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  1. I am very fortunate to have made JPs acquaintance years ago on Finders Forum when I was trying to learn more about my new sd2200d. Those were great times on a great forum, everyone friendly and sharing. JP is a literal gold mine of deep Minelab knowledge, with personal ties to Bruce Candy. We got to know each other a little over the net, and then I was fortunate enough to be invited to Oz to spend a month of time detecting with JP and Chris Ralph. I have never had a better host in my life than Jonathan Porter. He is like this crazy camp host who insists on cooking and who selflessly shared his locations and gold with me for a solid month. It was one of the best times of my entire life. The Aussie forums went downhill and became combative. To my dismay I found myself acting like an asshole in response. This forum was set up as a direct response to my experience watching forums self destruct. I wanted this place to be like the old Finders Forum. By and large I’ve achieved that goal over the last few years. But a problem developed. As this forum has become the place to be for information, it is attracting some people who have history of some sort with JP. A lot of it seems to be tall poppy syndrome. Other stuff is more real and personal. Maybe some of you have legit beefs with JP. Here is the deal. I don’t care what those issues are. Jonathan Porter is my friend. I’ve learned a lot from him. I’d like to learn more. I know of nobody outside Bruce who has deeper knowledge about current Minelab product, and JP is a truly superb detectorist to boot. People dogging JP is at cross purposes to the forum as far as I am concerned. I think there are quite a few people here who would like to hear more from JP without him having to swat files and getting grumpy in the process. Long ago I promised him a refuge here, and I have failed in that by trying to accommodate everyone. But I guess the time has come to declare allegiances, and I choose still to stand with JP. If anyone has a problem with that it is simple. There are a dozen forums you can go to instead where you can spend all your time talking about JP and me and the multiple ways in which we are horrible people. I’m really fine with that. Those who wish to stay are also very welcome, but from now on keep in mind that having a go at JP is the same as having a go at me. And my patience after four years has hit rock bottom. We have a new detector on the way, and lots of exciting stuff to talk about. If you want to share information and have fun, stay. Anything else, please leave. If it is just ten of us here I can handle that. I don’t need this forum or website, and it either gets back on track or I will continue to take action until it does. This is not about products, this is about personalities and who gets along with who. I think JP deserves one place on the internet where he is truly welcome by all, and anyone that gets in the way of that here will eventually be rooted out. Thanks and good night! Steve’s Australia Adventure
    69 points
  2. About 80 hours of detecting in Alaska with the GPX 6000 and Garrett 24K, gold cleaned by shaking in water with soap. 1.86 Troy ounces total, much of it found by using my "scrape and detect" methodology. Garrett Goldmaster 24K at work
    55 points
  3. Had a great trip on business, visiting family, and some remote prospecting. Got a couple ounces of chunky stuff with Minelab 6000 and Garrett 24K. Weather a bit cool and wet, but otherwise all went well. Thank you Hugh for watching over things. It got easier I suppose after the site went down! That I never considered as a real possibility as it’s only happened a few times in eight years. Oh well, back up again now. I’m back on the job here again daily, but will be a bit scarce on posts as I have quite a bit going on this fall. But when needed, I’ll be there. I hope you’ve all got good things going on in your respective worlds, and thanks for making the forum what it is.
    52 points
  4. Day one... I headed to the hills this morning to beat the heat and log a few hours behind the control pod of Minelabs' latest offering, the exciting new GPX 6000. Hiking up and down the hills with this featherweight P.I. nugget detector is pure bliss after lugging the GPZ 7000 around for the past 6 years...has it been so long?! Armed with the 11-inch GPX mono coil, I targeted an old nugget patch that I had carefully gridded many times in the past with several detectors, including the GPX-5000, Gold Monster and GPZ 7000. With nearby power lines, operating at a Manual Sensitivity of 10 or Auto+ proved a bit too chattery and required excessive Noise Cancel delays that became rather irksome after awhile. Backing the Sensitivity to 7 smoothed things out considerably without any noticeable loss of performance, and if I got an iffy target response, a quick jump to 10 would provide a definitive yes or no. After digging a few trash targets, the first “nugget” that the GPX 6000 hit was a 0.04 of a gram surface screamer, and the next couple of nuggets were small and shallow; nothing surprising. But how did the Gold Monster miss these? Must not have got that little 5-inch Monster coil directly over them.🤔 It was the next 3 targets that really blew my mind, however... By late afternoon, the temps were soaring into the mid-90's, and despite a nice breeze, it was becoming a tad uncomfortable, and I was thinking about calling it a day. That was when the GPX 6000 sounded off with a sweet, mellow and deep sounding target response. A few scrapes with the pick exposed the underlying bedrock, and somewhere - in a crevice, no doubt - a golden treasure awaited to be uncovered...or so I hoped...could just as easily be a bit of square nail, a bullet or boot tack.😒 Blasting a few inches into the bedrock with the pick got the target out - a nice little golden picker in the scoop. 🙂 After backfilling the dig hole, just one swing of the detector revealed another soft, mellow hit a mere foot away. Same scenario: a small golden goody a few inches deep in a bedrock crevice. Then, about another 4 feet away, a faint response. Quickly jacking the Sensitivity from 7 to 10 brightened the signal a bit, so I began digging about 6 inches through a layer of gravels before hitting bedrock and a rather thick tree root. A little more pick work and pinpointing with the edge of the coil located the target in a crevice right next to the root. This one was deep; nearing the 12-inch mark, the target was finally out, and it was screaming off of the coil edge! A quick sift with the scoop uncovered a hefty 1.34 gram nugget. How the GPZ 7000 missed this beauty, I'll never know...it's a head scratcher.😅 Time to call it quits for the day on that high note, for sure! I'll be at it again tomorrow, this time with the GPX 14 DD coil in EMI Cancel Mode; should be able to run flat out in Auto+ Sensitivity with the threshold as smooth as glass.
    50 points
  5. I go to extreme lengths to bring information on new detectors to this website. Many others help. Trademarks are watched, patents, corporate reports, leaks from overseas dealers.... anything that can be found that offers hints to upcoming product. It is a large driver here as many are interested in the latest and greatest. Many experts here add valuable commentary. The volume of information here can get overwhelming when we are on a roll. I try to bury people with early info. As a result, this is the place to be if you like information. Those that only visit the forum, you are missing out on years of effort put into other parts of this website, and you really should look at those other areas. I've never written a book on this stuff per se, but if I did, most of it would be repeating what comes out here a post at a time. I am also a stickler for accurate information. I'm very well plugged into most things metal detecting, and when I see somebody crossing lines with inaccurate information, I take care of it. Not to brag, but after 45 years of doing this every day, the depth and breadth of my knowledge on various brands is rather encyclopedic. I do not want to create fake machine info as is done on other websites just to attract clicks. It either passes my accuracy filter, or I delete it. You can trust what you see on this site as having a very high degree of accuracy, and there are smart people here to call it out if it is not. And then people show up and talk hype. They literally come here to partake of all this information, and then turn right around and call it hype. I guess it is the sheer volume of information and the enthusiasm they see as hype. Some get caught up in it, and make poor decisions. Then they want to blame their poor decisions on hype. I'm calling B.S. This website by and large is for serious adults, not children. I have no time to waste with people who cannot take responsibility for their own actions, and want to throw the hype card out as a cover for their poor decision making abilities. I LOVE INFORMATION and I collect and pour it out here. I AM PASSIONATE ABOUT THE SUBJECT MATTER. I am basically a big kid, these are my toys, and I get all giddy when I get new toys. I've lived for this stuff since I was 14 and I'm 63 now... you sure as heck are not going to change me at this point. If you don't like all that, if it's all hype to you, you are in the wrong place. I'm not sure what you are looking for. A placid site with no information to trigger that credit card reflex? Heck if I know. What I can tell you is I work hard, very hard, for all of you by working hard for me. I gather information and learn things FOR ME, but I am also very happy to share what I know WITH YOU. If you want, and I assume up front that by being here that is what you want. Given the effort I am making, the easiest way to get on my bad side is to bring up the hype thing. If all this information and enthusiastic forum membership is too much for you to handle, just go away. I cannot understand why people watch the website, see all the info, join, and then bitch about the basic nature of what we are doing here. I have watched for years as the best people, the ones who really know what they are talking about, tire of this nonsense and disappear. You don't think we need that crap, do you? It is the craziest shoot yourself in the foot thing I have ever seen. I envisioned this as a place where those people could come and share what they know, to the benefit of all. But in trying to please everyone I lost sight of that mission. No more. That's my rant. We have a new machine into that I am very excited about. There are world class experts here ready to discuss the machine and have fun with a rare gift - a new gold getting beast. If that's not your thing, you do not want to have fun with all that, please take the debbie downer stuff somewhere else. I'm not trying to make everyone happy, I'm not everyone's cup of tea, and I'm extremely cool with that. I'm trying to collect my tribe here, the people that get it, and want to be part of it. I really hope that is you, but if not, there are zillions of places that may better suit. I set this website up expressly because I wanted a place to play with my friends, and I never put a gun to anyone's head to be here. If you are one of those that like to play the hype card, know that I set this place up to get away from you!! One of the very best things about getting older is being able to let my "grumpy Steve" out to play if I want.
    45 points
  6. Almost done this season but may get in a few more hunts. My 3rd and best season detecting for gold. Gold is from Montana and Idaho from 5 different locations. Total count was 436 pieces, 119 with the SDC and 317 with the Monster. SDC got the 3 big ones and also the bulk of the total weight. Big nugget weighed 3.55ozt, then 25+gram, and 12 gram (3 nugget pic). SDC also found me my 1st "pocket" where I'd had a 20 piece day with 14 coming out of a 6" wide x 8" deep hole...THAT was FUN!!! Total weight (so far) is 7.66ozt. Nuggets came from public, private and permission ground. The Monster still amazes me and the addition of the SDC really helped make this season by far my best. Thanks to everybody on the forum for all the info/stories etc. and to Steve for hosting and maintaining the site!!!!
