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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/08/2021 in all areas

  1. Hey Guys, Well its that time of year where most of the US Prospectors are searching for gold, in the Southwest at least. I managed to get out this weekend with some friends, just roaming around some old stomping grounds in hopes to turn up a few bits missed years prior. I was toggling between my GPZ 7000 with the NF 12" coil and my GPX 6000 with the 11" coil. My other two friends were using the GPZ 7000's with the stock 14x13" coils. Later in the day I can across some old piles left from prior mining and got a softer sounding signal and decided to investigate. My friends both had a few dinks now, so I was behind on the gold count. There's a lot of left behind rubbish in this area due to prior mining, hardrock and placering. I figured it was just another deep nail or something, but as I got down deeper, the target was actually on bedrock below the pile. I ended up scratching everything away from the bedrock and pinpointed the target in a crevice or depression (seen in picture below). Low and behold, it was a nice gold nugget, 4.6 Dwt's, just shy of 1/4 Troy Ounce. I was pleasantly surprised to say the least, didn't expect it. I thought this would be good time to see if my Minelab GPX 6000 would hear this target with the stock 11" coil on it. I walked back to my truck, got the GPX 6000 and hiked back to the target location. I figured this would be a crude, but interesting test as there is so much debate on depth and how now many believe the GPX 6000 is better. I fired the GPX 6000, balanced and make sure the EMI was good, then scanned over the target area with the nugget back in it's original location. I couldn't hear a peep of a signal, which honestly is what I figured. I didn't expect to find it, or hear it with the GPX 6000. I played around with a few settings and even had my buddies come over to check it out. They both scanned their stock coils (GPZ 7000 with 14x13") over it, both heard the target, but it was still faint (not a super obvious signal). This is one reason it's hard for me to put down the GPZ 7000, I have found many nuggets at depth, but deal with the heavy, bulky unit. I thought about going back and trying the 14" DD to see what it would have done, but for the most part, I never use the 14" DD, so it wouldn't have really proved anything to me, as I don't use it. It would have been interesting to see what the 17" coil would have done, but I didn't have it with me. I would think the 17" would have heard it. I'm swinging the GPZ 7000 with the NF 12" Round coil 90% of the time, the GPX 6000 about 10% of the time. There are some bedrock gullies I have revisited in years, so I'm looking forward to spending more time there with the 6000 and 11" Mono coil. I think I also might be able to pack the GPX 6000 into a few canyons as I wasn't easily able to do that with the GPZ 7000. Here are a few pictures below. I didn't have a tape measure, but Doc's pick is 22" handle length. I'm thinking between 18-20 inches was the true detection depth, but faint signal for sure.
    16 points
  2. We've had nice weather here in the Midwest the past week or so and after getting out Wednesday I was doubling up on Thursday afternoon. The curve ball mentioned in the thread title was breaking an ML Equinox 11" coil ear when loading the car, which I described in the appropriate thread. Fortunately I have both the 6" and 12"x15" coils (but not the Coiltek 5"x10" yet). I'm detecting a park with not too much iron or aluminum trash so I figured the large coil would be OK, as long as it didn't mess up my elbow swinging a heavy coil through the deep grass. (Wet and warm early autumn hasn't met with the Parks Department's mowing budget....) First target was showing low 20's (typically an aluminum screw cap) and out popped a clad dime. Hmmm, that should have been 25-26. Was the larger coil giving different dTID's. Going back over the hole answered the question -- 20-21 and out comes a Zincoln. I don't think the two coins were touching but they were super close to each other leading to the anomalous dTID initially. 15 minutes into the hunt I get a Wheatie, not too deep (3-4 inches). That's the age coin I'm looking for. Maybe an hour later after the typical occasional can slaw, a couple rusty nails, and a few modern coins I got a nice sounding but inconsistent tone & dTID. From one direction as I swept close to the target location left-right I was getting hi-lo-hi-lo... tones (14-19 = pulltab zone is set for a medium tone whereas 20 and up are high tones; the tone was alternating between these two). This is not typical of coins in my experience by any means so I'm thinking a flattened, non-symmetric aluminum screw cap. I don't remember the exact strength indicator value but I'm sure it was at least 5, maybe mostly 6, possibly occassional 7. I also don't remember the dTID at a 90 degree compass