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mn90403

Google Chrome And Xchange2

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As a result of the Minelab 7000 firmware update I had reason to revisit Xchange2.

My story is that I had my main copy of Xchange2 on a computer that crashed.  My backup laptop included a copy that didn't support the 3030 and 7000.  I didn't want to loose the 3030 data so I renamed some files.

When I used Google Chrome to go to Minelab and download the Xchange2 program a popup came from Google and said this was a fishing site or malware site and could not download the Xchange2 program.  I had to open the Microsoft Edge (Exchange Browser) and get the file and install it that way.

Has anyone had Google Chrome block a Minelab download?

Mitchel

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No. All I use is Chrome and no issues. However, if you install the update on the GPZ then your GPZ will no longer work with XChange. A fix is in the works but may be awhile.

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Steve,

Thanks for the reply.

I got the update and transferred the file on Chrome just fine.  

I was just not able to get Xchange2.  Maybe it is the extension.  The download was blocked.

Is the GPS disabled on the 7000?  If it is still working it just can't be shared on Xchange2?

Mitchel

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The GPS works you just can't interface the detector with XChange to do anything with saving the data. I may experiment if I get time for a work around.

I tried the XChange download again and it worked fine, here is the direct link:

XChange 2 Application (1.8.7-1.1.10) (69.54 MB)

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Has anybody heard anything about the Xchange 2 problem being fixed, as it was not compatible  with the latest software upgrade for the 7000 was released many many months ago.  I am not sure why there has been no progress on the xchange2 problem and I get it that some people don't use it nor do they care, but for those of us that do use it and want it fixed as there has been ample time for Minelab programmers or whoever it is that fixes this stuff to get on with it.

 

We paid top $ for a top of the range ML GPZ7000 which had all these features and now it is crippled and it should be fixed.

 

cheers dave  

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I agree. It seems the Equinox release has all hands on deck and everything else stalled in the meantime? Still, for those who paid the big bucks it is a situation of having to choose to run the older firmware to have XChange functional, or newer firmware to get the new Patch Mode etc. My solution with the season near upon me is to go back to the old firmware. I really should not have to do that, but right now it seems the only option.

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Once again I ask the question.  If you use the new firmware and record GPS finds or waypoints this data should be in a data file, right?  If you switch back to the old firmware that can interface with Exchange2 then it should look for the data file, right?  I just don't know if it can see the data file on the GPZ so that it will transfer to the Exchange2 program.

Once done the data is backed up.  You could clear the data on the GPZ and then install the new version of GPZ firmware and repeat.

I would like to do this and try but I had an 'issue' with using an Exchange2 that was/was not compatible with my 3030.  I had installed different programs and then had a drive crash so ... I'm SOL. 

Too many other things on my plate right now to try it but in my mind if the data file uses the same extensions then it should be available for transfer.

Mitchel

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The whole X Change thing was a pain in the backside, and outmoded before it began. Just a time waster and 'technology for technologies sake'. I soon gave up on it.

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Reg,

I know what you mean.  I do use the GPS to my advantage when hunting the beaches.  I sometimes forget how many rings I find in a particular area and then I look at my map and slow down and the boundaries of the wave patch are clear.  The problem is that it only holds so many and then you have to save them on another device.

All of that could have been easier.

Mitchel

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3 hours ago, mn90403 said:

Once again I ask the question.  If you use the new firmware and record GPS finds or waypoints this data should be in a data file, right?  If you switch back to the old firmware that can interface with Exchange2 then it should look for the data file, right?  I just don't know if it can see the data file on the GPZ so that it will transfer to the Exchange2 program.

Anything saved when running the newer firmware can't be accessed when downgrading to the older firmware. The data files are not compatible. The only way right now to have a functional GPZ interface with XChange is stay with the older firmware.

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