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What a life you have lived Steve, I can't wait to read the next part.  You Dad sounds like a great guy.

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Cool Steve, I had the pop-corn only just popping when the "to be continued" came along. :laugh: look forward to it. Thanks.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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The 4 D's & a P.

Dream, Dredge, Detector, Dad with a plane sure can make a young mans life enjoyable.  So cool to read.

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Steve, our telephone number was 3 shorts and a long.... remember yours?

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Nope, I was a mere tyke Harry. I remember the old crank phone more for what happened to it later. It sat around in a shed and my friends and I played with it electrocuting each other by turning the crank while holding the wires. Funny what makes for a toy when you have to make your own! :smile:

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Very good Steve, I remember the party line. Also started with a 3” dredge bought from your store around ‘79 or ‘80, was on an inner tube. Super Cub on 36” tires best thing out there with a good pilot. I see this being a long story, can’t wait for more

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Hey Bob! My fathers Cub had smaller tires if my thinking is right. I have seen those 36” tires and they are crazy tall. I am thinking ours were more like 24” - 28”? Anyway, we had some good times at Mills! Thanks for any help you give John. 🙂

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