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Came across a post on Facebook, about this gentleman testing a few aftermarket coils. This really opened my eyes this morning. I was under the impression that the Minelab coils were chipped and no aftermarket coils could be used. If this was the case? Why did they wait so long? The smaller coil would suit my needs just perfectly.   http://golddetecting.forumotion.net/t26022-gpz-18-coil-test-report

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Edited by Sourdough Scott
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It is with great interest that I have been following the development of these coils on the Australian 4umer forum.

Having had a good run with the GPZ7000, (found enough gold to pay for it in less than two weeks) I looked forward to the production of the 19" coil which promised much extra depth. (according to the advertising, one could expect at least 30% more than the standard 14" coil) After much delay, I was at my local ML dealer early on the day of release. When I picked up the box I wondered what else could be in there, as surely all that weight could not be just a coil. Wrong. Oh, well, never mind, if it gives me all that extra depth I can put up with the weight. The appalling design meant I had to make up a workable skid plate, as the one supplied had little rubber patches that gripped on any grass, and worked as a brake.

 After exhaustive testing I could not get the thing to perform any where near the claims of the manufacturer, and the settings suggested by ML's 'guru' were just unworkable in most Victorian ground. I did find gold with it, but there was little hope that it would "unlock all those big nuggets at greater depth".

I then made the mistake of posting my findings on the 4umer forum, and stated that the 19" coil was over weight, over rated and over priced. I called it 'The Dog'. (a name that stuck) Having once been a tester for ML, finding hundreds of ounces with some of their prototypes, I mistakenly believed that I had some sort of credibility. Wrong again. I was abused, denigrated, and accused of being a sour old 'has been'.

To compound the situation, I was involved in testing a new Australian built and designed detector, which then resulted in another Australian forum devoting eleven pages of some really disgusting and personal abuse. One member of management of 4umer then banned JR Beatty and myself from their forum for life. Reason given. Trouble making.

I now read with great amusement: "I and a lot of others got burnt by the ML 19" coil"  Slim Pickins - 4umer management.

Exonerated, after all this time?????

 

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Reg, please leave the grievances you have with other individuals on other forums at the door when you enter. This forum exists in large part for people, you included, to get away from all that. So don’t bring it here. Thank you.

There has been a thread about these aftermarket coils ongoing since April on the Minelab Forum.

 

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Steve, I merely made the point that honesty is not always the best policy if one wishes to avoid abuse, and we the prospecting public are sometimes just tools for profitability. To not speak out about products that are less than claimed only encourages companies to continue to take us for granted.

I wish the company producing these coils all the best, but regret that this advance has had to come from Europe and not Australia. From what I can gather both Coiltek and Nuggetfinder wanted to produce aftermarket coils for the 7000 but for whatever reason were unable to do so. This has been a less than desirable situation, as there has certainly been demand for such products. Healthy competition is always beneficial for us the consumers, but has been lacking in this area.

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1 hour ago, Reg Wilson said:

Steve, I merely made the point that honesty is not always the best policy if one wishes to avoid abuse, and we the prospecting public are sometimes just tools for profitability. To not speak out about products that are less than claimed only encourages companies to continue to take us for granted.

Perhaps that is the case elsewhere but not here. Anyone is welcome, in fact encouraged, to post honest reviews based on actual use. I have never deleted a negative review of any product as long as it is above board and avoids name calling and stays factual/dispassionate in nature. Anyone abusing other forum members may be banned without warning. I simply will not tolerate it.

All I ever ask is people realize opinions can vary as to product usefulness and applicability at locations around the world. Each persons experience applies to them alone and do not apply globally. My opinions apply to my uses at my locations for my purposes and your opinions are based on your locations for your purposes. Therefore opinions may differ and any wise person looks at a wide range of opinions instead of relying on any one source. Cross talk and weighing in on people personally is never called for. The bottom line is I am sorry other forums allow that kind of behavior but I do not. That includes dredging up grievances from other forums and bringing it here. I expect this to be the end of the discussion on that matter. Thank you.

This thread is about these aftermarket coils. Let’s stay on topic.

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Yes it's me that posted up about the new aftermarket coil on facebook and have been helping Stan do some testing, this 1 coil is in Australia and, now another 2 have arrived so there is only 3 in total so it takes some time to make sure they will work well and hopefully give the GPZ7000 users some extra choices in a range of coils.

I mostly use the GPZ14" coil on my 7000 but I did run the 18" prototype coil on my 7000 for a week or so and found a bit over an oz of gold with it in total, and the biggest nugget I found with it was a 4.14 gram nugget at aprox 8" deep in extremely mineralized  ironstone ground in Western Australia, as this is where all the testing has been done in Australia so far.

I was very impressed with the prototype 18" coil, it weighs about the same as the 14"GPZ coil has great sensitivity and I found it in some ways similar to a mono coil around the outer edge and the extra coverage with the bigger coil compared to the standard 14"GPZ was also a bonus.  It was finding nuggets from 0.1g up to 4.14g and plenty of 0.5g and 1.0g sizes.

Stan found some quit large pieces in his 6 day detecting trip, which he has posted about on the other forum

It ran very similar on the same ground when compared to the standard 14"GPZ coil  

I am looking forward to testing the other size coils as well.

cheers dave

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Another picture of some more coils that will be getting tested for the 7000, really looking forward to testing these.

 

cheers dave

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If this overseas company can do it why can't or wont Coiltek &/or Nuggetfinder, or even Minelab for that matter??

JW :smile:

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19 minutes ago, kiwijw said:

If this overseas company can do it why can't or wont Coiltek &/or Nuggetfinder, or even Minelab for that matter??

JW :smile:

Good question JW, as far as I know Nuggetfinder did some work on this very thing and for whatever reason stopped, and the others, well Minelab could for sure if they wanted to, but no word if they are or have, so overseas entrepreneurs have taken up the challenge and have something that works, does it work better, well that's where/why a bit more testing is going to be happening with this latest batch of 4 coils.

 

cheers dave   

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