    45 points
  7. I packed up the girlfriend, 5th wheel, RZR and 2 GoldenDoodles and GPZ 7000 for a long weekend of detecting with another Forum member. We've been exploring a gold area off the beaten path for several weeks, finding the odd sub-gram pieces here and there. The area has very little placer history, mostly load gold from back in the 30's. After studying the maps we were determined to keep pushing west, hitting as many little feeder gulches as possible hoping to find a hot spot. Day 1: I found 2 small pieces after a lot of walking. Fellow Forum member found nothing but skunk. Day 2: We decided to abandon our original plan and go back to an area near an old lode gold mine. I found the skunk, friend found 2 pieces for about 1 gram total. Day 3: Back to the plan, keep pushing west through a series of small gullies. I hit an area of shallow bedrock for 6 small nuggets. I get back to the RZR and my friend has that grin and tells me he thinks he found an area worth exploring. He then pops a 3/4 oz nugget in my hand. He says "oh, I also found these in the same area, 5.5 grams of chunky nuggets. Like a lot of fellow prospectors, I'm just as happy when someone, anyone finds some decent gold on a joint excursion. Sweet, what a day. He points out the landmarks and gives me a general description of the area because he has to return home to grade college exams. Day 4: I head back out to the area he described. I spent close to 2 hrs scouting and had about given up finding the zone he described when I saw a fresh dig. I worked up the gully and saw several more fresh digs, being that we are the only prospectors within 50 miles, I start the search in earnest. I'm confident he has covered the gully, so I start detecting the flanks and hillside. I immediately find the 2 small pieces in the photo. Small in this context is relative to the big nugget next to them, they are by no means small considering my past month of detecting finds. I expanded out from there and get a faint whisper of a target in the flats between 2 gullies. I dig for a solid 20 minutes in hardpacked gravel and caliche. I had to summon a couple friends nearby to come help. We took turns digging, making sure not to hit the nugget. We busted out 2 big rocks cemented in the caliche and finally the target was screaming at sensitivity of 1. Down to a dental pick and a pinpointer to pick around in the caliche and not damage the nugget. Probably close to 45 minutes and a hole about 2ft wide and 18 inches down before Eureka. There she is. Days/weekends like this are pretty rare these days. We need one every now and then to keep the fire going and keep pushing that coil.
    44 points
  8. With the fantastic weather in the Rye Patch region during the month of October, I was chomping at the bit to get down there, but my summer job didn't end until the 30th. It still took me a few days afterward to get everything wrapped up, so I finally hit the road and met up with Gerry and friends at Rye Patch the following Tuesday. The detector training class we were scheduled to give that weekend ended up being cancelled, thanks to a winter storm that was forecast to move into the area on Friday. Needless to say, having only two days of optimal detecting conditions before being snowed out and forced to move on to Arizona was a total bummer.😞 Intent on finding a few bits of gold in-spite of the looming storm system and armed with our trusty Minelab GPZ 7000 gold detectors (and one SDC 2300 - also quite trusty, btw), we hit an old patch in hopes of digging up some previously overlooked yellow metal. Only two small nuggets were found after a couple of hours searching with four coils on the ground - not a very good start. It was then that I remembered another old patch nearby that I had completely forgotten about, it had been so long since I had been there. It wasn't a very good producer back in the day, but perhaps we would be able to find a few nuggets that the VLF and early PI machines may have left behind. Within minutes of hitting the ground, my good friend Chef Rusty and I both popped a shallow sub-gram nugget; not a bad start. Soon, everyone was digging good gold! My second target gave an obvious yet deep sounding signal response from the GPZ's stock 14” coil. I imagined it to be a three or four gram piece at a depth of 12” to 18”. Gerry noticed me digging quite an excavation and came over to capture the action on video. At a measured depth of 20”, the target was finally out of the hole, and as I held it aloft there was an audible gasp from the audience that had gathered to watch, followed by cheers and fist-bumps: After a thorough cleaning, the specimen weighed in at a whopping 40 grams - a totally unexpected and pleasant surprise! The nuggets kept biting sporadically for everyone the rest of the day, and the same was repeated the following day. Just goes to show that sometimes the ZVT tech can really ignite an old burned-out nugget patch. Much fun was had by all, and it really made up for such a short two-day detecting trip. Pictured below are my finds, including the 40 gram chunk, a couple nuggets at over 8 grams, and all the small bits, with a total combined weight of over 66 grams.
    44 points
  9. I also am back from Alaska, although its from a different part of the state than Steve was in. I am back from Gold King Creek, about 50 miles south of Fairbanks. It was quite an adventure. They run an operation for tourists as well as running a regular commercial scale operation at the same time. I did metal detecting and shoveled gravel into a highbanker. Shoveling gravel is taxing and with my back still only at about 90% from my car accident, after a couple weeks of shoveling all day my back was in sore shape. I balanced off shoveling by metal detecting. I found 179 pieces of gold while I was there, but the total weight for all my detected gold was only 5.2 grams. The gold from Gold King is small (as is common for many Alaska placers). Now don't get me wrong, I had a ball detecting all of those 179 pieces, and there are a few rare larger bits in the area. One lady found a nugget of about 3.5 grams before we arrived with an SDC 2300 - very unusual. I think the biggest the commercial operator got while I was there was about a gram, and that is from 65 ounces he produced in the two weeks I was there. My biggest was about 0.2 grams, and average for the 179 pieces was about 0.03 grams. That's a testimony to the sensitivity of the GM 1000. I did get some good gold by shoveling into the highbanker also. The gold does not occur on a real bedrock but on a hardpan of deep clay, real bed rock is 180 feet down and likely has no significant gold ( based on where the gold is coming from). Overall, I think it was a big success, I really enjoyed myself, the folks who went in with me had a great time, and I got to meet a lot of new folks, including some of the staff who were avid detector prospectors from Arizona. On trying to depart, I got stuck there for a day by low fog - which prevents planes from flying in. Very normal for an Alaskan prospecting adventure. I've now taken care of the things I need to do for the ICMJ magazine and am getting back on track to take care of all the other things that go with life here in the lower 48. There will be an article in the ICMJ on it with a lot more detail for those who subscribe, and I have a video about working on hardpan or false bedrock on my Youtube channel.
    43 points
  10. Just a FYI for people that I am taking an extended break for a long trip home to Alaska. Like many I was cooped up the entire last year, had things I wanted get derailed, and then a giant pile of stuff came up in the last few months. I've obviously been edgy and erratic in posting, and so I need to step away for a bit. Where I am going I really have no choice, and that is good. Chase Goldman is a very active participant who posts mostly on the coin and relic forums. He has graciously offered to help keep spammers at bay. Other than that, you all are great folks, I'm sure the forum will be fine. Might even take a turn for the better in my absence, so it will be interesting to see how it goes, and where you all take it. I'll still be around a for awhile, but will stay in the background, as I have to get everything totally dialed before I depart. You all have a great summer, get lots of gold.... see you later! Steve H P.S. thanks again Chase for helping enable my absence with no worries - sending good finds karma your way!!
    42 points
  11. Just back from our first prospecting trip after taking early retirement and moving to Kambalda in Western Australia . Did really well for a 5 week trip with 216 pieces for 376 grams. Biggest pieces 10, 11.5, 27 and 155 grams. No more working for the man ! Cheers, Rick https://youtu.be/jvZ3RyTN0Mo https://youtu.be/hvygdhqU_uQ https://youtu.be/yWINJjZdhp4 https://youtu.be/MODRP3GihW8
    41 points
  12. Drove down Monday and met up with Chet; we wanted to try out our new 6000s on some hammered patches, just to make sure I wouldn’t have “Buyer’s Remorse” after trading in my 7000. I got there about noon, and Chet had been out hunting in the morning. He had marked two targets in the ground so I could hear them too when I got there. One was in a scrape and the other a bit outside....hmmm? Likely iron crap in this pounded area we thought. Dug them out, and he had just found his first 2 gpx6000 nuggets...beautiful character, with some intricate folds. I ended up with one that afternoon. Even though the 6000 is light with great ergonomics, my detecting arm is out of shape and my bicep was getting a bit sore. I found myself missing my bungee, hip stick, and guide arm on my 7000 setup. I also missed the clip on wireless speaker. I was using the Aventree Torus headphones that hang around your neck; they fell off a few times while digging, then when I tried to secure them, the Power button would get pressed and they would turn off. Chet’s just stopped working. Weird. So need to figure out my speaker system. One other 7000 feature I also miss is the built-in gps...so handy. So day 2 we hit several other old patches. I used a bungee and was getting more in tune with the 6000...much more comfortable with it, though my left arm didn’t know what to do! Put hand in pocket? Hook thumb on harness loop? Its motor memory wanted to be helping with a guide arm😄! By the end of 8 hours we each had found a bit more gold. Nice, but nothing over .2 or .3 gram. On the 3rd day we went back to Day 1 patch, as it was close to camp. Again, the 6000 was able to sniff out some good stuff from this patch that had been hunted by 5000s, 2300s, 7000s. By now I was in sync with my new detector. I mainly hunted in Normal, setting at 3 o’clock position with threshold. Tried the Auto+ but preferred the other, I like hearing the threshold and it was more sensitive to targets. We knew the machine was awesome at finding these smaller nuggets, and weird shaped nuggets, but we hadn’t found anything of any size yet. That changed when Chet found a gorgeous 2.5-3 grammer at about 6”! Woo Hoo!👍 So Chet was the big winner on this trip; 6.2 grams in 3 days. And they will be beautiful when cleaned up...maybe add those pics to this post Chet? I ended up with 2.4 g in 2 1/2 days. Chet attributes a lot of his success on this trip to the ease of detecting with the 6000, compared to the 7000...fewer rest breaks means more time on the gold fields. Though I really loved my 7000, I think this detector will better serve me; either hunting known worked patches or walking miles looking for new, it will do the job and be easier on my neck and shoulders/arm.
