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Steve Herschbach

What Constitutes A New Prospecting Detector?

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klunker    1,232
1 hour ago, Steve Herschbach said:

No. In my opinion that would be unlikely. I certainly could be wrong. It does not matter that much to me; all that matters is real world performance on found targets.

 How about real world performance on finding targets?

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DDancer    249

One in the same klunker the way I read it.  To find is to be found however finding is what the operator does and to be found is what the detector does.  Sorry just thinking on the topic and I get a simile in my head.

How does one re-invent the wheel?  What defines a truely new type of prospecting detector?  The answer for me is that there is no real way to do so.  All that can be done is tweek the basic design and look at the results.  VLF, PI or ZVT and any combination of these are all just tweeks on the basic design.  One can talk about accessories all day long but in the end the base unit is just the tweek of the base design.

A thought would be to make a machine with true imaging and composition read out but then would that be a new metal detector?  I'm just playing with thoughts however.

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Steve Herschbach    7,948

For me to compare detectors I have to do more than go finding stuff. I have to compare both machines on "found targets".

If I am doing serious testing there is only one way I do it. For two detectors:

1. Take detector number one, go find a target. Play with settings to get best signal on this found target. This insures you are tuned up properly for this ground.

2. Check same target with second detector. Again adjust settings for best results in this ground.

3. Make notes on responses, dig the target, make notes on what it was, settings, depth, etc.

4. Swap detectors, and go find target with the second detector.

5. Cross check with first detector.

6. Continue swapping the two detectors and repeating this process for as long and as many targets as it takes to reach reasonable conclusions.

7. Always realize results are only valid for the particular ground and on the particular types of targets found. A totally different location with different mineralization and types of target (gold for instance varies greatly in different places) may yield different results.

This process can take many hours if not days, and can't be rushed. The only thing we want detectors to do is find targets in the ground that usually have been buried a long time. Air tests, test gardens, buried targets etc. all provide some information but in my opinion never substitute for extensive cross testing on "found targets".

My experience with modern VLF detectors is it is very hard to find genuine targets where one detector really shines compared to the other. With most targets both units will fare just as well. I therefore pay particular attention to fringe and "iffy" targets trying to get a situation where one detector has a clear edge over the other. Most machines are so good now it takes a lot of hours to find the edge, one over the other, if it exists at all. More often I just decide I like one or the other more for other reasons doing more with ergonomics than anything else.

I am actually in the process of doing this now using four detectors.

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klunker    1,232

Four detectors?! It takes me months to learn just one detector. One of my dig and detect projects would be an excellent place to do your testing.

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whitebutler    226

What constitutes a new prospecting detector???

BECAUSE I WANT ONE!

John

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DDancer    249

Look. Really just look.  Steve put up a very comprehensive set of tests for what to look for... honestly take the yin and the yang and look at it.  No such machine exists.  Not yet.  The ZVT is the closest "new" tech yet however it does not address all complaints.  Will not in my opinion but it does a darn good job in many facets. I love it, ZVT, and spoke for it prior to its release. ZVT is one of the most potent releases in detecting times in my opinion.  All are variations on the wheel but I do not diss any variants just pulse that the basics are already there... just that some one, some where, some when will make the click that moves the basics to the next level.... personally I dread that... any swinging *d* can then move up the bar.... and really.  Everyone thinks they have Gold buried in their back yards. Funny how few try to find it.

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whitebutler    226

What he said!

 

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    • By Steve Herschbach
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      You can find more information on harmonic frequencies at http://www.ni.com/white-paper/3359/en/ and here also.
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      1994 Compass X-200                6 kHz    14 khz
      1997 Minelab XT 18000            6.4 kHz    20 kHz    60 kHz
      1999 Minelab Golden Hawk        6.4 kHz    20 kHz    60 kHz
      2002 Minelab Eureka Gold        6.4 kHz    20 kHz    60 kHz
      2005 Minelab X-TERRA 50                7.5 kHz    18.75 kHz
      2006 Minelab X-TERRA 70            3 kHz    7.5 kHz    18.75 kHz
      2009 Minelab X-TERRA 305            7.5 kHz    18.75 kHz
      2009 Minelab X-TERRA 505        3 kHz    7.5 kHz    18.75 kHz
      2009 Minelab X-TERRA 705        3 kHz    7.5 kHz    18.75 kHz
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      2016 Rutus Alter 71        Variable 4 - 18 kHz
      2017 Nokta Impact            5 kHz    14 kHz    20 kHz
       
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      2001 White's Beach Hunter ID   3 & 15 kHz (DFX in waterproof housing)
       
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    • By Steve Herschbach
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    • By Rajat
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    • By Steve Herschbach
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    • By MikePfeiffer
       
      Steve, your a great source for unbiased information. I trust your opinion greatly.  Don't fret over what just happened. Many many people view you as a great resource.
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    • By mn90403
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