change angle of approach but I'm sure it was at least high 20's (large, elongated can slaw?). The tone volume told me it wasn't a near-surface coin-sized object. Definitely good enough to dig. Weak(er) signal strength means take a good sized plug so about 7"-8" diameter and 5" deep was my start. The Garrett Carrot (set at max gain = 3) said I was in the right spot and switching to the fine tuning White's TRX told me I had a localized (coin-like size) target which was between 1" and 2" deeper than the current hole depth. I carefully cut about a tennis ball sized chunk of dirt centered on the TRX signal's centroid and upon removal was told the target was in that glob. Breaking it up with my fingers I saw a coin but it wasn't immediately obvious if modern clad or silver. Again, careful not to scratch I picked off a clod of dirt and saw the familiar (from dimes I've found 🙂 Barber Head. See middle coin in photo: Only my 3rd silver quarter ever and 1st Barber Quarter, others being Washingtons. (Guess I'm going to skip the Standing Liberties. ) Even better than being 19th Century date was the -S mintmark. Left coin in the photo is actually a 1919-S which I found the previous day probably less than 10 m away from where I found the quarter. So -S mint oldies in consecutive days, and neither is particularly common although neither is a semi-key. On the right is a 1941 Merc which I found last week, so three consecutive hunts with non-penny old coins. That's very good for me in my current public sites. Why the anomalous dTID from one direction? I wonder if the coin was oriented on-edge. So what's the big 'A'? Some of you recognize this as the Atlanta Braves initial. For those who don't follow our North American professional baseball, they just won the annual championship (not so modestly called 'World Series') for their first time in a quarter century. They were underdogs vs. at least their last two playoff opponents. But there is a detecting connection. I sometimes hunt in rural areas during Autumn and that is prime (gun) hunting season. I have other bright (orange) garb but I wanted a baseball cap (easier to accomodate headphones) and I saw this hat at a flea market for $5 a few years back. I wonder if I can sell it now for a profit. Anyone interested?
    10 points
  3. The GPZ7000 is still king of the mountain for outright depth but it takes commitment and strength to use, this is especially poignant when you’ve had the privilege of using the 6000 for any period of time and discovered the joys of a well balanced lightweight machine. I have a picture in my mind for the use of these machines, the 6000 is a fast paced zip zip like machine that can be slowed down but its overall behaviour just loves to be scooted along, even its audio is zippy. It is very talkative and lively, constantly on the go ready for anything, so very capable of instantaneous reaction to the tiniest of nuggets. At the same time it has amazing depth for a detector of its ilk so time spent swinging it isn’t wasted if you do manage to get your coil over a deeper piece. It would have to be the best detector I’ve ever seen for out of the box ease of use, pushing well ahead of the SDC 2300 because of its ergonomics and light weight. The 7000 on the other hand just loves smooth control, pendulum like smooth control. The better you can control the coils movement the greater the rewards. It’s audio is set up to be slow and methodical, it is cautionary in all it does and likes to think and mull over everything before it speaks. It is oil upon the waters smooth and does not like to rush, as such its behaviour compliments the deeper more subtle edge of detection signal responses. To get the best out of the 7000 requires personal training and setup, in-depth learning and investment in time spent in the field, even after all this time I am still learning the GPZ7000. I‘m fortunate I have both detectors, depending on my mood I go easily from one to the other. Sometimes I just want to go have some fun without all the mental focus, my ultra excited super motivated friend the GPX6000 is always primed and ready to find some gold just about anywhere I care to go, it is the ultimate skunk-buster and has never let me down. Other times I just want to go swing a coil and focus on depth with smoothness and control, let my mind drift into the ultra smooth threshold and patiently wait for that one deep signal. I find the 7000 to be calming and soulful an un-flurried methodical order that just ‘feels right’, when in motion it has a grounded presence that suits its personality. It’s raining in here today and I’m feeling cool and reflective 😂 JP Pic of gold I recently found with the GPX6000, found the first piece with the 7000 and worked it with the 6000 as the size of the gold and frequency of digging suited it perfectly. 186 pieces in 4 x half detecting days. Pic of a nice chunky very deep 7 gram piece I got last Saturday found in perfect for the GPZ7000 detecting ground.