    40 points
  13. Hey Guys, Yes, that is correct, I believe I have found my smallest one ouncer to date. I'm referring to the size overall of the 1 ounce nugget. Most of my 1 ounce nuggets or larger are flat and much large in size. This slug, it solid and dense and weights 20.4 Dwt's, just .4 Dwt's over an ounce (20 Dwt's per Troy Ounce). I'm not going to discuss how deep it was found, or signal response - It was found with a Minelab GPZ 7000 and it was deep! Wishing you all many gold nuggets. Rob
    40 points
  14. We had a 3 party hunt scheduled Condor, LuckyLarry and myself. I set sail East Bound and down on I-80 to Rye Patch from Reno. I texted the Boyz and received a text back from Condor that his Truck was sick and couldn’t make this trip! Well just meant more Rib Eyes on my dinner plate! LuckyLarry, was on his way from Elko to Rye Patch and the timing was perfect he followed me in to our camp site! Temperature Gauge was a solid 97 at the 3 O’Clock hour. Larry, hunted out here in the Hey Days of Rye Patch. He was just learning Gold Detecting back then and scored many nice nuggets! But, ended up being a Top Notch Relic Hunter. That’s how we met. We met on the Internet with me needing some old Relic’s ID. He was my go to guy to tell me the history of anything I’d dig up in the Goldfields of California. Of course, I avoided these extra trashy old camp sites and would pass the location to Larry for his Relic hunts when he traveled to California. We set up camp and hopped into my RZR Buggy into the heat to swing our 6000’s on my old patches. Finding left over nuggets that our older models missed, but the heat! Had to hit a 100 before some clouds moved in to cool things down! Them clouds had rain and in front of them was the wind. Headed back to Camp to beat the rain, as I left my Trucks Windows half open which was the way the wind and rain was blowing in. Made it back to camp wet Windows up with a gust of wind that had to be over 50 mph. Well early to bed with showers on and off and the next morning with more rain to heavy to detect in which gave us time to eat some cookies and for me to remember where some more old patches where at to swing on. Gone for 4-Days with 2 1/2 days of good detecting! We ended up with 20 Dinks each! Two Lucky 🍀 guys with plenty of smiles for our efforts fighting Mother Natures last blasts of Summer! I figure I’m now about 80% done with having the 6000 over our old patches in Rye Patch. I’m sure we left gold in the patches we hunted for further visits…never can get them all and every day is a different day! Until the next Hunt! LuckyLundy
    39 points
  15. Norvic asked why I was so proud of a VLF when I own and have posted much success with the other higher end detectors. It was my post on rating the higher end Minelabs....so here goes. There are many factors to my craze and style of detecting, but my finds are the facts and not many people can compare, unless they too use the tools (detector) and hunt the style I do. I consider myself a gold hawg or gold pig. I chase it all in terrains flat or tall. Terrain - I live in the Northwestern state of Idaho and much of my detecting in the surround state of ID., is Oregon, Nevada and occasional Montana. For the most part, OR, MT and ID are pretty much the same with steep terrain mountainous rough country. A day of electronic prosecting and hiking in such states, is much harder on the body for a guy my age, heck it’s harder for anyone. Going to Arizona, Rye Patch and other Northern Nevada high desert areas is a treat for my body in more ways than one. Maybe that is why so many people detect there? It’s easy to drive and get to without walking…boy are most of us lazy? YES, including me at times, but not in my home state (backyard where I play). The ID, OR, MT mountains have steep ravines/canyons and the water is at the lowest point. Here is the many miles of hand placer workings, dredge tailing and hardrock mining ore dump piles. The gold I am chasing is the stuff the old timers missed. Pic below - This huge ore dump pile produced a few thousand dollars in Specimens. This is the not so steep side and we had to tie off with ropes on the other side. Half the targets would roll down the hill and need to be found during a break when we were at the bottom. The PI's can't see this time of gold. Trash - Trash is my treasure in a way.. as I know the site has not been hunted as hard. Trash is what most detectorists hate, and I too get that way on occasion, but I know if I'm patient, I'll eventually be rewarded. A big factor I run into is 100 to 150 yr old man made trash from the early prospectors. They left much of it on the hill, in the placer digs and tailing piles. Many of the small mining camps were right on or near their diggings and they just tossed the old food cans, tobacco/coffee tins and worn out leather boots with hundreds of nails and broken, picks/ax heads shovels aside. Pic below- In old tailing piles a lighter, faster, better ID detector is best. He who digs the most non ferrous targets in a day, get to smile all the way home. Pic below- is the 1 pound specimen after cleanup. Tools – Know your detector, its limitations, strong and weak points. Bigger deeper detector is great in flat terrain and areas with limited trash. Raw depth and power is amazing to have, when the target you dig a foot or so deep is not a sardine can. How about a shovel head at 2 feet or more? Think about it and what you do when digging 5 or 6 of those an hour with your big deep penetrating detector. What does your body have left in the tank? My lighter VLF is easier to swing in rough terrain, has better Iron and Target ID, is not as deep or powerful in trashy sites. It saves me time from digging unknown iron targets, it saves me energy from digging deep holes, it saves me energy from having to pack around a bigger bulky detector. The proper detector for the site is a must and in many cases my lighter, faster, better target Identification, sub $1000 investment is the right tool. Pic below - This golden oreo was recovered in old hand placer workings with my VLF. Having what I consider the best identification VLF gold detector on the market saves me time. Pic below - It was recovered at 16" with Minelab EQ-15" coil. Yes I'll be going back over this area with the new CoilTek NOX 15" round as it is even deeper. Gold Knowledge- This is confusing to so many people as they think gold is gold. Yes I too used to think the same way. Luckily I hunt a variety of gold producing locations and sites I like to detect and learn from. My many years of comparing/testing detectors at such sites has given my staff and I an understanding of gold, its characters, density and how the elusive Au responds to the varying detector models from the different manufactures. Many of the nugget photos being shared on social media in years past were dense solid gold pieces and they are beauties. That’s what the detector could easily respond to. In more recent years, the sizes of the nuggets became smaller and we started reading about and seeing some nice specimens. The newer GPX detectors with their advanced tuning and soil timings (Fine Gold) would outperform their older brothers (SD/GP’s) on smaller and courser gold, so when get to make more of those finds and share them. Most recent years has us using SDC-2300 and GPZ-7000’s. Again, the gold gets smaller and the amount of crystalline gold, wire gold, salt/pepper specimens are being unearthed with these detectors supersedes that of their older brothers the GPX series. Pic below - This softball sized specimen was found with a VLF and has multi ounces of gold. VLF picks it up deeper than many bigger detectors. Pic below - This beautiful 3" long quartz and gold specimen came from a trashy ore dump pile with a VLF. Pic blow- These quartz cocoon wire gold specimens bring a premium and come out of hard rock ore dump piles. Pic Below - The PI's don't see these rare pieces, the 7000 barley does on a select few. Pic below - I have a feeling the extra sensitivity of the new GPX-6000 will do even better. Proof – The facts are in the vault at the bank. I own beautiful specimens pieces recovered with detectors and have tested many on a variety of detectors. I have gold finds that are multi ounce pieces and they contain 2 or 3 ounces of gold in them, but for some reason an SD or GP don’t see them, even less than an inch. I also have such pieces my GPX 5000 does not see, but my GPZ-7000 does. What is most amazing, is I have pieces of gold with multi ounces of metal and even the ZED has issues or can barely respond an inch or two away. If this is the case, then why do I have these find gold pieces of art? I’ve taken the time to test and learn my detector tools and have found a certain trusty VLF sees them all, can ID them all, is lighter in weight and so I get to hunt longer, saves me energy since I don’t dig as deep for unwanted targets. Pic below - This specimen came from dredge tailing and the speckled pieces like this get missed by most PI's. Pic below- Over $800 in gold in this 3 ounce specimen and my VLF does better than my GPX-5000 and my SDC-2300. The SDC goes deeper than the GPX. You better know your gold and your detectors capabilities or lack of. Pic below - This 3 ounce specimen was found in trashy hand workings. I actually had a GPZ-7000 here for a couple hours and gave up because of the amount of item trash. A GPX-5000 with DD coil run with DISC mode would be better than my GPZ, but then again my NOX does even better. Better target identification of my NOX, is most important at the site this 3+ oz'er came from. GPX-6000 – A new tool and one that has Gerry very very excited. Now we are about to get a revolution of Geo Sensing Technology with PI power and capabilities for a wider variety of gold textures, densities, characters and sizes. Minelab (and their track record) is even telling us some of such capabilities and so I and a few of the guys who do not like to miss gold, are getting ourselves prepared, getting our old sites, lined up and making sure we are going to take advantage of the stragglers. Remember when the SDC-2300 and GPZ-7000 came out and all the slow response from the majority. You folks missed the opportunity of a lot of gold. My guys and I were killing it in NV and AZ on those so called worked out sites. Was it a gamble to spend that kind of money? If that’s what you love/enjoy and if you have a good track record with Minelab, it’s bet I’ll take most every time. I don’t lose detector bets very often. Pic below- This stunning collectible specimen was found by my brother with his SDC-2300. It came from a place he had previous hunted and found gold with his GPX-5000. The 5000 does not even whisper on it. Minelab claims the GPX-6000 is more sensitive than the SDC-2300 & GPZ-7000. I can't wait to use the GPX-6000 at the site and many others. Hopefully this story and the pics I shared will help educate some of you on how the different detector technologies produce more gold. I realize it's hard to put down your old reliable detector as it has probably and hopefully served you well. If your sites are getting thin of targets and or gold, just maybe a new detector can put the smile back on your face? I'll go back to this simple statement I have said below in other posts and it is the absolute truth. You can't find what your detector don't see. PS - I’ll be honest though, for me it’s the lighter weight, better ergonomics, not being tethered in a harness and User Friendly that has me sold. The extra gold my new GPX-6000 is going to find, is a bonus. PPS – I’m just as eager to test the GPX-6000 with some of my gold and see how much better/worse it does than my GPX, SDC and GPZ. (I'm educating myself). PPPS – I still feel there will be a place for my VLF, as it’s lighter, and have better target ID. See you in the gold field, where the most knowledge is learned. Or speed it up with our 3 days Field Training at www.gerrysdetectors.com Happy Hunting. Gerry
    39 points
  16. Just got back from 8+ days in the high desert....the weather was perfect and the quiet, wide open spaces were soul rejuvenating. Met up with Chet and Brian....we were working on a skunk our first day when Lucky Lundy texted Brian, so we went and joined him on a hunt. And true to his name, his luck rubbed off on all of us...by late afternoon we all had some gold. By the next day, Rick and I both had Lucky 7s lol.... Unfortunately, his favorite beverage was gone and all I had to offer Lucky Lundy was my homemade lentil soup or organic tofu/veggie stir fry, so he left us for “meatier” digs 😄 Detected new and old spots and I found gold each day....no skunks for me this trip and that’s unusual for sure! Some pieces I swore were going to be bigger by the hole I was digging...I can’t believe what small targets the 7000 can get at some depth! Here’s my largest and smallest nuggets found this trip...a 3 grammer and .06 gram; I only use the 7000 in Nevada and really don’t plan on finding Gold Monster sized gold there, but hey, gold is gold! After being in the dry desert sun and wind all week, I was wishing I could shed my wrinkled outer skin and grow anew like this guy did😆 Saw lots of wild horses, different lizards, and cute horny toads which all add to the experience out there! Had a great time with some great people, and ended up with over 12 grams of Northern Nevada Nuggies!
