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MikePfeiffer

What Is Your Pick For Best Detector Or Manufacturer?

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I am writing this in hopes that some metal detector manufacturers will read this and see what is wanted by the people in the field.

What manufacturer to you think is on the leading edge? (why)

What manufacture do you think needs a wake up call?

What is your favorite all purpose detector? (coin, jewelry, and relic)

What is your favorite prospecting detector?

What do you wish the manufacturers would incorporate in new machines?

I am not going to answer the question as I do not feel my knowledge base is at the level of the people on this forum. I still use a 30 year old detector. Everything I have read shows that this forum has the highest knowledge base of ones I have seen. Add any additional question that you think may be of interest.

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 Egads MP! This forum has some of the best detectorists on this planet and a fella that somehow keeps it on track and organized so a perusal of the well organized archives would answer all of those questions. Be warned- you will find strong opinions all over the map on any one topic but the ones that are the most important are mine.

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My pick  is the Hermit pick-medium and large...just teasing...

My detector choices are currently ctx and gpz-none better that I have used.

And I always bow to the mighty Klunkers opinion.

fred

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The best nugget detector is the one I don't have. The best coin detector is the one I have in my hand when I find my first gold coin.

On a relic detector, one relic don't hunt another relic.

The best of any is the one you can afford at that time in your life.

Chuck

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Yeah, I thought the thread was about digging picks so added a little to the title.

I am content with what the manufacturers are up to in general. I don't have a favorite company, to me it is the industry as a whole. Competition is heating up - that's good. We all have different ideas about how we would run their businesses if we were them but we sometimes forget that what we want is not always what makes them money. They are after all in business. Between all of them they are moving the ball forward, just each in their own way.

I just want more emphasis on ergonomics.

My favorite prospecting detector? That's easy, GPZ 7000.

Favorite all purpose? I am still struggling with that one.

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I don't have a single favorite detector.

There are some I've had though were let's just say,,didn't live up to my standards for money spent.

I do feel there are some best practices going on right now,,and all manufacturers should be taking notes.

You know what they say,,,if you can't beat em join em.

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The price of detectors should be a little more realistic.When you take them apart to put batteries in some of them the circuitry looks very simple compared to lets say a flat screen TV or a marine chartplotter / depthfinder GPS unit or the computer that you're looking at now.They're metal detectors.... that's all...they're simple and should be priced accordingly.One more thing,since they're a device that is used outdoors 99% of the time make them waterproof...or at least rainproof.

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I can buy a "new" Bz booster , Minelab pinpointer  or a( Headphone Adapter plug 5" lead) for the Minelab sdc-2300 for the same $165bux  hows that make sense?

Selling the detector....see classifieds:rolleyes:

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Not a easy question answer really,as it was not just gold nugget detectors i guess more of a general what do you use.

These are my 3 main ones although i do have many more site specific use ones.

1)Everyday use detector Deus with 9'' coil,also carry a complete back up machine just incase anything goes wrong with my prime machine.

2)Nexus MP with 3 coils 13'',10'' and 7'' coil,this machine excels in very highly mineralised ground conditions and can also work very well on wetsalt beaches,but its the total crazy depth of this machine that i mainly use it for deep relic and hunting gold related hoards.

3)TDI Pro was my main depth machine,but these days has been relegated too hunting for gold jewellery etc on beaches,also with a small coil on is great for micro jewellery.

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Mmm, manufacturers that are on the leading edge - I'd have to say XP, as many manufacturers are trying emulate the success of the Deus, with some still trying to play catch up, and with varied rates of success.  The other would have to be Minelab with its patented technologies, there's no getting around the fact that they have cornered the gold detecting market with innovative tech and well engineered detectors.

As a whole, I think many of the manufacturers are starting to wake up to what the consumer wants or expects from a detector, vs what the manufacturer thinks is right for the consumer.  This is reflected in by allowing testing and developmental input by the detecting community vs being soley done by in-house testers.  Take Nokta/Makro as a prime example.

My main detector for coin/relic detecting is of course the Deus, chosen to replace the Explorer SE Pro and Etrac due to both the ability, weight and excellent ergonomics, and being somewhat future proofed.  My backups are the Makro Racer 2, Teknetics G2 and the F75 - jury is still out on the F75 at this stage.

I rarely prospect, hence have a Garrett Infinium and White SPP gathering dust in my shed.  The Infinium gets an odd run at the beach until I get sick of digging bobby pins and tent pegs. :biggrin:

What should manufacturers incorporate into their detectors?  Usual stuff - lack of weight, miniaturisation of the electronics, improved ergonomics, full wireless capability, ditch alkaline batteries and go Lithium polymer, and make detectors fully updatable by the end user. Generally speaking, make good use of current available technology on offer.

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