    8 points
  4. I took the Impulse AQ out yesterday to hit some areas of the beach with a negative tide. Although I didn't uncover any deep old gold, I did uncover this silver ring in the third scoop down. (maybe it was that deep or maybe my pinpoint was off) There are no hallmarks but it has the correct patina for a silver ring that had been in the saltwater a long time. I tested it with 18K acid and it turned the line blue. I also fired up my Equinox 800 and it hit loud and proud at 38. The ring is size 13 1/4 and weighs 33.1 grams. It has a Tortoise shell type inlays around it. This the second "big boy" silver ring that I have found with the Impulse this year. But this one is by far the biggest by weight. This is another reason that I love metal detecting, getting to share "unusual" finds with others. I would gladly hand this one back to its owner if confronted. LOL Enjoy the pics and HH!!! Joe
    7 points
  5. Hey Guys, Thanks for all the comments. JP - I agree, I'm still old school like with the SD2000, hunt very methodically - low and slow. I guess this is why it's hard for me to part completely with the GPZ 7000. I believe she's a powerhouse if you can handle the weight and really pay attention to what the detector is telling you. I also agree with Steve when he originally stated that most of the US prospectors would benefit mostly from the GPX 6000 over the 7000 due to it's features (hyper sensitivity to small gold and specimens, light weight, super easy to operate). I will continue to toggle back in forth depending on the ground and type of gold I'm chasing. There are handfuls of small gullies where I cleaned a bunch of nuggets up, so I'm looking forward to getting back to a few of these locations this season with the GPX 6000. P.S. If I could tell any electronic prospector something I learned over the years - Focus on what you have (detector) and use it to it's best ability. You can't worry about what you don't have or what you might miss. I hear way too many prospectors say well I could miss a specimen, I could miss a small nugget, I could miss a deep one. You can worry yourself to death about a "potential" signal that your detector never heard. Rob
    7 points
  6. I had a nice little surprise this afternoon. Our club meeting was this afternoon and I thought I’d go hunt for a while before the meeting. I was glad I did. Nothing great but anything thing civil war left there are few and far between. I took the Deus and was using g Max then switching to 6 deep to check the target so nothing fancy just factory settings. There’s a lot of trash as you’d expect in a park. I was just playing but trying to learn if I could get any tell that would help in the decision to dig or not. This particular target sounded not bad but very similar to a lot of the other targets. However this time the line in the graph was better. I said to myself hmmm better check this out. Out popped a three ringer! I’m pretty sure this target had been hit before but nobody dug it. Just a little extra info caused me to investigate and recover another mini from the 1861 battle here.
