Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/03/2022 in all areas

  1. I made a quick trip to Alaska recently, where I still have family, and ties to my old business. While there, I took advantage of an opportunity, and did something I have always wanted to do. Go metal detecting for gold nuggets in the Nome area! I've been to Nome a couple times in the past, but it was just passing through. And it seems I was always too busy finding gold someplace else, to ever make it to Nome to find gold. I had a day of travel, three days detecting, and another day of travel. Not as long as I would like, but as things turned out just perfect. I had a typical Alaska style adventure just getting a truck rented, and finally made it to the mine location that evening after a full day of flying. The weather in Nome was stunning blue skies. Here are a couple pictures of the beach and the view off the road to the mine. Click or double click on on the photos that follow, to get larger high res versions. The Beach at Nome, Alaska Along the road north of Nome (Teller Highway) I got settled into my accommodations and talked with the miners about what they were doing. Nobody had used a detector successfully here, and I was hoping to give them some information about their ground, in return for this chance to find a little gold. I always am a little hesitant when I arrive in unfamiliar territory and people, but everyone was very nice. Weather was perfect, and most amazingly, a cold snap had put the mosquitos down. I could not ask for a better start. I hit the a more recent place they had mined and done well, and like many far north gold mines situated in tundra and permafrost, the thing was a mud pit. There was a surprising amount of blue clay in the material. There are no glaciers in the Nome area today, but what I was looking at was classic dense, blue glacial clay deposits. It's a good thing I had packed my mud boots, just in case. And in fact, my very first Nome nugget came out of a gravel layer, right under one of these clay deposits. It was right on the edge of the cut, where they had stopped due to hitting permafrost. A few days had allowed the stuff to thaw, or otherwise I'd be hacking at stuff tougher than asphalt. First nugget from hole next to Axiom search coil My first Nome Gold! The spot they were working was both virgin ground, and old tailings, so the material was full of ferrous junk, and a few non-ferrous items like shotgun shell ends. Working in mud is not very fun, as I had to use care to not get myself stuck in a bad spot, and excavating many targets was an exercise in trying to find a small thing in a handful of sticky goo. But I hunted a long day in the northern summer sun, determined to make the most of my limited time. I ended the day with a little over 14 grams of nice gold nuggets. The last few came from a hot spot in a brown layer, but after excavating a few nuggets, I hit permafrost. I left the last signal, figuring I would come back later after it had a chance to thaw some more. Anyone thinking it's nuts to leave a nugget signal, has never tried to hack into permafrost. It's ice mixed with sand and gravel, and it tends to dent more than chip away. Really tough stuff. First day of detecting in Nome area with Garrett Axiom The next day I explored around more, and hit quite a bit of exposed bedrock along the creek, above the current workings. There were plenty of old workings up the creek still, but this bedrock was surprisingly devoid of targets. It made me wonder if somebody had detected it at some time in the past, and I think that's a fairly decent bet. It's hard to find places where a detector has never been these days, and this bedrock was a glaringly obvious place to hunt gold. Yet I found no gold, and only a couple trash targets. I did spy some large old tailing piles up the creek, the sort I am used to hunting in Interior Alaska. Large steep piles of gravel, stacked against one side of the small valley with a dragline. I had very little gold to show for the day so far, so that afternoon I hiked up though the brush and wet creek areas, to get to these old piles. They were very steep, but washed loose material, easy digging, and no sign of dig holes. I started at the tops, and wound my way back and forth across the faces of the piles. The Axiom was really great at this due to its light weight. Heavy machines are ok in flat ground if you harness up properly, but swinging uphill on a steep hillside is something else. A couple trash targets, then a nice, deep nugget. Oh boy, I was excited now! I had left a warning about where I was going, with instructions to send out a rescue party if I was not back by a certain time, so I had a hard cut off point I had to keep an eye on, allowing for time to hike back out. I therefor got with the program, and scanned as efficiently as I could. I got all but the last couple piles in this little set done, before I just had to walk away and get back to camp. But my few hours detecting had me getting close to 3/4 ounce of nice, chunky gold nuggets! They were all old gold, coated with what I am guessing was manganese oxide and/or iron oxides. I showed off my gold, got a quick bite to eat, and went back up that evening to hunt the last couple piles. And got a couple more nuggets, just over 25 grams total for the day. The largest was right at 10 grams, my largest for this trip, and almost completely coated with oxides. Pretty cool looking actually, something different from the norm. It shows the old timers were losing some pretty large gold, no doubt due to poor recovery systems. It might be economical to mine these tailings again with better equipment, since they are clean and stacked, ready to process. Top of a tailing pile View down the pile - bigger and steeper than it looks! 