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Steve Herschbach

Determining Where To Prospect For Gold Nuggets?

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Ask that question on any other forum and the only answer you will get is "do your research".  Steve, that is a great post, simply outstanding.

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Thanks hawkeye. My goal these days is to try and craft extremely detailed answers at one location. All future questions on the same subject then get aimed there. It means more work upfront, but saves tons of time later. And the one answer can be tweaked, tuned, and updated. Having it be part of a thread where others can contribute their own details makes it even sweeter. From now on people who email me or PM me questions can expect to get this sort of online genericized response. I spend way too much time answering the same email question over and over so this solves that issue for me. "teach a man to fish...."

I enjoy stuff like this - it makes me think it through and I inevitably find new resources for myself in the process.

My post is aimed at the U.S. To get started in Australia

Historical Gold Mines in Google Earth

Australian Mines Atlas

Western Australia Mines and Mineral Deposits

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Steve, you must type as fast as my wife-she was a legal secretary, with fingers fast as lightning!

Pieter "Heydelaar" wrote a book for Fisher about the original gold bug. Successful Nugget hunting vol one.  He included many placer areas with directions...that was where I got my start...similar books by Jim Straight and Chris Ralph have references too.

I found being on the ground to see old drywash piles and other gold areas gave me clear ideas of desert placers...mountain areas with trees and things are a lot different.

fred

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Yes....Defiantly look where gold has been found before. It cant get any easier than that.  Might sound crazy as you may think it too obvious, there will be no gold left as the old timers would have got it all & cleaned the places out. NOT SO as no one gets all the gold. Even today with detectors. . The old timers methods were often not that thorough & often lost a lot of gold out their sluice box's with poor gold catchment or too aggressive water flow. What they did do was wash off most of the overburden down to & exposing the bed rock. Perfect for detecting as the old timers couldnt see the gold caught up down in the bed rock cracks & crevices that they were missing. What the eye didnt see the heart didnt grieve over.

If the land hasnt been too modified from the old timers workings then you can use google earth to do a "fly" over & check places of mining activity. We have here in New Zealand an online site called "Papers past & present". A fantastic tool for researching old gold rush day info. It is the factual reports from back in the days of the gold discoveries & often the reporter went to "site" to report the going ons & results.

Out side of "knowing" where to go now.....you need to learn your detector. That is almost the biggest challenge for a new to detecting person.

What Steve has posted above is absolutely awesome & you should now be in no doubt of where to "look"

Good luck out there

JW :smile: 

    

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I wish  could read as fast a Steve types...I am now convinced there are two Steve Herschbach's...one that types the computer and one that hunts for gold! 

strick

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Once gain Steve you have gone above and beyond expectations.....

This is without a doubt the best forum on the net.... Kudos'.

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Two fingers, maybe 14 words per minute tops. My speed and accuracy has really gotten screwed up typing with one finger on my phone or iPad combined with spell check doing a number on me at times. As slow as I am I have to slow down more. I tend to bang stuff out, post, and go back and edit later. Sloppy!

Thanks for the kudos, the warm fuzzies make the effort worthwhile!

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Hey Steve,

Thanks for all the hard work and effort you put into this post as well as this great forum! I feel I am one step closer to that first nugget. 

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Fringe areas, that is areas just outside known producing areas, same geology, little rubbish but that is where it has been at for me for last 20 years. Takes some persistence, faith and patience to go weeks without a piece but when you hit it     ..............Wow..............

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