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The Face Value Total Of The Coins You Found In 2020 ?


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$43 or so in clad that actually went through the Coinstar. 
 

Not counting rejects, copper pennies, and old coins and silver coins found.  Probably less than $50 total face value. 
 

I spent most of the time I had available chasing older coins and jewelry (digging trash) and learning my Equinox 600. I do wonder what would be possible just cherry picking clad....

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I never really to see how much I had found as I was more interested in the older ones.

Since I am not at home I could not answer how much to older ones came to so please forgive me for not knowing.

This year I will do a better job at keeping track of my finds.

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$59.02 in new coins (averaging $0.19/hr).  I'm after old coins.  Relics, jewelry, and new coins come along for the ride if they TID in the coin zones (12-13 and 20 and above on the ML Equinox).  (If there's the possibility of the small denom coins of the 19th century such as 3 cent and silver 5 cent, or gold coins then I open up my selection criteria.)

An exception is zinc pennies, which I sometimes ignore (must be a very strong signal in the 19-20 TID range to be ignored).  If I had dug every one of those signals I might have made $60 for the year.  😁  Not enough to even buy a used coil.... :sad:

I could include the old coins for the year.  That would amount to ~3+ dollars in face value.  But for me those are an entirely different breed.

A couple of asterisks for the year:  1) I didn't find a single USA brass dollar in 311 hours of detecting (almost all park hunting).  2) I found around 30 brass arcade tokens, most of them along the sides of a (long) road.  I suspect someone was paid to distribute them ('loss leader' advertising) and they took a 'shortcut' and sprinkled them out the window of a moving car.  I think these were from the 1980's (and/or later) when there were entire rooms full of electo-mechanincal and electronic machines for kids to surrender their allowances, etc.

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37 minutes ago, GB_Amateur said:

I think these were from the 1980's (and/or later) when there were entire rooms full of electo-mechanincal and electronic machines for kids to surrender their allowances, etc.

Back in my day, I surrendered my allowance to those rooms of electro-mechanical and electronic machines... one quarter at a time (2 if it was a high end one) .. haha.  🙂

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   Don't know yet! I haven't cashed in the last four years worth! But i can say with confidence that it won't break the bank, or my back!🤣👍👍

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Years ago before the 70’s people would ask how much in coin value can you find in a year . Lots of you may not believe me what I’m about to say but that’s okay. I’d tell them if you get out and hunt like I do you can average about 6 hundred to a thousand each year. I’m sure some say bull shot I don’t believe that. 
 What you have to remember it just wasn’t many of nuts like me out there. When I got into detecting I’d come home from work I’d walk in the front door and walk out the back with detector in hand. I started out hunting along the Texas coast because that’s where I was working at the time but not much being nothing waterproof.

 I’ve gone for months and never see another person with a detector. My luck continued on into the 70’s but over time my finds tapered off . Now sometimes I go out with more  money in my pocket than found.

 The beautiful thing it was all silver and if you later found a clad coin you’d say how did that trash get in here. haha  

The Best To A long But Not Lost Memory.

 Chuck 

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64.5 cents. 😀 Found an 1809 half cent. This doesn't count the cut pistareens.

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 I follow my  buddy   Clad  Hoppers       rule and dig quarter signals as it  could be a big silver ring.If it takes 30 seconds at most usually to dig a quarter and that=$ 30 a hour for   your time on that target.Hunting for clad would be a lot of fun if $1 and $2 coins were plentiful.Clad hopper had  about  $300 and that was  mostly at the beach. For a cashless society  i never saw more coins found on the beach for a year.He loves his  Nox on the beach and did not bring his At gold out  at all there.The $1 coins are scarce and I average about 3 a year.I  wish that they were as  common as a quarter.I got  $9.30 in the sand one day and that is with people hunting it all the time.

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 To tell   the truth with all the different quarters and $1 dollar coins being  made filling up a book would be fun  by trying  to get them with a detector.  Keep the best looking one you have for the book and spend the rest .Remember   those West point quarters are a circulating clad coin  and it is  valuable. 

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