10 gram nugget, the largest found on this visit, from the old tailing piles Dark gold off the old tailing piles I had only one full day left to hunt, which seemed like not enough by far. However, the forecast called for a big storm moving in the next day, the day I was leaving. With that in mind leaving seemed like a pretty good idea, because if things were a mudhole in nice weather, it was bound to be a real mess in pouring rain. I decided to hit the newer workings again, since I had covered the closer old tailing piles halfway well, and the next set up was quite a ways up the creek, and some wet ground in between. The hot spot I had left as frozen was my first destination, and a good choice this turned out to be. The ground had thawed more than I expected in 48 hours, and I got that first nugget out in minutes. Then another. And another. This was a seam of blue clay, with some coffee ground colored brown gravels just on top. The clay was a classic false bedrock. The brown color is from the water percolating down through the gravel, picking up iron minerals as it goes. It hits the impervious clay layer, and stays there, or travels laterally on top of it. In the process, the iron oxides get deposited, creating a distinct brown layer of gravel and sand, usually inches thick, sometimes a foot or two. I encountered this very same pay layer at my old mine at Moore Creek, where we called it "coffee grounds" due to the color of the generally sandy material. It was a sign of the best and richest material, and looked like the exact same scenario here. Digging into the paysteak with Garrett 24K and Axiom Closeup of blue clay exposed in middle, and brown material just on top of it I was literally scraping nuggets off the clay layer, and finding some larger ones embedded in the top few inches of the clay. While doing so, I noticed the sand was full of smaller gold. Visibly scattered through the sand and gravel! I scooted back to camp fast, and grabbed a gold pan, plus a Garrett 24K. My plan was to use the super hot 24K to isolate tiny bits, then just scoop them into the pan, until I got a pan full, then pan them out. Far faster than chasing really tiny bits one at a time. I fired up the 24K, a hot, high frequency VLF, and got a big surprise. Every swing, there were rocks banging out like gold nuggets. They were all over in the gravel, though possibly more concentrated in this pay layer. I've only seen this stuff in one other location before in all my years of detecting. Graphitic slate. Graphite is used to make pencil lead, and more revealing, battery posts. It is non-ferrous and quite conductive. In fact, it reads exactly like gold on a VLF metal detector. The miners had mentioned problems with hot rocks. I didn't even know the things existed running the Axiom, while the 24K was banging hard on every one of them. They would not ground balance out, and this one below reads a solid 56 on the 24K, a solid gold reading. No wonder the miners were not detecting. This place is a poster child for why a person needs a PI detector for some locations. This is not a common hot rock in most places, but is fairly common in the British Columbia gold belt of Canada. The location north of Anchorage is in the Petersville District. Graphitic slate from the Nome area OK, fine. I went ahead and took a few pans right off the clay layer, going for what I thought was the best stuff based on the nuggets the Axiom was finding. My first pan was one of the best I have panned in a very long time; I'm guessing close to 1/10th ounce of gold! Very rich material. I panned a couple more pans, then decided I'd leave it be for the miners. They needed to come back and mine the rest of this location after it fully thawed. I later talked to them about it, showed them what I was finding, and they are going to do just that. I scouted along the edge of the cut some more, and found more exposures of the layer in various locations, and found a few more nice nuggets in it. Another good day with over 1/4 oz of gold found, including 6.6 grams of small gold found with the pan. I was leaving very early the next morning to catch the noon flight out of Nome, soI cleaned everything up and met with the miners. They were quite appreciative of the information, both on the results in the old tailing piles, and the virgin pay layer left yet to mine. That, and finding out they needed to get an Axiom ASAP. The largest 10 gram nugget stayed with the miners, and putting the panned gold aside, I ended up with 1.16 Troy ounces found with the Axiom in three days. The dark stuff cleaned up well after a few days in both 1% HF Whink, and oxalic acid. 1.48 ounces total gold found. Not bad at all, and I may very well visit this location again some day, when I have more time to spend. Though I am happy I left when it did - it started raining that night, and kept it up hard the day I departed. Many thanks to my hosts, and to Garrett, for helping make the connections, that made this all possible. Gold found detecting and panning by Steve near Nome, Alaska 1.16 Troy ounces found by Steve with Axiom, after 10 gram nugget left with miners