    6 points
  7. As someone who does almost all my hunting in mild soils the biggest stand out to me is target ID stability when using multi frequency machines, although I'm mostly just talking about Minelab Equinox and Vanquish which are essentially the same in this scenario, both give equally good target ID's and could be easily mistaken for each other, no single frequency machine I own comes even remotely close to what they can do for ID stability at depth. As someone who hunts a lot digging minimal holes ID stability is very important to me, the other detector which I use is the CTX 3030 which again is multi frequency and also does very well with target ID stability although not all that much better than the NOX, if at all in most cases. All three of these detectors can identify very deep coins in my soil with very stable target ID's. 10 inches is no big deal here, coins are often deeper and I'm getting confident dig me ID's on them. If I switch the Nox to single frequency on any of the frequencies I don't have the same stable ID's as I do in Multi frequency. Now, when it comes to single frequency machines on coins often they will go as deep, when it comes to depth I find coil size means more than machine, my Ace 300i with the Nel Tornado 13x12" can find any coin my Nox can with the 15x12" on at depth in my low trash environment, quite easily. I wouldn't be at all surprised if I pulled deeper cojns with it than the Nox so I don't really think about depth as being part of the equation when it comes to multi frequency. I find it's an insignificant factor to outright depth in mild ground. Gold jewellery maybe different and a higher frequency or multi frequency detector may do better, I don't find enough of that with any detector to make an educated guess on that. Target ID stability at depth is the defining factor for me, and that's the Multi IQ and CTX hands down, although the Gold Bug Pro is a single frequency machine and does reasonably well with ID's at depth, better than any other single frequency machine I own and if I didn't have the Minelab's it would be my single frequency of choice, although in that situation I'd update it to the Time Ranger Pro to get the better feature set. I did this thread some time ago when I was trying to demonstrate why I like certain detectors and coils in my mild soil with the Target ID's they can get, and this is a high EMI area affecting ID's but still, there are very obvious clear winners. If I had an area that I could dig as many holes as I wanted with little concern I could do just as well with my Ace 300i and Tornado coil as I could my Equinox in my hunting environment of minimal iron trash, the main trash I deal with is pull tabs and occasional bottle caps which really are both things I should be digging as NZ silver coins come up right at pull tabs, and $1 and $2 coins come up as alloy bottle caps 🙂 I actually really enjoy using my Ace. When it comes to digging limited holes and reliable ID's in mild soils nothing compares to multi frequency.
    5 points
  8. There are two different Whink formulations, one based on oxalic acid (the safer), and one based on 1% HF (the more aggressive). Oxalic based will only attack rust stains, hydrofluoric based will attack silica minerals. The HF will take care of some issues the oxalic will not, but has a much higher chance of “frosting” the appearance of silica minerals with more than short exposures. Beware the safety issues - please refer to this thread for details!
    5 points
  9. Beach hunt # 9 this past Thursday. Nice day, sunny and warm. Met up with a forum member and it is always nice to see him and chat. I wanted to take the GPX into shallow water and see what lies deep, so I decided to fill a sock with beach sand and weigh down my coil. I zip tied it to the shaft and rested it on the coil……Bad idea! 😄 I think I ended up breaking a wire inside the cable going into the coil. The coil just screams when I’m swinging it, like it is responding to a huge target. So, In my haste to get going that morning, I did not pack a second coil. Prior to breaking, I did start hitting a nice line of copper pennies including 3 wheats (a ’10, ’37 & ’44). I think my coil was almost broken anyways since it’s over 3 years old and gets a lot of beach and woods use. So, I’ll be looking to get a replacement soon. Pulled out the Equinox for a rare above the knee water hunt. Waters were quiet but I did manage to get a little bit of clad and what I thought was going to be a stupid zinc penny turned out to be a Ruger 9MM bullet. Next time I WILL be more careful shaking the scoop around. 😲All in all, it was still fun in the sun. I may return there as I just picked up a used E Trac to do some deep silver grass hunting. Some will say use the Equinox, but the target ID on the E Trac is more to my liking.
    5 points
  10. Great find, but isn't it a napkin ring? Looks to big to be a mans ring to me, just wondering because I have seen something similar at Bed Bath & Beyond before.
    4 points
  11. Great finds and glad to see you get them out of the ground. I always like to read your adventures and how well you detail your finds. Wish you more luck on your next hunt, not to many more warm days in this part of the country for us. Sorry I won't buy anything sports because of the strikes they have pulled. Grandfather refused to watch since the players held hostage the World Series, and then the rest of the games started the same thing. They are over paid people playing a game and that is all.