    39 points
  17. Dang, is it September already? I didn’t even work my little Claim this season! All the easy gold has been gone for a couple years now, and since I’m looking at a Hip Replacement in the near future (old car wreck injury), it wasn’t worth the flare ups that come from hauling rocks, swinging a pick, and shoveling to get at the remaining gold. So I’ve focused on fitness and biking the hills this summer, with a couple fun detecting trips to Nv to keep me in the game….but the next trip isn’t for a couple weeks and I need a Gold Fix! So I decided that after my early morning walk, it would be time to go play with the Gold Monster😊 It was a brisk start to the day! My hummingbird feeder was starting to freeze; most have left, but I leave it out for the stragglers. While on my walk and planning where I’d go with the Monster, I couldn’t help but admire the beautiful sunrise….unfortunately due to the awful California wildfires😥. Then I saw the neighborhood Mama Moose….her Baby was with her, but I didn’t catch the young one in the pic. I sure do love my morning walks up here! Once it warmed up a bit, the Pup and I headed out in the side x side to an area I’ve hit quite a bit before with the Monster, but I was sure it could squeak out a couple more. Lila, of course, wanted to drive😄. I worked real slow, and sure enough, was able to find some little bits. And LITTLE being the key word here…check out this tiny speck. Unbelievable that a detector can pick this up! Here’s one of the larger bits found…can actually pose it on the detector lol! All the while, my little Pup was protecting me from the chipmunks scurrying amongst the Old Timer’s rock piles…what a cutie 🥰 We spent several hours enjoying the late summer sun, the gentle babbling of the nearby creek, the breeze in the pines, and the solitude and contentment only Nature can bring. And I ended up with enough bits to actually weigh…what a great day!👍😊
    38 points
  18. Just the other day, I reached my goal of digging 100 Arizona gold nuggets with the GPZ 7000 this winter. Nothing of much size - the largest weighing in at only 5 grams - but even the tiniest bits are a thrill to find. As usual, I was targeting well known and flogged placer areas, working in and around the old dry-blow diggings. All up, 1.78 ounces troy. It will be interesting to see how much the GPX 6000 increases the number of nuggets found in this size range next season...only time will tell. Good luck out there!
    37 points
  19. What better way to ring in the new year than going nugget shooting in the sunny desert southwest. 😎 In my wanderings through an area heavily worked by the old-time placer miners, I spied an old raked and drywashed nugget patch on a hillside that sloped down to a gravel bench deposit high above the dry creek bed. Back in the VLF gold detector era, the surface rocks were raked away in order to get the detector coil right on the ground, to make up for their limited depth capabilities. Detecting these types of environments with the newer PI and ZVT tech can reveal deeper nuggets that were beyond the reach of VLF detector operators. Slow and methodical coverage of the old patch with the GPZ 7000 yielded two small nuggets for the poke today.
    37 points
  20. I'm out there swinging that coil nearly everyday and finding nothing but crumbs. I got out late this morning in an area that was shown to me about 16 yrs ago by Rob Allison and Bill Southern. I detect that area all the time because it's nearly in my backyard here in Sunny Yuma. This morning I noticed a short gully that was kind of hidden by the rolling hills that I had overlooked all these years. Lots of drywash tailings stacked on a low bench above the gully. I didn't see any obvious dig holes and started working the bench. Not 5 minutes in, I get a decent target signal smack dab in the middle of that bench. After digging through the old tailings, I started hitting virgin hardpack caliche about a foot down. At a sensitivity of 1 on the 7000 with the 15x10 X-Coil, I could just barely pinpoint the nugget without blowing my ears off. I got out the dental pick and started breaking up the caliche so as to not damage the nugget. A good 30 minutes of work and out popped this sweet specie nugget. I'm running High Yield, Normal, Sens 12, Threshold 27. I criss-crossed that bench 4 more times without a target. As a last resort I jacked up the Sensitivity to 20 and turned down the threshold to 21. The threshold at 21 sounds like distant Morse Code blips. In these conditions I listen for the distant blips to blend with a slight hum. I chase a lot of hot rocks and seams of clay, but every now and then it pays off. So I found the small nugget about 20 ft from the bigger one and a solid 12 inches deep. Slowly working my way towards that new GPX6000.
    36 points
  21. Gold is one of natures most interesting and inspiring metals on this earth. I've been fortunate to see, handle and or even find my share of unique pieces but this one takes tops honors. I know there are some legends of gold hunters on here and would ask your help. If anyone has ever found one similar, please let us see. As it stands now, this is a 1 of a kind and I was the lucky one who realized to grab a cell phone and put it on video mode....just in case we found a nice nugget. But what was actually dug up just blew us away. Oh my gosh is all I could manage to stutter from my lips. Now we need to name this beauty and we'll all ears. Please give some suggestions for a name.
    36 points
  22. In between lockdowns, work, kids footy and endless cancellations of a trip to W.A because of bl@@dy COVID have managed to get out for a few hours here and there with the GPX6. Just short trips to go over old ground where I have found gold before. Unfortunately, 'real prospecting' hasn't had any air time recently. Difficult mode is my go-to around here due to mineralised rocks that light up in Normal (do the same on the GPZ in Normal too) and also the fact that we are saturated at the moment and the red, clay soil has 'come alive'. The GPX6 is just loving the specimen type gold and is reaching depths that the Gold Monster, Equinox and SDC cannot match. Also tested about half a dozen of these signals against a mates GPZ and it couldn't hear them whilst still in the ground (and didn't check once out). As they came out... After a little smashing... Another few hours result...the big piece in this photo ended up having no gold, I think it may be galena?? And a different small spot with heaps of trash where my mate had found a 2.5 gram piece and he felt he had cleaned out an area maybe 6 metres X 6 metres. Found about another 8 targets (the rest trash) including the bigger piece which was about 1 foot or maybe a little more. Sounded like a very soft target at the top, much like a small piece of lead shot. About 5.5 grams but has gone into some acid so might be just under 5 once cleaned. Old mate had done the spot in High Yield/Normal with his GPZ but (I hope he doesn't read this) he is not the most thorough detector operator. I went over the spot again with his GPZ in General/Difficult hoping to get a decent piece that may be hiding a little deeper but got no further targets. The other little pieces were from nearby old diggings. Still loving the GPX6! 😀
    35 points
  23. Memorial Weekend Contest, win a Minelab GPX-6000 in your dreams. Ok, Detector Prospector fans. Most of us have been patiently waiting, some – not so patient. A few of us have even sold/traded our old detector to be ready for the release of the biggest dream of 2021. Here’s your chance to win that dream. BUT WAIT…. There’s more. This is not a dream for just you. That’s right, Gerry has stepped up the prize to the ultimate, most rewarding gift of all. Folks, I’m allowing you and your favorite detecting buddy (that’s what I said, - TWO of you!!!) to experience this dream TOGETHER. Here’s why I have went all out on this very special occasion, and by god it is special. In my 20+ yrs of selling Minelab detectors….I have never lost so much sleep, never tossed/turned/sweated and dreamed to the point where I almost pissed me-self. Heck even my Shepperd kicked me out of my own bed.. he did so. Folks, these dreams are real, their genuine and it hurts. Heck, I was just in the VA clinic last week and they scanned my brain for cause. You know it’s bad, when they tell you to come back next week for more treatment. I overheard one of the assistants and I could swear, they mentioned “Gold Fever”. Oh shit, it can’t be, I kept telling myself. Those flashbacks about took me life times prior. After all, the release of the SD-2100 in the early 90’s, then the big one of the GP-Extreme late 2000, or the popular series GPX in 2006 . Those were pretty bad on me, but that last one, the trickle and tease of the GPZ-7000 almost did me in and this go around, I’m not sure 50/50 I was told? Wife thinks I should double my life insurance, but I told her “it’s an existing condition”. Active posting DP members and just reading gawkers – Here’s the dang truth of it all. We survived. That’s right we did. Each of us had our own issues and some of us are still wearing those Gold Fever Dreamin scars, but we are breathing, walking, talking. And most importantly, we are dreaming. Heck those many scars I carry, at this point, it’s almost a Gold Detectorists Honor to show them off. But some of us do and we do it with PRIDE. Here is where I’d like everyone’s help. The numerous calls, texts, emails to me, my Field Staff, even my dedicated Minelab detector dealer friends, has to stop, if it’s about the GPX-6000. We know, we’ve heard and we’ve read. Bottom line is we want them just as bad as you folks. Heck, I even had to take the customers who were scheduled for training on the April Rye Patch, NV session and move them to the June class. Guess what, it’s almost June and so I’ll probably be moving them to the Fall class (which I just added another class to try and help get customers up to speed). Yes it’s a mess and yes the Covid Gold Fever is real, but us dealers can’t do anything until we get detectors. OK, Enough of the fun and laughs….but you can add some.. he he. In the meantime. I’d like to see you folks get out and celebrate this fine extended Memorial weekend and hopefully use your detectors. I do want to reward those who have read this far down. I (Gerry’s Detectors of Boise, Idaho) am really running a contest for all of you in the United States (sorry to my friends from other countries). I’m asking of US participants to post each day (starting today and posting to this thread), a picture you took this holiday weekend of Memorial Weekend theme with detector in the picture, examples are you family picnic and a detector in the picture, a Veteran memorial with detector, your front yard with American flag and detector in the picture, or you out detecting and camping this fine weekend…and with detector, you get the idea by now. Each day you can post 1 pic and your name will get put in a bucket for each day’s picture. BONUS - picture of “your gold find” with a metal detector. Now, before some of you get crazy with the term “gold find”, I’m talking Au gold, not a piece of gold foil, not a gold colored doodad, but real gold..a coin, a piece of gold jewelry and most certainly a gold nugget, picker or specimen that was found with your metal detector this Memorial Weekend starting today and ending Tuesday, June 1st at 5 PM MST zone. Reason I am going until Tuesday, is many of us will be in the hills and not returning until Tuesday. The BONUS gold picture gets your name in the bucket 2 times per day, max of 10, for those who are fortunate enough to find and post a gold find pic each day. Please don’t beat me as I am trying to have fun for most everyone. Rundown of the rules. 1 picture a day can be posted per DP member. So in reality, you could post a pic of this weekends events each day and end up with 5 entries, but you can only post 1 pic a day. Sometime next week I’ll count the pics and enter your name per amount of posted pics and of Memorial = 1 or Gold = 2, per day (remember 1 post a day no more than total of 5) with the last one by Tuesday, June 1st 5PM MST. I will take a tally and draw (no there will not be some big video show) a name. The winner will get a new Minelab Gold Monster 1000 metal detector courtesy of Gerry’s Detectors. No it’s not a GPX-6000, but it’s a real gold detector. Detector Prospector is the #1 metal detector forum in my opinion and I enjoy reading, learning, sharing pics, seeing gold finds. Go out, get some, spend time with family/friends or alone the way you may and be safe this Memorial Weekend. Don’t forget to think of the reason for this special weekend and the real meaning behind it. As a family of US military myself, I thank you all who have sacrificed for our freedoms and dreams AND SO IS THIS CONTEST – for a Gold Monster 1000 and the chance to dream with your detecting buddy about the GPX-6000. Again, a Memorial Themed pic with detector is 1 name in the bucket that day and a pic of your gold find is a BONUS which puts your name in the bucket 2X per that day. Thanks folks for helping calm the storm of GPX-6000 Gold Fever, as I know it’s real. But the reality is we all need to relax a little and enjoy this weekend...hopefully with detector in hand and surrounded by family/friends, laughter and making memories. PS, I'll probably shut the computer down later today, so chat with you all next week.
