] the signals above and below this band"

There is no mention of "notch filter" or "notch" in the ORX manual, only Discrimination.  XP differentiates between Notch and Discrimination on the ORX's cousin, the Deus as follows using a quote from Andy Sabisch's XP Handbook:  "The easiest way to describe the NOTCH function is an adjustable "window" which can selectively BLOCK THE AUDIO from specific targets.  Unlike the DISCRIMINATION function which always starts rejecting targets at [0] and continues doing so up through the point selected by the user, the single NOTCH function allows the starting point to be defined by the user....The advantage of using the NOTCH function over the DISCRIMINATION function is that detection depth will not be impacted when NOTCH is applied."   Unfortunately, ORX has no NOTCH, bundled or otherwise, just Discrimination.  That was all I was trying to say, so it was immaterial to the discussion at the root of the title of your thread since ORX has no notch.

This doesn't apply to other detectors such as your Sport and other detectors such as the Equinox in which Notch and Discrimination can be often (but not always) be used interchangeably.

Whether or not you like to "notch" single digits, yeah that is a personal preference, but notching and discrimination at least as they relate to XP Deus and ORX are two different animals and are not different path choices.  Just saying.

 

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Hi Chase  

  It’s all about what you like and what I do also . We can go back and forth all day but it still comes down that we want the best that money can buy . I guess I should have said more for less .

 I see you wanted to dig deeper on this subject matter than I.

 It’s like when my wife ask me about something and I tell her that I don’t know. Her reply back is that they didn’t call you again.

 Here I am again in they didn’t call me on the Vanquish are the Simplex.

 If the powers that be want to do so here is my number ( BR 5-5555 )

 Chuck 

PS Chase I never want someone to totally agree with me! If that was the case we would never learn something new . That’s what this forum is all about and that’s learning more each day from others like you.  Oh no not me . I belong to over the hill gang.

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