    4 points
  12. Great find. Any date older than your own is a good win. As you get older the date of a good find gets harder.😭
    4 points
  13. Please please Steve don't shut them down I am trying to legitimize them with my new technology break thru. related to electron magnetic field that occurs 79 times a second when they align in a particular pattern. I know my price is high so the offer is not for sale but hire/rent of $7000 a week but it will need less time than ML GPX6000 to find both small and larger particles of gold. I have a built in chip that will only allow rental time before it shutdown requiring renewable rent to reset it. You may get an idea how it works by looking at the difference in the two diagrams of the electron below caught at different positions. Together, intelligent coding assistance and ergonomic design. The new G_J Model of Gold and Junk detector. Please do not rent or hire, with out checking it's write up on Detector Prospector about it's tuning and effectiveness by S.H. .......... 🤑
    4 points
  14. Nailed it Steve. That's exactly what I've been thinking. Although I think the Nox was a bit of an accident as it's made little need for a GM1000.
    4 points
  15. The X6 was never intended to replace the Z, rather than compliment it. If I’m wandering billy goat country and gullies, I have the X6 on, if I’m in wide open spaces where I know there’s deeper gold, I’ve got the Z on. Nice piece!
    4 points
  16. Went up to the racetrack again yesterday, thought these finds deserve a post of their own. There is a small plot of land next to where the house stood. It had a barn and the cemetery behind it. It's about a half acre. Lots of corn stalks 😵 At first the going was kinda risky, the wind was blowing about 20 mph, big low off the coast. I had to search under trees in the background and these were falling everywhere. If any of you have ever been hit in the head by one of these Black Walnuts, you know what the fun part is. They were coming down like rain. I suppose I could have waited a few more days but hunting season starts soon. The trees are about 50' or more, and they get a bit of velocity. 😀 I really didn't expect to find much at all, a scout search last spring gave no indication there was anything good here, but I was determined to grid something out of it after my finds from previous days. This is another example of "persistence pays off". All of these relics are very old. A pistol ball, an as yet unidentified fired ~45 cal bullet (the sharp end is throwing me off). The first button says "Gilt Colour" and something else on the back and still has some thread. Second has a triangle on the front and possibly some other marks, and says "Plated" on the back. The third is my favorite, an ancient convex Tombac with some off-center engraving. It has a square shank boss on the back. By afternoon someone was shooting a handgun in my direction, must have fired about 100 rounds. I didn't hear any "snaps" so I presumed the shooter was on a lower elevation and hoped there was a backstop. 🙄 Guess I'm gonna have to get a boat horn. 😵 Another bit of excitement was coming across two of these "little" guys building webs across the corn stalks in front of me. The Yellow Garden Spider can grow to 1 1/2 inches in body length. They rarely bite but if they do you know it, those fangs flip out. I'm glad that metal detectors are out in front. 😀 I let them both carry on... 😬
    3 points
  17. I found kind of an older park I hadn't been to before and did a couple of hunts two days in a row. I was using my Equinox, 10x5" coil, Park=2, Sensitivity=20, FE2=0, Recovery=6, Horseshoe=On, Discrimination=Mental. The first day I was passing on obvious iron and trash. I found a 1964 Memorial penny, so I thought there might be hope. The first day no silver, but I did find what I thought might be a gold ring, but now I'm not so sure. It has a weird stamp so I think it might be plated. The second day, same settings, but I hit the woods across from the park and dug everything that sounded good. That acounts for the older looking junk. Then I went back to the sports field in the park and got a pretty good 12 with a little iron sounds about 6 inches down. I thought it could be a deep nickel, but when I brought the target up, it was another ring. There were a bunch of people in the park by this time so I quietly slipped the ring in my pouch and moved on. This time I thought I had silver for sure, but when I got home and cleaned it up a little I found out I was wrong again... it turned out to be 10K White Gold! 4.8 grams. So I'm still chasing the Silver Unicoin, but I'm sure happy about a little gold. Day 1 Day 2
    3 points