    35 points
  24. Based on Jasong's report that a GPX 6000 was on display in Quartzsite, Beatup and I drove up there this morning from sunny Yuma. We did indeed see and touch the machine. There will apparently be other opportunities in the near future including the Quartzite gold show in Feb. Everything is up in the air, so don't count on anything I say as gospel as far as a schedule. Nothing is firm, make your own plans accordingly. The US release is still uncertain but it was suggested perhaps late spring or early summer. I think mid Feb might be overly optimistic. However; we saw and ran the machine albeit in the gravel parking lot of the RV show. Only the DD coil could be run because of the EMI. As of now, the US sales will include the DD coil and an 11" mono coil. There will be a 17" Mono available as an accessory for the machine, but it's US availability upon release of the machine is still in question. The African market has a corner on the market at this point. My observations are this: As stated elsewhere, the machine is an ergonomic dream. Well balanced when fully extended with really nice carbon fiber shafts. The battery pack is detachable and has heavy duty rubber coating on the bottom to absorb shock plus the machine balances perfectly upright when setting it down to dig. The Minelab spiel is no different than the star chart shown previously, so I can't really comment on the accuracy of those claims. We ran the machine in the DD mode to eliminate EMI. We detected .1 and a .2 gram nuggets in the parking lot at a height of about 4 inches. All of that is meaningless as far as it's actual performance in real world conditions, especially as it pertains to the Mono coil. This sneak preview was never intended as actual testing and it started raining while we were there. From my perspective, I would seriously consider a trade down from the GPZ7000 purely from the ergonomics and portability. I would hesitate if the 17" Mono was not immediately available. I'll hit 67 yrs old this summer and just don't get up and down the rough terrain as well, especially with the weight and balance of the GPZ hanging off my shoulder. That's about all I can tell you from a 30 minute preview in a gravel parking lot.
    35 points
  25. One of my customers recently found a stunning: near 4 pound quartz boulder with just under 11 ozt of gold with his GPX-5000. Just goes to show you those multi thousand dollar treasures are still out there being dug up. Yes this came from the lower 48 states. Good luck everyone.
    35 points
  26. I went to hunt a local park this morning with my new Etrac. The ground is freezing up here and I wanted to get out before it’s totally frozen. Since I needed 1 more silver to make 100, I went to the oldest park around, from the 1840s. I went out with low expectations, since I know the park has been pounded over the years. After hunting for about an hour and not finding anything I was getting discouraged. As I was about to head back to the car, I got a very deep, VERY iffy high tone. I told myself Hey maybe they missed a rosie or something. So I dug a nice 7 inch plug and in the plug my pinpointer went off: 1 rusty nail. I rechecked the hole and got an even better high tone. I dug down to about 8 or 9 inches and out came another rusty nail. Then the most beautiful 12-45 signal sang into my ears and I eagerly dug down. At 10 and a half inches: Silver coin edge! I carefully took it out of the hole and got out my spray bottle. It seemed oddly thin for a silver quarter. As the dirt came off the coin I could not believe my eyes and yelled “HOLY $!@?” I got a couple of weird looks but I didn’t care. SPANISH SILVER!!!! I threw down my headphones and ran around doing a happy dance. My 100th silver and I could not have asked for a better one. I quickly ran home to clean it. Turns out it’s from the 1730s from the reign of King Philip 5 of Spain! My oldest coin I’ve ever found! What a way to end the year. I could not get any “in situ” pics because I was shaking so bad! But here are some from when I got home. Thanks for looking!
    34 points
  27. As I advance into my twilight years, I thought I would give the important ladies in my life something to be remembered by. I have over time found quite a few nuggets that don't have any character or beauty. Those are the kinds of nuggets that made up the bulk of the gold in this project and some nice small smooth placer pieces for the topping. I contacted a "Goldsmith" friend and he created this nice gifts for my wife, daughters and grand daughters. Norm
    34 points
  28. Approximately 12 to 14 hours swing time with the 6000 due to the heat.
    33 points
  29. We caught a break in the 90+ temps in Yuma for one last trip. Ostensibly, it was to be a quick trip to the spot we found the bigger gold in Feb and to test the X-Coil 15" Concentric coil over the ground we had covered extensively with the X-Coil 17x12 and stock coil. It's about a 1/2 mile walk to the spot but I pulled up short to detect a wash we were about to cross. My friend with the Concentric coil went on to the target area. I am using the 7000 with stock coil while waiting for some re-work on my patch lead for the X-Coils. I had worked the lower sections of this particular wash back in Feb and found 6 little bits in one small area, the rest of the wash seemed barren. My goal was work the wash towards our target area just to get the machine warmed up and my listening skills tuned in. I was working pretty quick really looking for a sitting duck rather than slow and methodical because this wash hadn't produced too well. About 100 yds on, I hit a pretty good tone right up against the wash sidewall. I pulled out the bigger of non-specie gold in the picture. From there over about 20 yds I pulled 3 more small pieces then hit the smaller specie gold on an inside bend of the wash. I continued up the wash and found the bigger specie dead center of the wash down in the bedrock. I found 1 more tiny bit up on the bank, but then starting hitting a lot of trash targets so I turned around and reworked the wash for 0 nuggets. Because of the specie pieces I then started a circle on the hillsides all around the area for nothing. I put down my gear and walked to the target area to check on my friend with the Concentric coil. He had found 2 pieces in an area well detected on our previous trips and attributed it to the overall sensitivity of the Concentric on small targets. Because of the heat and short trip we had no opportunity to make any comparisons on undug targets. I worked my way back down the wash to the RZR, over areas I had covered in Feb. On the last bend I was picking my way down a slick rock slide area and waved my coil over some overburen covering a layer of bedrock above me. I got a faint tone and started pulling down the overburden and reached some decomposing granite bedrock. The target sound got better so I ended up busting out the bedrock trying to pick up the target down in a deep crack. As I got further down, the target got weaker and I thought I was pushing it deeper in the crack, so I busted out some more bedrock. I finally picked up a half a matchhead size nugget and thought that just couldn't be right. As good as the 7000 is on small gold, that just didn't seem right. I then waved over my spoils pile with all this overburden and busted up granite. Targets everywhere. The sun beating down on me and I'm on my knees sorting through the spoils trying to pinpoint tiny targets with a 14" coil. After about 1/2 hr, I got most of them, 6 matchhead size nuggets. If I had my handy NOX, I could have made short work of this mess, but maybe I'll go back for the crumbs next year. I'm moving to Reno in a couple weeks, I'll be a snowbird in Yuma next year.
    33 points
  30. FINALLY got out on first hunt of the season! Snow capped mountains, plenty of sun, and the temps were cool enough the bugs weren't out yet. The take isn't much (.980g) but FUN, FUN, FUN!!!!!!
    33 points
  31. Sage advice for nugget shooters from the late, great Jim Straight! I always get excited when I come across the old drywasher tailing piles (dryblower heaps) of long abandoned mining claims in the desert. The efficiency of gold recovery using this dry separation method depends on many factors, including the moisture content of the material, its degree of consolidation, the angle of the riffle box and amount of air flow and vibration. Even if all of these conditions are optimal, recovery is never 100% and some gold inevitably ends up in the tailing piles. So, slow and methodical searching of these areas with the gold detector most always guarantees a few bits being added to the poke. Depending on when these placers were mined, the tailings can be hard to recognize, so carefully observing your surroundings while out in the field for these tell-tale clues to productive areas can really pay off. While the coarse tailings have been detected for large nuggets long ago in most instances, the fine piles were left unchecked and can still contain numerous sub-gram nuggets for the keen detector operator. But that's only half of the fun, because searching the virgin ground surrounding these old workings can yield more and larger nuggets, and maybe even an undiscovered nugget patch. Some sub-gram gold recovered from the tailings:
    33 points
  32. I think you know where this is going. Back in early October I posted about finding half of an 18k, rose gold, Cartier Love Bracelet deep in the wet sand on one of my local beaches. Here is another picture of that find: I convinced myself that the other half of the bracelet was still in the same area waiting to be found and looked for it on every hunt since then- maybe a dozen times or so when the conditions seemed right, day or night. Some of my friends thought it was a bit foolish to do so because someone may have already found it- if it was even lost in the first place. In the meantime I would be missing out on other more productive sites they said. However, I reasoned that while looking for the other bracelet half, I would find collateral finds and, sure enough, the spot produced a few gold rings and assorted silver rings, chains and earrings. Earlier this week, conditions looked promising for another recovery attempt with extreme tides and impressive swells in the forecast. However, I was having one of my worst hunts in recent memory with only a couple of lightweight pieces of trash in over an hour of detecting. When I got a faint whisper of a signal, the kind that makes you question if it is just your imagination, I scooped out several mounds of wet sand and the detector was now screaming loud over the pile of excavated sand to the side of the hole. I looked down and saw a half-oval impression on top of the mound. I reached down and felt the object and at the same time saw a familiar rose gold colored half-bracelet in my hand. I have had a few surreal moments while detecting before but I don't think that anything will ever top this one when I truly questioned if what I was experiencing was real. I turned the bracelet around to see the "Cartier" logo that I knew would be there since it wasn't on the other half that I had already found. Funny but at that instant I had one of those "deja vu" moments of having been there before. I went and sat on the beach "cut" to collect my thoughts, offer a prayer of gratitude and enjoy the moment. I didn't have my cell phone on me for fear of it getting wet but when I got to the car I took a quick picture: And, of course, a couple more when I got home: The two pieces fit together perfectly! There are minor scratches on the bracelet that I think were already on it when it was lost. Hard to say how long ago the bracelet had been lost but my guess would be fairly recently because the 2 halves were found very close to one another. Some of my friends suggested that I not post about this find and I know that they have good intentions but I felt that this experience had to be shared. I have learned a lot from this experience. I have little concern if this story leads to a reunion of the bracelet with the person who lost it. In fact, I am already taking steps to try to return it. I, and many other hunters, know that the real thrill in detecting is in the finding- not in the owning. Thanks for reading- GL&HH!