    63 points
  2. Day 4 of detecting down under. I started the day running the big dog Z7000 with 18x12 XCOIL. Running High Yield/Difficult kicked a lot of hotrocks and no gold. I switched to the 17 Concentric coil and it ran really smooth in HY/Difficult, untroubled by hotrocks, but no gold. After I took a break and rested my back, I broke out the gold killer, 6000 with 14x9 Coiltek. I started finding tiny bits at remarkable depth with that machine. I worked the fringes to stay out of the hotrocks and found 18 bits for the day. Nothing big. All the big stuff has done been got, all that is left are the crumbs. Clearly you can't expect to find big gold if you're sticking to the same known patches, but it's early yet. Couple weeks to go, maybe some blue sky exploration to find that dream patch. Photo 1 is yesterday's finds Photo 2 is day 1 and 2 Photo 3 is today's bits
    29 points
  3. Hey Guys, Well I'm not sure if it's just un-motivation, heat, humidity or what, but it's been a slow summer prospecting for me to say the least. Prior to the summer, up to about May-June a partner and myself were still out hitting the goldfields religiously. I put down the GPZ 7000 for a bit and wanted to give the Minelab GPX 6000 some time, so that is just want I did prior to Summer rolling in. In just a month or so on the weekends I rounded up a nice little batch of nuggets, roughly 1.66 ounces, mostly smaller gold. I was getting really adjusted to the lightweight unit and its ability to find small gold really well. Well, now its summer, heat up to 110-115 plus high humidity, my interested drastically dropped. I have been out a few early mornings before the Sun popped up hitting some new spots in hots for a new location or patch. I found 3 lonely nuggets in 3 new locations, really thought one of them would pan out into a good spot. I couldn't tell you how many lonely nuggets I have found over the years in new washes, benches or hillsides where I spent the rest of the day thinking I was onto something. Many of the spots over the years I have returned thinking I must have missed something or just overlooked the obvious ... NOPE just not there (or within detector capability to find). I'm excited for the cool weather to roll upon us soon. There's a lot of new stuff to play with, including the new Garrett Axiom metal detector, Coiltek GoldHawk coils for the GPX 6000, Nugget Finder coils for GPX 6000 (coming soon), along with the Nugget Finder 17" Elliptical for the GPZ 7000. We carry all of these items for anyone that might be looking at some point, look us up if you don't have a source already. Here are a few pictures of some of the gold I rounded up, nothing to write home about, but it still gets the "Gold Bug" biting. P.S. I remember an old prospecting buddy, now passed once saying "Every Summer as you get older gets worse!" I think I'm starting to understand more as I get older, the Summer seem longer and hotter, maybe it's just comes with age .... Keep the coils swinging, Rob Rob's Detector Sales
    29 points
  4. My favorite nugget is the one I gave away. I used to own a pay-to-mine operation at Moore Creek, Alaska. We hosted visitors from all over the world who could search our tailing piles for large gold nuggets. It was a very successful operation, and I met a lot of great people. We had a repeat customer from Poland, Krys, really great guy. But could not find gold to save his life. Horrible coil control, often 4” or more off the ground, and no amount of coaching seemed able to change his ways. He never complained though. For him, the remote Alaska experience itself was more than enough. I went out in the evenings and found nuggets myself, all of which is used to make sure people having no luck went home with gold. We held a planted hunt at the end of each week with the gold I found, and only those who found no gold in the week were in the hunt. Nobody ever went home without some gold. It was like the third time Krys had visited, with no gold found yet again. I went out that evening and banged a 1.25 oz specimen piece. I wandered into camp late, and Krys and some others were sharing the huge bottles of Polish vodka he brought each year. I stood and listened a bit, and asked Krys if he had found any gold that day. He said no, with his typical cheerful smile. So I walked over and dropped that specimen in his shirt pocket, and said “here, this one found you.” The guy was astounded and very touched. It was a very fun moment, worth far more to that specimen to me by far. It was those moments that made Moore Creek a high point in my life. We had so many people who had never found gold before make their first find there, and it really lights people up. Really good times. I think seeing a newbie find their first nugget is more fun for me now than me finding yet another nugget. It reminds me just how special what we do is, and how few people will ever get the experience of finding a real gold nugget in the wild.