  18. Here are a few pictures of some all time popular coils that are ‘similar in size’🥴, all of them have their place, all of them are noticeably different to each other, all of them have found a lot of gold and in a very large amount of cases all are collectively owned by individuals. 🙉 🙈............🙊 And I’d be prepared to put money down that Rob has successfully used them all. NF 12x8 Evo NF 14x9 Evo Coiltek 14x9 Elite NF 12” Evo NF Zsearch 12 Minelab GPZ14
    3 points
  19. Nice hunting GB. love your analytical approach to each target. Precise surgical extraction of the target using two pin pointers no less. Your enthusiasm and knowledge about coins is impressive. The hat you might find a sucker for it.... or may get you shot depending on where your hunting lol. Valen Im with you....I get more enjoyment watching a dog chase a ball then these modern day circus clowns who make up professional sports. Strick
    3 points
  20. Simon said it well. If you don't have digging restrictions and you don't care what you are digging, as in if it beeps and gives the wrong numerical target ID or no numerical target ID, who cares. Marrying the right frequency for your desired targets along with high enough gain to punch deep, you don't need simultaneous multi frequency. Selectable single frequency in mild ground will do just fine and will go just as deep or deeper than SMFs, even the Equinox, CTX 3030 and Etrac using similar sized and type coils. I don't have time to dig and find out afterwards what the target is or the freedom to dig lots of big holes with a shovel at most of the places I coin and jewelry hunt. So, I have to spend the big bucks on SMF detectors since I have digging restrictions and most of all, I like to basically know what i'm about to recover or what I'm about to leave in the ground.
    3 points
  21. Yup, the GPX has rubber gaskets on each end of the control box from the factory which would keep all sand out and restrict waters ingress, and you can put rubber boots on the switches to keep sand/dirt/dust/water out of them, they just screw right on. The GPX can easily be made a suitable machine for on the beach without too much concern about the sand. You can also put a protective neoprene cover on the control box if you want extra protection. Mines been through a lot of heavy rain with no problems too. My 4500 has now become my black sand beach detector.
    3 points
  22. Great detecting attitude, school. I can see why you are so successful. I'll speak for both myself and the rest of the animal world and thank you for picking up plastic trash. Now, go find some precious!
    3 points
  23. Minelab has a particular genius for producing detectors that occupy distinct niches. Even if they could make just one detector that did everything the best, it would make little sense from a business perspective. They always make sure each model has its own secret sauce that justifies somebody wanting it. As of late, controlling what coils get produced seems critical to maintaining that product differentiation. Despite Equinox, the CTX 3030 still sells because it does some things well an Equinox does not. Similarly, it was never their desire to produce a detector that sells for less than the GPZ 7000 that would replace it. Sheppo nailed it - the models complement each other. One does not replace the other, by full planning and intent on Minelabs part. That should really surprise nobody. Lots of things make more sense as regards Minelab if you take off your prospector hat, and put your business person/investor hat on instead.
    3 points
  24. Way to go GB! 👍Great finds all, and I appreciate the details. Good to see some "S" coins making their way east. 😀 I'll have to look but it I think I dug an S penny yesterday. Still gotta get me one of those Barbers, tho. 🤔
    3 points
  25. Agreed Steve and I don't know why there is so much confusion with people feeling the 6000 is an outright 7k beater or replacement. 🧐 When I swing the 7000 I know that I’m walking over easy gold, I also know I’m most certainly going to pass up on the odd decent gold mass that is just too fast a time-constant for the 7000. Conversely when I swing the 6000 I know that I’m passing up on the solid pieces from a few grams and up, even though the 6000 can do well on deeper pieces it requires a lot more effort to chase this sort of gold so I just focus on what it does really well and then cross back to the 7000 when required. JP
    3 points
  26. Be careful, Wink is hydrofluoric acid😳
    3 points
  27. So you were the metal detecting equivalent of Soler or Rosario, eh? I used to collect baseball cards and one of the reasons I stopped was b/c the team I collected for (Braves) were probably the most in-demand cards after the Yankees and Red Sox. So you might have a chance to sell that hat for a profit! Great finds by the way!
