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Aqua Manta Pulse Induction Beach Detector

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Anyone out there know any information on this machine ? It supposed to be being tested and could be really interesting when released .

May be able to discriminate Iron out .

You Tube this .  AQUAMANTA A1 TESTS HARDELOT . All in capitals . 

It is compared to the Sovereign and CTX , the Aqua is the last one tested . Unfortunately LIKE the Equinox most of the time before release , its in a foreign language .

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Nuke em - you get 2 demerits for failing to check the forum daily! Lol

Steve started a thread about this in April

Since then info has emerged about the status of the Project at Fisher - coming along nicely apparently.

 

 

 

 

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And i thought i would get in first LOL

I will be watching this one .

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There is a lot of information coming out posted by LE JAG - his name is Denis and he has been the field tester for the Manta project for at least 3 years. He is a very experienced beach hunter and has used most of Eric Foster’s PI machines including the fabled Aquastar.  He is the guy with the detector in the full-on test (in French) of the Manta which Steve posted a link to.  I’ll stick it here for convenience.

https://youtu.be/G8sdp4RG73g

Why somebody who lives in the Sonoran Desert in Arizona should be so fired up about this machine is a good question to ask.  I just love the story of how Alexandre posted about the Manta in 2016 on the Geotech forum which Carl Moreland (chief engineer at First Texas) runs.  Contact was made and Alexandre shipped a prototype to El Paso.  Result - First Texas bought the project lock, stock and barrel and put Alexandre’s team on the payroll.

Testing of pre-production Fisher PI’s are expected to start soon - how soon? I don’t know.

Availability depends on the results of testing of actual pre-production examples by experienced and respected beach hunters. That process will start sometime in the not-too-distant future (I do not know when). If things go well, production would follow and the new machine would be announced - complete with its “Fisher” name - and online content showing what it can do. Some of this online content will no doubt be produced by First Texas (Russ Balbirona, Director of Marketing at FT is an excellent producer of such things) - some will likely be produced by folks who have handled so-called “Marketing Test” examples and - as is intended - have shared their experiences. This is all completely normal in “detector world”.

Right now, First Texas are not the ones stirring up the you-know-what about this, it’s little old me. I am pleased on many levels by the promise this new machine holds and my travel trailer is ready to haul my skinny self off to California as soon as I get my hands on one - all those goodies - all that black sand.

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With the TDI “floater” properly launched, it’s maybe time to throw out a tidbit on the Manta. I had a BHID - with the 12” coil - boy that baby could float, coil and all.

I am now convinced that when the new Fisher PI appears it might be called most any thing - anything but “Manta”.  Fisher clearly wants it to be the start of a new PI line and will likely choose a name that suits them.

It is moving towards production - the whole “Euroteam” was in El Paso a couple of weeks ago for a “junta” (meeting in El Paso-ese).

I have been watching the French beach test dozens of times and I just got the OK to share this.  It’s the Beach test video for the manta with the addition of my English captions (upper left of the screen). It helps keep up with the action - assuming you don’t enderstand LE JAG’s French.  That is LE JAG - chief tester for the Manta project for the last several years - by the way, in the video.

It’s on my Dropbox account, set to share.  Just click on the link and it will stream, just like as if it was on YouTube.

If I can get organized to do it, I may edit the video down to short clip demos of various key points of the Manta’s operations - we’ll see.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/yjfb1ah42fyhvmt/10-10-2%20Manta%20Titles.mp4?dl=0

As the project progresses, there will no doubt be a whole series of demo and how-to videos produced - some in French and some in English. The market for this thing is world wide - Maybe multi lingual versions - pick your soundtrack - who knows.

LE JAG emailed me today - his weekend at the beach with the latest prototype netted 23 grams of 18K - the same tally as his last trip two weeks ago.  France next summer anybody?   Maybe I should get up a tour ?

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Clock is ticking on this one now for 2019 - but will it happen?

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I've been very interested in the Manta from the beginning.  Even though the first unit will be mainly for beach hunting I'd still enjoy comparing it to my TDI.  I don't beach hunt but once a year, but use my TDI in the coal waste areas where I live (was the actual reason for purchasing the unit).  The TDI has uncovered many masked targets that my other VLF machine couldn't detect.  Actually the largest, heaviest gold ring I've ever found, came from using the TDI in the same coal waste school yards. 

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