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Getting The Best From The SDC2300


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Hi all,

 

Hope everyone had a great Christmas.

 

It's been some time since I put up a new blog on my website, but I've recently posted one discussing how to get the best performance from the SDC2300.

 


 

If you pick up 1 new tip, then it'll be worth the read.

 

Cheers,

 

Nenad

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Thank you very much.

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Thanks, Nenad! Your videos and tips have been very helpful to get the best from the SDC. I love mine.

At times, I will do a second noise cancel shortly after the first as it seems to put the machine in to the zone even more or, maybe, my ears just needed  to warm up a bit and it seems to sound better. Having used the machine for a while now I know how smoothly it is capable of running... it has a certain "tone" to the treshold when dialed in. At times, a second noise cancel seems to get it there.

 

 

Dean

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Nenad, great blog.  

 

Occasionally, my 2300 will just go crazy with a cycling type of noise.  I have been assuming it is caused by EMI.  I just turn it off and back on and the chatter is gone.  Could it be EMI or some sort of defect?   When it happens would it be better to just do a noise cancel?

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Yeah I'd say it's probably just EMI - it is in the air flying past your coil and is always changing. That is why you still hear it without needing to move the coil. My SDC loves planes, as soon as my threshold starts to wobble I know a plane is going past. I just flick the headphones to bypass, have a drink and when the threshold settles I start detecting again. If it's a persistent interference then yes do a Noise Cancel again. 

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Just read a little trouble shooting hint by Jim Foster in the Au magazine Gold Gem And Treasure .

It may be that your machine is cycling because of loose battery's in the upper compartment. He says the battery with the positive nipple pointing to the rear momentarily disconnects from the spring if and when you hit an object to hard resulting in shut down and a reboot or perhaps in your case Hawkeye a split second hiccup in processing . Jim recommends shimming the upper compartment with a round of cardboard to take up the slack, hope this helps and happy hunting and success to all in the New Year from down under .

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Hawkeye, just something I forgot to mention Jim says the compartment size is due to different battery sizes, it would pay to check the diameter of your battery's first as they do varie from country and suppliers. I would hate to have you shim yours only to find you can not get them back out to recharge, disaster, anyway have a good'n . Chris.

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+1 on the tip about putting a paper shim (don't jam it in or they will get stuck) just around the top battery compartment from the Gold Gem And Treasure article. It's a much better idea than taping all the batteries or stretching the springs. I measured the thickness of the supplied rechargables against normal disposable batteries and they are exactly the same so it's no fault of the supplied batteries (except the positive "bump" is a bit small on the rechargables). Love your article too Nenad. I've just bought a 2300 and have only had it out once but it was very noisy. The day was very hot (37 degrees) and windy so hoping that was the only reason. I had also put tape on the top of the coil to try and reduce scratches. I've now removed it to see if it could have been causing a bit of noise. I'll try your tips on the next trip to see if I can get it to run a bit quieter.

 

Do any of the salt settings offer any better stability compared to sensitivity 1 on bad emi days?

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I have had this cycling happen on my 2300 also,the batteries were fresh charged and after an hour it started cycling many times in the next hour. I noticed it would happen after a left swing that hit brush or hit rocks,i was sure the coil was bad or worse, i sat down and looked at everything and nothing apparent stood out as to why it was cycling. I decided to put another load of my spare batteries in it and it went back to normal,definitely something to do with connections or possible bad battery is what im thinking.

Question, you guys that are using rrechargeable batteries what tests do you put them through to determine if batts.are getting weaker? I do simple voltage checks on them periodically but can you do a load test say like i would check a truck battery to see if battery will actually hold proper voltage or not.

Thanks. RICK

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