    3 points
  28. 3 points
  29. Why promote fraud? I’ll scrub the links later today, as I see no reason to boost their Google results and send business their way. I don’t mind people posting about scams, but please don’t link to them and thereby help them. We have spammers for that. Edit - ok, think I got the 20 plus links scrubbed. Honestly, I’m surprised Mitchel. The minute you see LRL (long range locator) you should know that anything else said is not worth paying a minutes attention to. They advertise alongside legitimate stuff hoping the legitimacy will rub off. And Germans are no less subject to scams and fraud than anyone else. I’ve got no problem with people selling dowsing gear, as it’s honest about what it is. LRL is just dowsing dressed up with pseudo science and a price tag to match. It’s the deception employed about what these devices really are that crosses the line with me. If you want a dowsing device, just make one. Attach as many dials and meters as will make you happy. The knobs and dials don’t have to actually work, well, because they don’t actually do anything! Just be sure it looks really cool.
    3 points
  30. Rumour was it is Nokta preventing it. I can't find the post where I read it, Monty I believe did the post?
    2 points
  31. Here is another ring (size 13 1/4 also) that I found earlier this year. This one is just a bit thicker. I had a friend that suggested a napkin ring before I posted here and I am not ruling that out but from the ones I googled, I don't think so and even though I have found some STRANGE things on the beach, who would have silver napkin rings on a beach? But you never know!!!
    2 points
  32. Another (less painful but still annoying) metal detecting downside to searching under walnut trees this time of year is that when on the ground the fruit interferes with smoothly moving the coil during the swing. On a couple occassions I spent several minutes picking them up and piling them away from my detecting area (easier on the squirrels, too...). Speaking of squirrels, I've had them re-dig my filled-in holes when I've detected near walnut trees. I don't know exactly why but I can think of multiple reasons. Worst result is who gets blamed for the pot-marked landsacpe; hint: it's not the squirrel. You've done well with relics/artifacts in that old site, buttons in particular. I'm still steamed that some detectorists beat you to it by cheating (i.e. without permission). But steam doesn't find new targets so I remind myself to do what is within my control and forget the rest.
    2 points
  33. High asking prices don't bother me. Ignorance bothers me. But then again, this just goes to show how effective Garrett's marketing strategy has been...
    2 points
  34. Went out yesterday and today grid searching the racetrack area and the old farmhouse. Yesterday I didn't find much, a couple of old wheats and a pistol ball, a pocket watch adjusting weight and a very small button, what may have been on a shirt or shoe. I let the person that was shooting know that I was going to leave a flag out when I am out on the field near the gate. This morning I went out again, another blustery fall day. Didn't think I'd find much more but boy was I wrong. Today I hunted an area behind where the farmhouse was, there were two sheds as well. All is gone but the well now, luckily they filled it in because it can't be seen. The area is only about an acre. About halfway through the day I noticed I was already down a third on the Equinox battery, so I flew back to the house and grabbed my PD battery pack because I started finding coins and wanted to finish the field. I bungeed it to the shaft. It doesn't weigh that much so while the detector is charging I can drive on. It will charge the machine fully at least twice. It was a great day. Got an 1897 IHP, a 1908 V Nickel, 3 old wheats (1917,1919,1920), another old button, an iron hunting overall button marked "SWEET ORR", a musket ball and an adjustment tool of some kind not shown. The tiny thing at the bottom was the big find of the day, 1/3-ish of an 1852 Trime. It's difficult enough to find a Trime, but at least I got the good part! It appears to have either been clipped or broken, I could not find any of the other pieces.
    2 points
  35. Thanks for starting a good thread Rob. Nice piece of gold you got there.
    2 points
  36. Yes I know they are hard to find because of their size to begin with, and that is why I was wondering how you found such a small piece of it. They trimes I have found has been almost 10 to 12 inches deep with the sense at 20 on my 800. You did a great job finding it and that is what counts.
    2 points
  37. Use the machines that bring you the most enjoyment. I see all the new ones on the horizon and still check the weather and if it looks half descent out I'll take my Tesoro over the others. It may not be the fastest nor the deepest but that simple beep and making me think whats below puts a smile on my face.
