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I see Jamflicker on Friendly forum just hit 2000 silver coins in about 10  years hunting which is amazing. I bet our member Raphis  here on this forum is in that  range too.10 years and 2000 silver = vacuum cleaner.I am talking about wild coins and not organized hunts.I am in that  club because  I found over 500 silver in a spilled cache which helped me get  there more easily.To tell the truth  I don't know what my exact totals are.I would have to go through my records since 1999. How many here are in that club?If not what  total are you at and how many years.

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I see Jamflicker on Friendly forum just hit 2000 silver coins in about 10  years hunting which is amazing. I bet our member Raphis  here on this forum is in that  range too.10 years and 2000 silver =

I've been at it since I was in 8th grade, which was about 1976.   I wish I'd kept track of all the silver coins I'd found, so I could chime in on your question 🤪 I would not count caches (yes, ev

This was a barn (long story about why anyone would have been detecting there, TO BEGIN WITH, so I'll have to leave out that part of the story).   But suffice it to say, the location of the barn had so

My cache was found with a  friend.It was  in best finds for 2007 in western and eastern   by curt roe titled  I think" Silver in the  rough".We invited clad hopper along for the ride too.I got more after the article too.

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I've been at it since I was in 8th grade, which was about 1976.   I wish I'd kept track of all the silver coins I'd found, so I could chime in on your question 🤪

I would not count caches (yes, even spilled ones) into the total.  If you're talking of singular fumble-finger-losses, then a cache or broke-open-cache is not in the same category.   Jamflicker & Dan ("Raphis") are finding them one-fumble-finger loss at a time.   I too, decades ago, got into  a location where jars of silver coins had apparently broken open by a farm plow.  And spread out into a field and barn area.   Such that sometimes you'd get 5 or 10 silver coins all fused together.   That's different than the 1-at-a-time that Dan and Jam do, as you know.

Also, there's different niches.   Ie.: While that might be the most merc's from turfed So. CA parks (or ANY USA parks in-a-given-year), yet there's other niches.   Like notice they find few, if any, seateds.   And there's guys that have no desire to knock themselves silly for  roosies and mercs in junky turf cherry-picking.  And might only end the year with 10 or 12 silver coins.  Yet every one of them will be a seated.   So as you can see :  Different niche categories of skill. 

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6 hours ago, Dances With Doves said:

My cache was found with a  friend.It was  in best finds for 2007 in western and eastern   by curt roe titled  I think" Silver in the  rough".We invited clad hopper along for the ride too.I got more after the article too.

Could you tell us more about that here on the forum?  I could go looking for that magazine but seems like a lot of work when the horse's mouth is right here in the flesh (well 'in the pen' anyway)!  :biggrin:

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4 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

Could you tell us more about that here on the forum?  I could go looking for that magazine but seems like a lot of work when the horse's mouth is right here in the flesh (well 'in the pen' anyway)!  :biggrin:

 There was a brown building at a beach by Lake ontario and a  bulldozer cut a path next to   it.I went off the path and started finding silver on the weeds on  top.We found about 5  different piles within 20 yards.The cut path was next to a pond and we went in and got even more.Mostly mercs and  Rosies and no key dates.The coins dated to 1963.  

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I just talked to clad hopper and his total with the cache is 2317.His    tally from the  cache is about 350 which puts him just under 2000 for non cache coins.He told me he is at 994 for  indians also. We both started hunting in the summer of 1999.    

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3 minutes ago, Dances With Doves said:

There was a brown building at a beach by Lake ontario....

Did you ever come up with a hypothesis on why those coins were cached there?  Did the building predate the beach (I'm assuming public beach...) or was it some kind of concession stand or ??

In Charles Garrett's book on cache hunting he says that the best way to succeed is to find a potential site first through research, but that (of course) stumbling upon them does happen.  Sounds like you did the latter, but that's nothing to feel bad about.  😉  Some of my best finds (singles, not caches) came about without me having a clue they might be there.

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1 minute ago, GB_Amateur said:

Did you ever come up with a hypothesis on why those coins were cached there?  Did the building predate the beach (I'm assuming public beach...) or was it some kind of concession stand or ??

In Charles Garrett's book on cache hunting he says that the best way to succeed is to find a potential site first through research, but that (of course) stumbling upon them does happen.  Sounds like you did the latter, but that's nothing to feel bad about.  😉  Some of my best finds (singles, not caches) came about without me having a clue they might be there.

it could have been an old beach  house .It is abandoned now.

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To answer Tom.Even  without  the cache i would be over 1000 for sure.The cache was just icing on the cake.  I also like finding the older(pre   Barber)silver coins but they are tough. I hunted 2.5 years with the Nox and not even 1 ,but   I have found 4 Large cents and 1 was  near a sandbox like Tom always says. I like his   sense of humor.When you go out metal  detecting just have fun because that's what it's all about. I will count my total Tom's  way for he is right that getting those coins the way he described is the way they should be counted. I will  have cache total plus non cache total and for fun combine the 2 since I liked finding  that big  pile of  coins.

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