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I got my scoop today. I shouldve done more research before buying one but wanted to get out asap and this one shipped fast. I'll try it out tomorrow or friday. After watching some YouTube videos it seems the guys have scoops with much bigger mouths and more holes drilled. 

This is mine: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LX79QFT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

metal-detector-digging-scoop.jpg

 

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Sid,

Don't sweat it! It will do till you research, and get into the hobby  more! And it can always function as a back-up, or a loaner for a friend! You will "acquire" many tools of the trade, if you do it long enough! 👍👍

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I used to live in Jensen Beach and found my best 3 diamond Platinum ring at Port St. Lucie. For my beach detecting, I like a sand scoop with about a 12-14" handle with the scoop made out of 1/2"square screen with a metal cutting lip for the dry sand. Longer handles have too much leverage and get darn heavy when you hold the handle horizontal to shake the sand out. The square screen (hardware cloth) drains the sand much quicker than a scoop with drilled holes. Shorter handles mean bending over more. I've seen many folks dragging larger scoops behind them in the dry. Too heavy, expensive and clumsy IMHO. For the wet sand, My favorite is a modified trenching shovel that I weld small sides to and drill small holes in the bottom. The holes are an absolute must to break the suction from the wet sand.  For in the water you'll need a "Water" scoop with large basket, sharp cutting lip and they must be tough to take the pressure of pushing the scoop into the sand with your foot. I don't like this type scoop for the wet sand on the slope because you just about have to walk to the water to rinse the sand out of the scoop. With the shovel, only a quick twist of the wrist dumps the sand out. 

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I have am RTG wire scoop with adjustable handle. It  is pretty light but I find small stuff falls through the square wire mesh pretty easy. Drove me crazy trying to get a necklace out of the water and reminds me of one the arcade machines with the claw trying to get stuff. For the most part it works good.

Always wondered if anyone has tried a mud shovel?

https://www.agridrain.com/images/thumbnail.aspx?img=/webres/catalog/xl/565_NSLRMS.jpg

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2 hours ago, kac said:

I have am RTG wire scoop with adjustable handle. It  is pretty light but I find small stuff falls through the square wire mesh pretty easy. Drove me crazy trying to get a necklace out of the water and reminds me of one the arcade machines with the claw trying to get stuff. For the most part it works good.

Always wondered if anyone has tried a mud shovel?

https://www.agridrain.com/images/thumbnail.aspx?img=/webres/catalog/xl/565_NSLRMS.jpg

I like this spade but the more holes you got the less the scoop/spade will last,but the least it will stick to the bottom of the hole........i am talking of course deep wet sand ........here a lot of detectorist are using transplanting spades:

https://scotsdalegardencentre.co.uk/product-341465.html

I am always happy to try new scoop but remember it needs to be fit for the job and protect/save your back and be able to reach those deep elusive targets....

 

RR

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Good to know. I bet the salt will kill it even quicker.

Deeptech has a nice sand scoop design but the handle is too short.

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