    33 points
  33. We've been in a bit of a Covid lock-down recently and during that time my Garrett 24k arrived so I wasn't able to use it in the gold fields straight away, it was quite painful to look at it knowing I can't go and use it, fortunately we came out of our lock-down and as took off for a prospect with the 24k as soon as I could. I ordered a White's 6" concentric coil for it to tie me over until Garrett and with any luck Nel come out with other coils for it, I hope they continue with the 6" Concentric as I'll buy a Garrett 6" Concentric as soon as they release it. It's a remarkably sensitive coil, I expected it to be less sensitive than it is as it's quite big however it surprised me and matches or exceeds smaller coils on other high frequency gold detectors. I've always been happy with Garrett coil quality so upgrading the Whites to a Garrett would be worthwhile I think. In saying that, neither the 10x6" Garrett coil or the Whites 6" coil were at all bump sensitive, not one bump noise the entire day. I'm so used to coil bump sensitivity from the Equinox and Gold Monster it was a rather pleasurable experience being able to scrub the coil on the ground like mad and bump it around not setting off the detector, giving me a distinct advantage over using bump sensitive coils. I started the day using the 10x6" Coil as I wanted to see how it goes and I was going back to a spot I'd found a fair few grams of gold in the past, about 30 or more nuggets using the scrape and detect method taking off layers of soil at a time and detecting it. The initial nugget which was just under half a gram and a fair few more were found using my GPZ including a 4.2 gram nugget and then I brought in the Equinox with 6" coil to clean up as a majority of the nuggets were very small and the VLF's tend to do better cleaning up these very small nuggets. I'd even gone over this little scrape and detect area with the Gold Bug 2 however it was a bit of a nightmare as the area is absolutely full of hot rocks and the Gold Bug 2 in heavy hot rocks isn't a good detector in my opinion, it's too busy making it's response noise to the hot rocks to worry about the bits of gold next to the hot rocks so you miss nuggets if they're near hot rocks. The problem is this spot is loaded with hot rocks all through the soil of various shapes and sizes mostly a green type of schist that is all crumbly and broken up and detectors love to sound off on it. It's likely there from the old timers, it's basically some old workings where the old timers left their rock pile in a little gully, and right on the lower downhill side of the rock pile was my little scrape and detect patch. Even the GPZ struggled with all of the hot rocks so I was quite pleased how the 24k was coping with them, sure it was sounding off on some of them too but it wasn't too troublesome and seemed to ignore the little broken up bits and very usable. I ran the 24k with the sensitivity maxed out, Sat on the middle setting and audio on Boost 2. The ground balance was quick and easy then I switched into the Locked balance mode. If the broken up schist bits of hot rock were too severe I left it in tracking which helped to knock them out. I gave the 6" Concentric coil a quick try and it struggled more with the hot rocks and i didn't want to lower my sensitivity down so I reverted back to the DD which appeared to handle them better and is still remarkably sensitive. So I just started scraping back layers and detecting taking about 2 inches off at a time knowing the gold here is likely going to be very small and it will be stuff I've missed in the past as I've scraped this spot out before and back filled it so I was essentially checking the same soil all over again for anything I missed. I had high hopes I had missed some as all it would take is a small hot rock to be sitting on top of the bit of gold the previous time and I'd likely miss it or just the bit of gold on it's side being a very thin one or any number of reasons, even just at a depth too deep for the size of gold with the detector I was using. It wasn't long and I had my first piece. Quite a decent size one too, I was baffled at the time why I'd missed this one in the past. The 24k had now found it's first gold, highly likely the first piece of gold found in New Zealand with the Garrett 24k, a badge I'll wear proudly. 🙂 Next up was a reasonably faint but very repeatable signal with no target ID showing, I delicately used my scoop to scrape soil away knowing this was likely a very small bit of gold and it sure was... my smallest bit of the day too and surprised I managed to find it with the 10x6" coil, I don't recall ever finding a bit this small using the 10x5" type size on other detectors. Can you spot it? 🙂 There it is! 0.007 of a gram, not bad for the 10x6" coil, especially in this hot rock infested ground. I always check targets in case they're odd little bits of metal with my pick magnet, and you'll see it was quick to build up black sand, this soil has plenty of it in it. I kept scraping down layers and found another. Quite small too... but a bit more meat on it than the previous one 🙂 I'd had enough of the scrape and detect spot by now and wanted to go explore a bit to see how the 24k performed for general detecting so I walked for about 10 minutes to another spot I'd found some gold in the past and detected for about an hour digging plenty of shotgun pellets, completely normal in this area as there is a rabbit plague that causes countless thousands of shotgun pellets to be distributed all over the place for me to clean up 🙂 I didn't have high hopes as myself and a friend (JW) have absolutely thrashed this area but it's always possible to miss gold when there is so many pellets. We generally scrape a few times and if the signal persists dig it, if it moves after the first scrapes ignore it thinking it's very likely a pellet. A few pictures of the sort of terrain I was detecting. My batteries went down to 2 bars quite quickly, within an hour. I assume as they're rechargeable and run at 1.2 volts instead of 1.5 volts for standard AA's but it stayed at the two bars for the entire day so still plenty of life left in them yet by the looks of it. Pretty wild rocky terrain and only really suitable for smaller coils. The GPZ with it's stock coil is terrible here, the smaller the coil the better in general. I did manage to find a piece though, after a lot of pellet digs 🙂 Not a bad size bit for the area too I now decided I'd put the Whites 6" Concentric coil on and give it another go as this area doesn't have near as many hot rocks as my scrape and detect spot. I found a bit of raised bedrock and had a signal that persisted down into the schist. At this point it almost had to be gold so I started filming. And it was gold 🙂 I had to break up the schist to get it out. A nice little piece too, a roundish flat one. This area has plenty of black sand too, this was my pick after checking that bedrock in case it was a steel shotgun pellet. It was getting near time to go get some dinner and I was pretty satisfied to even get one nugget in this area but I kept going a little while longer and it paid off. I like the bulls eye sight on the 6" coil, it really is the hot spot too, great for pinpointing. I had a signal that persisted down into the gravels on the bedrock. And got this one! It's hard to tell the depth in the photo but it was a reasonable depth. A few inches anyway. And that was it for the day, I was starving! So, do I like the 24K? You're damn right I do, it certainly exceeded my expectations and will now be my primary VLF gold detector replacing my Equinox which replaced my Gold Monster, and the Gold Bug 2 was just not for me, I didn't gel with it at all especially with the masking from hot rocks. I look forward to getting more coils for the 24k, especially smaller ones, and judging by how well it handled the hot rocks I wouldn't mind a larger size coil for ground coverage too. The total for the day. Very happy with the results.
    32 points
  34. Sourdough Scott and I have been detecting hillside that has never been mined before and doing quite well with finding gold. It confounded us both as to why this location was left untouched by the early miners. When I discovered the answer it sent chills down my spine. I hate it when I start finding a lot of gold in a small area because that means I have to dig all the trash even when I know it's a tin can, shovel head, copper still, or a locomotive and I am basically a very lazy prospector. To make matters worse this spot must have been where the 1927 world champion squirrel hunting competition took place as there is an extraordinary quantity of lead and brass. There are also bits of steel cable, nuts and bolts, Caterpillar parts and hobnails from numerous logging operations which occurred there through the years. One bit of trash that caught my attention was a pristine 50 caliber musket ball as they sound exactly like a large gold nugget. I put it in my pocket and continued on. Then, not far away, I found the remains of an ancient musket. I knew this had the makings of a Detector Prospector story so I took the ball and musket home for some forensic research. Here are the horrifying results of my research findings. Upon microscopic examination of the musket ball I discovered a minute speck of fossilized blood. By using the DNA identification app on my smarty pants phone I discovered it was blood from the much feared Plumas Mammoth Grizzly! I then began analysis of the musket. By getting my 51 caliber finger stuck in the 50 caliber barrel I was able to conclude beyond any doubt that the musket was the very one that fired the bloody ball. I then closely examined the musket exterior and made three shocking discoveries! One was a patch of dried blood that proved to be from a human male of about forty years of age, dating from 1852. The next was another bloodstain that matched that which was found on the musket ball, identified as being from a Plumas Mammoth Grizzly. The third discovery (and this is where it gets scary) were bite marks which by careful measurement proved to be that of a grizzly over 11 feet tall and weighing nearly a ton! The only logical conclusion from my research is that the doomed prospector discovered the same rich deposit that Sourdough Scott and I found, became distracted with finding gold and not paying attention to his surroundings, mortally wounding the grizzly when he was attacked by surprise but was disassembled by the grizzly before it succumbed from it's wound. That is why this rich strike has remained unworked for 169 years.