    2 points
  38. 1895, getting in striking range of those seated's 🙂
    2 points
  39. Nice 3 ring Tom!, One day I would like to find a few!! 👍👍
    2 points
  40. Well, been looking for a 9.5"d.d. coil for my 2.68 Simplex. All I hear is I have to upgrade to be able to use the 8.5 or 9.5 by nokta.Well ,guess what found a new 9.5"x 5" d.d. by NEL for my simplex and its perfect🙂 The F-70 does great with my three coils the 11"x7" ; 9.5",5'' shooter mostly use the smaller coils and planning on keeping it for a while.All this new detector technology is not for me at 80 years of age.Saw a super so call 1266x which was use by nasa its $1200.00 and they make it sound like it can pull chinese up by their gold teeth its at flea-Bay.Check it out.
    2 points
  41. Simultaneous multifrequency shines best in saltwater environments, but there are some benefits to using it in mild ground. This is all theoretical, often nuanced, and at times depends on other factors. One is a more stable and reliable target ID and often to a greater depth. Depth in itself is a little trickier. Theoretically you should see a more consistent depth across the range of conductors, whereas single frequency tends to hit harder on conductors it’s particular frequency is tuned to and there tends to be a fall off in depth as you move away from that conductivity. If I were using an XLT at 6.5khz it should hit harder on Silver and depth would fall off on gold. This is one reason single frequency detectors began moving more in the 10-14khz range. Though theoretically this range hits hardest on mid conductors, it strikes a better balance in sensitivity across the spectrum. In my ground and in my freshwater swimming holes my 12khz Simplex would do just fine though if I didn’t have multifrequency options. The differences often seem subtle.
    2 points
  42. Magic, collectable, you name it! It's whatever the market will bare, and how bad someone wants it! Ebay is a perfect example! People get caught up in a bidding war in the last minute or two of a sale ending, and before you know it, it "wins" for way over price!😬👍👍
    2 points
  43. Thanks! The dog & truck came out of a sand volleyball court. There's a metal spring inside the dog and some screws that made it ID at 24. The marks on the "nugget" ring are MM 6_9_9 and a tiny mark that I can't make out.
    2 points
  44. Auto 1/Normal/Threshold on are my to go settings for the monos. At times when the EMI is bad (mostly weather, wind type EMI) I go to Manual and dial back in gain, in particular with the 17. In NNV, manual/high gain I only do in very dry conditions and in particular with no wind related EMI. As Steve said, low gain will almost loose nothing for shallow gold but will take a hit in depth (at least in my experience). The normal/difficult change (if needed) is mostly for improved ground response IMO, not so much for EMI. Saturated wet NNV ground requires the 14 DD in salt mode (RP area), although some people still run the monos there regardless. Strict coil control and slow swing speed is a must under all conditions. Using the monos/high gain in salt-rich NNV grounds after heavy rain leads to "salt howling", regardless of how slow you are swinging. Use that if you don't mind getting insane or already are. GC.
    2 points
  45. Nevada is a big place, my settings vary by location, not by state. I tend to bounce between manual 10 or Auto+ depending on location and conditions (ground wet or dry). That may be hotter than I’d recommend people newer to detecting should run however. I’m used to running “noisy” whereas most people benefit from the stability gained by less aggressive settings. I can say there is not a lot of range in the 6000 sensitivity control, and running even at manual 1 still retains a surprising amount of punch.
    2 points
  46. Look at what people are asking for Tesoro's. Like they are some magical devices. Get a Simplex for less. And if you like beep and dig don't look down.
    2 points
  47. Trimes are hard enough to find. Finding 1/3 of one is pretty impressive! If that was my luck I would have one of the 3rds without the date 🙂
    2 points
  48. There is a lot more to detectors than frequency. Use what you like and that gets the job done for you. There are plenty of Garrett Ace owners out there doing just fine. Hours and good locations, that’s the ticket to success.
    2 points
  49. Found a really large hat😉
    2 points
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