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mn90403

Arizona Gold With Outing Pictures Link!

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Great story and pictures.  I love seeing cactus in the desert.  In Northern Nevada, cactus is rare and a nice sight to see, although its typically less than a foot tall. 

If there is a road, Chet will get you there.   We have not encountered a road yet, that we had to turn around.

See ya in the gold fields.

Brian.

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Mitchell, thanks for sharing such nice pictures. It looks like you found the "pointy finger" nugget. Also, for the uninitiated, the short, stumpy, whitish cactus is known as the Jumping Cholla (choy yah), so-named because some people believe that it jumps at you when you walk by, embedding spine tufts into you. Actually, this is a misconception, the cholla actually flings the spine tufts at you, sometimes firing several in rapid succession. It is an endangered species, due to the fact that it fires more spine tufts than it replaces, and, also due to the fact that it is the favorite food of the Mojave Desert Greater Sidehill Gouger, whose numbers have skyrocketed due to the moratorium on hunting them. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it. 😊

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Great pictures and story Mitchell thanks for posting as we don't see stuff like that over here, we have desert for sure were we go detecting but it's not like that, off course we don't have bears and lions either.

cheers dave

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I didn't know if I was going to find any gold but I knew I could bring back some pictures.  haha

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Thanks for the link and the pics, Mitchel.  Glad to see you didn't have to deal with Pepe' Le Pew.

22 hours ago, mn90403 said:

I took a couple of bad picture of the nugget this morning with the phone.  It makes me want to get a better one ... nugget and phone that is!

While you're at it, get a better dime, too.

Regarding the video, I have a couple questions (for anyone here):  1) What detector was Mike Slater using?  Sounded to me like an IB/VLF but looked kinda like a Minelab PI.  2) Why the firearm in the Wickenburg area?   I've (nugget) hunted three GPAA claims there and plan to go back.  Don't remember seeing / hearing of animals that would require that kind of response.  Maybe I should reconsider?

 

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Hey Mitchell,

   I'm sure you are well aware that general area they are hunting produced some good nuggets back in the day.  I seen some ounce plus nuggets come from that area, if not in that area.  

GB_Amateur - I think Mike is using one of those Notka FORS Gold's, I believe that is the name.  I added a picture of one below.  I think the gun is for general protection.  I think most prospectors agree, it's better to have a firearm and never use it, let alone get in some situation with a crazy person or some type of animal and not have one! 

Hope this helps,

ROb

FORS.jpg

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Rob,

Actually I didn't know much about the area.  As far as I remember, that is the first nugget I've ever found at LSD or SD or Stanton for that matter.  It was my first time to drive up that far.  You guys have not shared your secrets with me.  haha

My best find until that nugget was a pocket watch case (without the watch) that was found more north and east of Jackass Flats than this area.  

Mitchel

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Nice pics thanks for sharing!lots of gear involved!

 

 

RR

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Good post and great photos,

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