    32 points
  35. Basically was a matter of transferring gear, cleaning up with new carpet covering and installing in new Toyota Troop Carrier from the old 1986 Troopy, "Back to the Future" project. No photos of old Troopy setup as took very few photos back in those days. Of interest perhaps old 86 Troopy cost 50 ozs new, was very basic, leaf springs front and back and a diesel motor that couldn`t pull your hat off but will go forever. New Troopy cost 35ozs has coils on front, A/C, Navi Screen, electric windows, locking front and rear diffs, electric winch, V8 diesel that`l pull a CAT etc etc. but fortunately the body is still the same thus everything fitted, holes were in same place. Solar charges 2x125A/hr AGMs, which powers all including a 2000W Inverter for this coffee snob, nothing beats an Expresso as one waits for the sun to come up. Separate Fridge and Freezer accessible from sliding side windows, I camp on a stretcher with a swag and awning sides for when cold or wet. Have a small 11ft off-road caravan but rarely use as is too much trouble getting it into our rugged NQ OZ. I think the below photos tell the story.
    32 points
  36. I found this on a quick adventure in between jobs. It’s the prettiest nugget in my collection. Weighs under a gram but man it was fun! I found that running the EQ800 in single frequency really helped stability in this red hot ground. Here it is fresh out of the ground. On the 6 inch coil which helped me get between boulders to find it. After some toothbrush action almost looks like one of the 50 fired bullets I found today. But I’ll call it a flowing hair nugget instead. Maybe the coin shooters will let me hunt with them. Weigh in on the cheapo scale. Wasn’t wearing gloves because I’m no Nancy boy. But maybe I should have been. I think there was a parable about the guy above and his friend. It’s ok I needed the exercise anyways. But next time I’ll bring my big saw just in case. Hand stacked rocks are sometimes a good sign. The poison oak was in bloom, the air was sub freezing, and the square nails and bullets were practically jumping out of the ground. But hey I got a cool piece of gold, paid for my gas and got some threshold meditation in so it’s a win win for me.
    32 points
  37. Okay, I hit the Minelab booth at the Quartzsite gold show this morning, and got to swing the GPX 6000 over a couple of targets that I brought along, asked Debbie some questions about the machine and its tech, as well as snapped some photos of the box. So one of the targets I brought is a tiny flake of a nugget that is invisible to the Zed, but a VLF will hit on it all day long. The GPX 6000 with the 14” DD coil in EMI cancel mode had no trouble seeing it, which is quite impressive; the detector was set up this way because there was too much EMI present to operate the 11” mono coil. I also brought along a small, 1 gram chondrite meteorite, and waving it over the coil produced a significant response from the detector. So the GPX 6K is definitely super sensitive. Debbie showed me that, while the pitch of the threshold tone is not adjustable, the threshold tone can be turned on and off by a long press of the normal/difficult ground type button. The threshold pitch to me seems to be preset to around the default pitch of the GPZ 7000, about halfway between the highest and lowest pitches. I asked about the price and availability of any accessories, like the 17” mono coil, and the reply was that there is no information yet. I also asked if she knew what GeoSense is and how it works, to which she answered that the machine is continuously adjusting to the ground and EMI. When I asked if the 6000's normal and difficult timings are blends of the soil timings that are used in the GPX 5000, the answer was no. I didn't see any kind of port on the detector that would enable a connection to a computer for a software update, and Debbie doesn't think it is updatable. You'll notice on the box that the weight of the detector is 5.1 pounds, and I'm assuming that is with the 14”DD coil attached, as it is noticeably heavier than both the 11” and 17” mono coils. Minelab GPX 6000 Data & Reviews
    32 points
  38. Pretty happy with this little nug, it registered like an old button (13-15) and came out in the first shovel. Using gold mode 1, sens 22, 6" coil, tracking. We were originally looking for goldfield relics, just sat down for a break and decided to try for some little bits of gold and got this as my second ever piece.
    32 points
  39. I enjoy Rye Patch area in October and sometimes November before the snow accumulates. My 7 performs best this time of year and the day temps in 60-70s is ideal. What I like most about this region is the variety of natural gold nuggets. So far I've been able to score a couple small Chevron pieces and a dozen or so small .1 gram to 1 gram pieces. My total weight so far is just over 10 grams. No, this is nothing to write home about as for gold weight wise, but one of them is $$$. It's a 1.2 gram collector nugget. I've only found 4 or 5 of these beauties in my 25+ yrs of hunting nuggets. I posted this picture on Facebook and have a couple offers, but I have a habit of falling in love with my gold finds. Does anyone know what something like this would sell for to a collector? Yes I realize there are many variables, but just want to get an idea. BTW, if anyone else has found these kind, I'd love to see some pictures. Thanks everyone for input and good luck on your next swing. PS my phone is acting up and not working half the time so it's hard to promise any replies right away. Thanks for being patient.
    32 points
  40. A short window of luck has given me another gold coin . Eleven days ago while on an organized field day with many prospectors i came across an old miners camp site . Being a relic focused detectorist i worked the site hard . The other coins from the site point to occupation between 1870 - 1890 so finding a 1798 gold Spade Guinea created quite a stir ! Minting of this coin stopped in 1799 . In 1798 my state was not populated by the English and was only just being found to be a separate land mass from mainland Australia . I still get a smile on my face when i think of finding this coin ! 25mm diameter , 8.4 grams . Solid 18 on the Nox in ground [5 inches] and out .
    32 points
  41. Excalibur Rules! Summer season is now over, took me a few hunts in June to find a decent spot but It's been giving every since, 13 straight hunts with gold. July 3rd to Sept 4th ..........Summer gold count 30, 27 Gold rings, 3 misc. Gold (174 grams)....130 Silvers, mostly coins.......the July 3rd gold was with the AQ..which is setting for right now ...... due to the amount of time I can get out and hunt, the AQ requires a lot more work when hunting and the excalibur fits the one spot perfect and finds gold...... Kind of Funny, I posted this on a Excalibur Facebook Page and Got a over whelming response, and had a few, I guess who had never seen a Class ring and a few thought they were fake rings? Anyway all worked out, had to delete a couple of the post to keep the peace. Come on Fall! And the Silver..as bad as it gets..bay is terrible on it.
    31 points
  42. After 3 years with a friend's DFX and 4 years with my own Makro Gold Racer, I finally found gold. Tried a new spot and a new technique. I found 63 pieces in 5 days and my buddy found 81 working right next to me with a Gold Monster. My little VLF can't compete with the big iron, so I needed a new method. I started digging where the bedrock went under the sand and gravel. Following the bedrock along, I noted a few small spots of cemented gravel in cracks and holes in the bedrock. Carefully excavating these gravel patches and detecting as I went let to a wonderful few days. Just detecting from the surface has proven to be a waste of my time.
    31 points
  43. Went on a couple of hunts this past week trying to put my new Coiltek 10x5 Nox coil through its paces and then using my trusty Deus at my favorite relic farm site with numerous iron patches and high mineralization. Tested the Nox coil out on a Colonial site and scored a couple of keepers at decent depth in sandy soil including a flat Tombac button and a brass makeup case with a fancy "wreath" design. Snagged a tiny flat button there when switching over to the Deus and round 9" hf coil. in thick iron. A week later it was off to my relic paradise site we have been pounding regularly for a few years and steadily since November when I got the privilege to hit it after harvest and deep discing and snagged a $1 gold piece and about 30 other relics - perhaps my most productive single day ever. The site "refreshes" itself with every plowing. Anyway the finds were tailing off and this was the last trip before spring planting. Took the Deus out and got on the board quickly with a minie ball. Started pulling different types of minie balls including a .69 caliber "fatty", a confederate Gardner, and a really rare dropped .54 cal Merrill carbine, as well as some "generic" 3 ringers. But the highlight was an iffy high conductor signal - hoping for any silver at this point because they have been few and far between at this site, lately. Little did I know that I would be checking off a bucket lister that I have been hoping to snag for some time now. Flipped the plug and knew what I had with just a glimpse. Welcome to the finds pouch my freshly dug 1835 Capped Bust Liberty Dime. Some non-metallic eyeball finds and miscellaneous brass and lead fragments including a porcelain 4-hole button rounded out the day. Enjoy the pics...
    31 points
  44. The weather may have turned for the better in Northern Nevada. It was time to get out and check how my GPZ 7000, would handle the moisture/salt from the Winter Storms. I pulled into the Burn Barrel to camp, but it was like pulling into a KOA. I unloaded my trusty RZR and hit the trail to find a nugget. I ran into several folks out trying their luck, all had smiles on their faces and enjoying our outdoor hobby. I was told that Gerry was having his training at the Burn Barrel which explained the crowd of RV’s. I did get time for a short visit with Gerry and Lunk, before heading out. The soil, is a little noisy with High Yield/Normal. Using Difficult settled it down perfectly, but not my preferred setting for dink nuggets. Anyways, I hunted in Normal and ground balanced often to give my ears a rest from the noisy ground. I didn’t find any dink nuggets which are the Bread & Butter to any poke, but did find a couple of Steak & Lobster nuggets before loading up and heading home from the short Dirt Recon Trip. There’s gold out there, you just need to get your coil over it, I need some Bread & Butter Nuggets to complete my meal. Talking about meals, my Dog Marley refused to eat his normal dog grub on this trip, and only wanted what I brought “Fried Chicken”. Until the next Hunt! LuckyLundy
    31 points
  45. Years ago I had a wise customer who was always trying to make things better. He spent much of his free time chasing gold nuggets at Rye Patch, NV in the 90's and early 2000's (when pickings were good). He always wanted to cover ground and chase the big ones. One time he calls me to order some Coiltek coil wiring (extension) as he has long dreams. I seen him out there with his new long shaft and boy was it longer than I had expected. Has anyone seen anything similar or just as crazy? On a side note, this beautiful Horse Nugget of 6 ounces was found in the road at Rye Patch proper. Seems most of us had walked over it for years thinking a beer can in the middle of the road when in fact it was the biggest piece of gold I have seen come from Rye Patch. I know one of my Staff found a 5+ oz'er one time and Chuck/Gracie from TX showed me a 5 oz'er, but this one has character. If anyone knows of bigger gold nuggets from actual Rye Patch proper or of a longer shaft on their Minelab, I'd love to see. Enjoy everyone and stay out of my swing path, all 30 feet of it.
