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Orange Roughie patch Post Script 2

On the day that the Roughie was dug up a car drove very slowly past on the nearby  road. We were aware that the secret was out, and it was obvious we were being watched. Shortly after, we arrived one morning to discover a number of fresh detector holes that we had not dug. We had been 'moonlighted'. Checking these holes we discovered that although some were very shallow, only penetrating the top soil, others were deeper, going down through soil, gravel, to the clay beneath. These would most likely have yielded gold. From the position of the holes it was obvious that someone had closely observed us and knew exactly what area we were successfully detecting.

 To put a stop to this I hired a caravan (trailer) that day, and parked it on a section already detected and overlooking the area we were currently working. I then camped there, setting my alarm clock to ring every few hours, whereupon I would take a flash light and check the area. This was not an ideal way to get a good nights sleep, but it did work, and we had no further problems with poachers. I suspected that the car that drove slowly past was the culprit, and two years later I believed that this was confirmed.

I had just recently teamed up with John and Ian on the Pulse Induction prototype project, and we had only been in Dunolly for a few days when I recognized the suspect car pulling up outside the Railway hotel where we had booked in for what turned out to be a years stay. I had met the two brothers that alighted, and knew them only slightly. They were a pair of notorious 'moonlighters' from Ballarat. "G'day fellas", I said, "long time no see", and I invited them in for a beer. Over a cold one, and after a bit of small talk, I asked, "look, it's all water under the bridge now, but just how much did you blokes pinch out of Carr's Paddock?" They looked at each other and laughed. "Aha", I said, "so it was you buggers". One said, "well you're half right", we did go down to Rokewood with the intention of doing a bit of night time detecting. We parked our car right up near the old tip (rubbish dump) and walked all the way down Frenchman's creek , but just as we got to the paddock, a car came up the road, and as it went around the bend its lights swung out into the field, there was a guy out there with a detector, so we decided to give the whole thing a miss. "You didn't happen to see what sort of car that bloke had did you"?, I asked. "Well yeah", was the reply, "we returned via the bridge, and his car was parked down there in the bushes".

From their description, I knew that car quite well.

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2 hours ago, Reg Wilson said:

Orange Roughie patch Post Script 2

From their description, I knew that car quite well.

Ah !  .......... The Plot thickens !

Cheers

Ashley 

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 Sorry Ashley, but I can't reveal the owner of that vehicle, but should they ever read this post, they will know that their nocturnal escapades did not remain a secret, and their Karma will catch up with them, although from what I have heard it probably already has.

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Post script 3.

After hearing the story from the Ballarat boys about their aborted poaching expedition, I bought another round of beers, and asked them, "I've only detected around Dunolly a couple of times, but you blokes know this area pretty well don't you? I'd hate to go home to the 'better half ' with nothing to show for my time here. Is there anywhere you can think of where I might pick up just a small color or two?" After a bit of thought, one of the boys suggested I try a spot at Patchy Flat, which was just off the Timor road. "When you get to the tree line turn right, and a few hundred meters along the track you will see where a claim has been worked on the left. There is a gap of about twenty meters between the worked ground and the fence marking the edge of the private property. We've picked up a few bits there, so if you go slow and poke around the bushes you might get something ". I thanked them for the information and they left.

That night I told John of our conversation, and we agreed that we would pay a visit to Patchy Flat the next day as he had picked up some information about some ground on the left side of the road. Ian was at home with the flu at the time. Taking two cars we separated at the tree line and went to our spots. I found the worked claim without difficulty, and taking out 'the unfair advantage', ( prototype PI ) set it up and ground balanced. The 'scrape and detect' claim had been worked and rehabilitated to the edge of the track, leaving the track and the unworked ground  between the track and the fence. I decided to grid out the track and then the ground out to the fence. I had only gone about ten meters or so when I got a nice broad hum on the left hand side of the track. Thinking it must be junk I started digging the rock hard compacted ground. When I got down about a foot I realized the ground was intact, and this signal was now unlikely to be rubbish. It was in fact a nice nine ounce slug. The next bit in the track was about five ounces, and by the time I had finished gridding it I was up over the twenty ounce mark with a lot of smaller colors. It was slow going as the track was like concrete, and it took me all day to finish it.

John had got a few colors where he had been working, so we phoned Ian and told him of the new spot. Next morning he turned up coughing and spluttering, but determined not to miss out on the fun. We went back to finish the ground between the track and the fence, where I managed to dig a twenty and a fourteen ounce bit plus a few smaller bits, while John and Ian brought the total patch weight up to about sixty ounces.

 They never knew it, but the Ballarat boys had more than made up for their sneaky intentions, and the 'unfair advantage' had struck again.

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A question to either Reg or jrbeatty if they care to answer.

I was wondering if there is a lot of difference between the prototypes you were using and what's available today? Now I know that today's detectors are better at finding the small stuff and probably handle hot ground better,  but do they actually go deeper? Let's say for argument's sake that you had 5 patches of gold-bearing ground that the prototype handled ok and you grided and worked those patches to death, did a later model detector find gold "AT DEPTH" that you missed with the prototypes? (Surely you would have revisited some of those patches with new release detectors.) Or did those prototypes do a pretty good job?  

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Jin, all I can say is that I have never dug deeper holes with anything since the prototypes.

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Thanks again Reg, always an interesting read.

Also, I have sent you a message - check the little envelope up in the R) hand corner.

Cheers. 

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So you missed a few big bits in there then Reg,  saw a 70 and a 90 oz come out of patchy Flat with production SD 2000's

In fact one of them, can't remember now if it was the 70 or 90 featured on the front cover of Gold Gem and Treasure, my mate Barry Taylor is holding it, next to his yellow Hi Lux. :smile:

 

   

 

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