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very nice !  too bad the edge is so corroded.

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Nice find.

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Nice find!! Have yet to find one. 

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On 8/24/2019 at 6:05 PM, kac said:

surprised it has the detail it has. The rough edge

Agree on both counts.  Seems kind of strange that much of the coin is strong otherwise.  2 cent piece has the same composition as most pennies and I've not noticed such a debilitating effect there.  You can tell from the condition (e.g. strength of word 'STATES' and also the detail on the lines of the shield) that this coin saw very little circulation before it was dropped.  Probably dates the site to mid-1860's -- at or just after the end of the Civil War.

Check the image here (upper right corner) which shows the difference between the small motto (much scarcer) and large motto varieties of the 1864.  I don't know if it's going to make you feel better or worse if it ID's as the small motto....

https://www.pcgs.com/coinfacts/coin/1864-2c-small-motto-bn/3579

 

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Great thread title and a great find also

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Thanks.

I have no clue why the edges were so beat up. It was in a pine forest that usually destroy copper so it being bronze might explain a lot. Maybe the alloy wasn't mixed as well as it could be Bronze being copper and tin, who knows. Will go back to that area once the frost comes as much of it is shin-knee deep in poison ivy.

Does look like a small moto :0

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9 hours ago, kac said:

Does look like a small moto :0

From the Cherrypickers' Guide (https://www.amazon.com/Cherrypickers-Varieties-Official-Whitman-Guidebook-ebook/dp/B008OAZJY0/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2YVS6NA9B49AR&keywords=cherrypickers+guide&qid=1568378966&s=gateway&sprefix=Cherrypick%2Caps%2C169&sr=8-3)

Survival Estimate:  500-1000.  Interest among collectors:  Very High (this is the highest on their scale).  Liquidity Factor:  Will sell easily, and often above listed value (also highest on their scale).  Of course this assumes collectible condition.  😢  If a small motto, I guess you just have to be satisfied you found one of the two key date 2-cent pieces ever minted for circulation (only behind the 1872).  I'd take that.

 

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Wow, thats some nice research. Now I'm going to have to wallow around knee deep in poison ivy to find the 72!

I looked it up and compared the front and it is a large moto. Font is more refined and thinner than the small moto.

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..............      Source link     .............

 

DATE GOOD FINE EXTREMELY FINE UNCIRCULATED
1864 2-Cent (Small Motto) $225 $400 $850 $1,000
1864 2-Cent (Large Motto) $15 $25 $50 $80
1865 2-Cent $15 $25 $50 $80
1866 2-Cent $19 $27 $50 $80
1867 2-Cent $20 $30 $50 $80
1868 2-Cent $20 $36 $75 $110
1869 2-Cent $25 $40 $80 $125
1870 2-Cent $35 $55 $135 $200
1871 2-Cent $40 $85 $150 $225
1872 2-Cent $400 $600 $1,050 $1,650

 

Two Cents (1864-1873)

 

a2-Cent-e1444097167743.jpg.pagespeed.ic.

The Two Cent coin was produced by the United States Mint from 1864 to 1873. While the coin was used primarily for circulation purposes, mint year 1873 was produced with collectors in mind.

The most common date found for the Two Cent piece is 1864. This was the coin’s first year of mintage and the U.S. Mint produced over 20 million of these coins. There were two distinct varieties produced, however, the large motto and the small motto.

The small motto is the less common of the two types, and one of these coins can potentially fetch $200 or more depending on its condition. An 1864 small motto Two Cent coin in extremely fine condition can fetch nearly $600 or more.

 

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