    31 points
  46. My winter season has officially ended. A total of 39 detecting days, 88 grams (argh, just short of 3 oz I was trying for) minus a couple grams traded for supplies along the way. Definitely no great bonanza this year, but by the looks of it I have almost paid for a new 6000 if I decide to get one. Anyone looking to buy nuggets let me know. 10% under spot if bought in 1/2 oz+ lots and I have another half lb or so at home slated for the refiner soon too if anyone wants bulk. I know it's not the prettiest gold, but it's cheap. 😄 About half this came from reworking older patches. The other half come from exploring but I wasn't able to find anything except scattered small patches this season so never quite hit the jackpot as in previous seasons. Thank you to X Coils for giving me a new 8" coil to play with, it was responsible for many of the smaller nuggets in the photo, as well as a couple of the bigger ones including the speci. It was nice to swing the GPZ with no bungee when using it and to feel truly mobile for the first time with any "big gun" detector. My field report on that coil is elsewhere on this site, no need to go into it here. For anyone who visited me at my land - I am packed up and leaving and this place is officially sold to a new owner as of tomorrow. So, don't come a knockin' cause he might have a shotgun 😄 Best of luck to the new owner. I have some plans in store for the spring/summer and next winter, thanks in large part to people who have generously offered knowledge and assistance. So, one chapter ends and I will be moving along to the next now. For now it's time to go home and finish the construction work I left behind this fall, get some money for an RV again to pursue this prospecting thing again when the ground thaws up North. Good luck to everyone I met and spoke with for the rest of this winter season, and to everyone else! Jason
    31 points
  47. I was sent this coil for free to use and keep by the manufacturer many months ago with no expectations of reviews or anything else, and I had intended many times to test it in Nevada for my own personal use, but work kept delaying me and I never made it. But I was able to finally get free from work and give it a solid 12 hours of run time over 2 days in Arizona since it's winter now. Soils are mild, few hotrocks (more on that in a moment). 40-50F degrees out. Mostly shallow, rocky washes or hilltops I've pounded with the stock and 17" X Coil (as well as a 4500). I consider these spots flogged and dead for my purposes, and so great places to see if new products can find missed gold. My observations were as follows: This coil (as expected with a smaller coil) was noticeably quieter than the 17" coil and the stock coil. I was able to bump my threshold up 8-10 points and still had about the same threshold chatter as I did with the 17" coil. I usually run 18 sensitivity here because I like a very stable threshold and EMI can be an issue, but I bumped up to 20 sensitivity with no problem. The coil ground balanced ok and I ran in auto which seemed to work fine. This coil loves hotrocks, as would be expected when you are running a smaller, more sensitive coil. I was finding hotrocks deep, shallow, and in places I considered more or less hotrock free in the past. Conversely, I hope it will do well in salt, which I hope to test this summer in Nevada. This coil is bump sensitive This coil is sensitive to a lot of vegetation, particularly sticks/twigs and grasses. I'm unsure if it's detecting them or bumping them. This coil screams on tiny nuggets just out of range of the stock coil. It gives decent signal on edge of detection, tiny nuggets that I missed with the 17" coil. The light weight made me very much more prone to lift up and detect side walls, benches, and pick up and poke/prod into just about any place I encountered, from beginning of day to end. The weight didn't fatigue my arm after a half day of swinging, 5 or 6 hours. Much of that time was without a bungee. This coil eminates a faint, very high pitched squeel or buzz if you get your ear close to it Overall, detecting with the GPZ feels a lot more pleasurable and less like fighting your equipment with a coil of this size and weight. I've mentioned it in prior posts, but take my word from experience now - it's not the weight of the GPZ that causes problems, it's the coil. And this 8" coil is almost the perfect weight to counterbalance the GPZ with the shaft fully extended - ie, this is the coil weight the GPZ should have been designed for. I'll take another pound on the control box no problem, but add 100 or 200 grams onto the coil end, that causes fatigue. Swinging the GPZ with this coil (or any coil of this weight) is a pleasure and not oppressive. The bump sensitivity I'm guessing is a relic of trying to cram so much wire into a tiny space that might not be meant for it, as I get the feeling that this coil is pressing the limits of how small a Super D can be built. But it does mean that I have to slow down and really concentrate on not hitting rocks or vegetation, which ends up being ok because this is a cleanup coil where I am going slow anyways. I expected to find a handful of faint, edge of detection signals I had missed with my other coils. But other than a couple nuggets, almost all the signals were bright, some even loud, and all pretty obvious. Even right out in the middle of the wash. This coil hits hard on tiny stuff. I haven't compared it to the GB2 or Gold Monster, but I found stuff down to 0.06-0.07 grams and they were all great signals. Pinpointing these tiny targets with the coil edge can be difficult as the center of the coil is more sensitive. And they are too tiny to register on my pinpointer, especially the porous and not flaky ones. And that is why I think I missed all the nuggets originally which I later found with the 8" - its a lot easier to get the center of the coil over more of the potential ground, especially with obstructions in the way. In the end, I didn't find a lot of missed nuggets in nooks and crannies, most of them were simply next to a rock or other obstruction like a bush which I was able to get the center of the 8" much closer to. Overall this seems like a good coil for working steep areas (Colorado comes to mind), surface patches, tight washes, and banks/vertical surfaces. The bump sensitivity is the only real major downside, so a slow and controlled swing is important with this coil I think. If NF doesn't end up releasing some critical sizes of coils and new detector releases make the GPZ cheaper (and less risky to make an adapter) then serious detectorists may want to give X Coils another thought. Because right now I can't help but feel like with these coils I am running a new detector that no one else has access to in a way, and I'm somewhat surprised more hard detectorists/enthusiasts haven't availed themselves of this opportunity. But, in the same respect I'm happy, because my time is slim and I haven't had a chance to put them over a lot of places I know others would have flogged to death already. My favorite coil by far is still the 17", but if this 8" (and the 10") perform well in NNV then I may change my mind on that. Here are the nuggets I found (weights are estimated) and my recollection of why I thought I missed them originally with all my other equipment but then found them with the 8" X Coil: Test Wash 1, less than 0.1 gram, too deep for other coils Test Wash 1, 0.08 grams, next to a rock and slightly into wash bank Test Wash 1, 0.12 grams, from a boot scrape and I had given up finding this with the 17" for some reason Test Wash 1, 1+ gram, next to a rock and oriented vertically in a bedrock crack, not sure why I didn't hear this on at least 6 or 7 previous passes since it's right in the wash, but it didn't produce a diggable signal with other coils/machines Test Wash 1, .2 grams, in a little ring of rocks, was only a few inches deep though Test Wash 1, .15 grams, too deep/edge of detection, or too close to rocks Test Wash 1, 0.12 grams, no idea, great signal and should have found before Test Wash 1, 0.15 grams, in side of bank, arm was probably always too tired to raise the coil up there Test Wash 2, 0.12 grams, no idea why it was missed before, right in middle of wash Test Wash 2, 0.3 grams, 2ft up wash side Bench patch, 0.3 grams, next to cactus, too deep/edge of detection? Bench patch, 0.08 grams, too deep/edge of detection Bench patch, 0.06 grams, edge of detection That was all of them. Smallest was 0.06 grams and very porous and almost on surface, largest was like 1.1 grams but I forget the exact weight. All total was a little over 4 grams out of severely beat up washes and a patch. Not much, but it did pay for my gas down here at least. I think once stuff gets below 0.15 grams, it's not really worth my time to chase on general principal. But when you need to grind out some finds for gas, food, whatever, and if you have a lot of patches that produced more than 5 or 6 stray nuggets, then this little guy can probably pop up a few more when you really need them.
    31 points
  48. These were all the good targets for my brother and myself the first tens days out this december. All GPZ 7000 finds.
    31 points
  49. Did some relic hunting today with the intention of comparing some detectors (Deus, Tarsacci) but the Deus was on fire and besides keeping me from running a detector comparison test it also made it more difficult for me to proclaim 2020 a complete and total dumpster fire, but there is still another month to go.... Anyway, about a hour into the hunt, with the Deus connected to the 11" X35 coil and set at 12 khz with pitch tones and reactivity at about 2.5, I had found some keeper lead and brass. Then I happened upon a strong, 45- 47 signal. Thought it was likely can slaw but I was digging any repeatable non-ferrous signal. My handheld pinpointer indicated it was not deep, and I used my digger to come at it from a safe angle, just in case, and low and behold, out popped my first ever gold coin find - 1849 Open Wreath $1 Gold Piece. It was surreal. My digging partner thought I was kidding, but there it sat glimmering in daylight. Sent a text over to prove it since we were appropriately social distancing (something that comes naturally with this hobby). What a great initiation into the GC club. Needless to say, I kept swinging the Deus for the rest of the day except for a brief half-hearted attempted to see if I could get the Tarsacci going, but save for one so-so brass target, it was a Deus day. I swapped to my 9" round HF coil after the Tarsacci run and finshed up strong with some button, buckle, and bullet finds. One of my best detector single day outings ever in terms of both quantity and quality of relic finds. Only missing silver on this trip, but not complaining. Hopefully, this was a just a preview of what might be in store for 2021, as 2020 has been pretty much a lost year for many of us as far as detecting and other life pursuits go. The Tarsacci/Deus bake off will just have to wait for another day. Stay safe out there and happy hunting. CG
    31 points
  50. Not that I wanted to see if it could be done, it’s only 130 miles! My Wife Robin, needed to dig a nugget...she hasn’t been out since our move to Reno. Now, you always have a mental note of stuff to pack. We loaded her Grand Cherokee, for this adventure off we go! Arrived to a location, I figured she’d have some luck at with her SDC 2300. Gearing up, I’m looking for both of our new Doc’s Scoops...What the Heck! Left them both at home! Well, I know I’ve used my hand as a scoop a few times! But, onetime I forgot my scoop and as I was recovering a nugget I opened my hand to see the target and a Scorpion crawled out of my hand and the nugget went sky high, I later found its landing spot. Since then, I’ve learned that a cut water bottle will get ya by as a scoop and save you from tossing good target to the wind. Well, needless to say Robin got her fix of digging/finding some gold with her detector in and old patch, that both of us and countless others have swung on before! Nuggets are funny, some days they are like fish biting all day and other days not a bite! But, the Hunt and adventure is the most important to balance your inner self, Gold is just the bonus in our hobby! Until the next hunt! LuckyLundy
    31 points
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