    28 points
  5. No, I did not go to the AKAU operation. I know the owners, but have never been there. KG and Ringy are long time detectorists who are sponsored by Garrett. The marketing machines these days focus very much on social media like YouTube and Facebook, and that is where the marketing money gets directed. But you'd have to ask them about all that. Seem like nice guys to me, hope to meet them some day. I'm more like an independent consultant who works with various companies. My posts and my stories are my own. If I was part of the marketing machine, I'd be making YouTube videos and posting on Facebook, but chasing eyeballs is not my motivation in all this. For me it is about having some relevance, in nudging and pushing companies to produce better technology, ultimately for my own use. I share stuff on these forums exclusively, and whether anyone pays any attention to it or not does not keep me up at night. It's more like how I keep a diary of my activities for myself, and I am very glad I have. My Steve's Mining Journal is something I will treasure as I enter my latter years, with memories that will have faded with time, had I not recorded each of them over the years right after they occurred. There is a lot about Axiom on this forum because I own this forum, and have an inside track on the Axiom. I invited Gerry to be a part of all that also, and as he is an active poster here, you get a double helping. Other prospecting forums are generally Minelab centric, and so Garrett gets little in the way of open minded discussion. Rest easy about one thing though. I could care less if you or anyone spends their money on metal detectors. I'm happy to share what I know, as honestly as I can, but I'm 100% not doing any of this to sell you metal detectors. If that was true, I'd be a dealer still. Had enough of that. The reality is I'm selfish and self centered, and do all this for my own enjoyment and satisfaction. I'm a very fortunate soul, to be able to do what I love, to be involved in it to a degree most can only dream of, and have a heck of a good time while doing it! Anyway, long story short is Garrett knew nothing about my posting here about this. It is as much a surprise for them as anyone, and I only just told them about it this morning. They might link here from their Facebook page, but that's up to them. I'm sure they'd rather I was doing all this on Facebook, but oh well, I march to my own drummer. Last thing I need are a million "friends," not one of whom is a real friend!
    28 points
  6. Today finishes 1 week of detecting. We're still detecting the same patch and getting some gold every day. There are literally hundreds of dig holes on this patch, so we're trying to concentrate on deeper zones with the Xcoil Concentric. I ran the big 17" just as hot as I could in High Yield/Difficult. Fortunately, the Concentric runs pretty quiet in the hotrocks, but it's still a lot of audio to endure. I burned out after 6 hrs, but it was the most productive day so far. The tiny nuggets were killing me with pinpointing and hole size so after I had the hole opened up, I started using the 6000 as a pinpointer. The nuggets we're chasing are just out of range for the 6000. 1 more day on this patch then off to greener pastures. We're going to leave gold to find gold I think. 2 days of photos, I'm closing in on half oz. Biggest 1.87 gram
    27 points
  7. Went up to a local beach today hoping the jellyfish would be gone so I could finally water hunt there. Nope. Water was loaded with "stinging nettles" a jellyfish common in the Potomac and Chesapeake Bay. Some say they don't sting, but the poor screaming kid I helped today with white vinegar would beg to differ. I'm no stranger to pain but I don't want to get it the stupid way. 😀 I also saw a dead ray: They put up one heck of a fight when you catch them. Got there early, but immediately got some Intel from a local that an old couple had hit the place pretty hard, he told me where they were and what parts of the beach they hunted. Sounded like the couple Jamie and I met at VA Beach on Sunday, he said he comes to this beach. Undeterred, I hunted the waterline, the high tide line and the towel line. Today I had the D2 with a modified Beach Sensitive program where I stripped out all discrimination and lowered all filters. I wanted to try a "raw" setting that would hit on everything, as the Deus did not see a gold chain hunting last Sunday. I did pretty good for a hunted beach: 17 coins, oldest was probably 70s. At least I got more than one of everything, proving to me that my program was good. Trash was pretty bad, this is about 2/3ds of it, a guy offered to take some off me early on. Many of the items were sight picks. I can't leave anything I see behind. Then the day got strange, first I dug this gold plated hairpin with bling, my only jewelry of the day again restoring my faith in my settings. I would not have dug that. Next I went along the surf at a hotel, didn't find much but when I was coming back, I got a very strong 66, I thought "oh, one of the really nice pull tabs"... Nope. 1816 8 Maravedis Spanish coin, Ferdinand VII, Jubia mint I think. Looks like a "J" on the left side of the almost completely obliterated bust. The "8" is gone. Here is the reverse: Gotta love that ol' rugged cross. 😀 Not far from it I got a 62 and thought "nickel or generic pull tab"... Nope. 1916 Cuban Liberation 5 centavos, in great shape. Here's the other side: Why were these here? No corrosion, only pocket wear. The only explanation I have is that a visitor to this country dropped lucky coins. They're lucky for me now thanks! Then I found this: A large old hem weight. 🤪 The kind of stuff I find relic hunting. After that when coming back I ran into a couple whose boy was out trying out his new metal detector (a cheap Chinese knockoff that looked like a Garrett), he had his coil on backwards. 😵 I went up to his Dad and asked him to call him over and we got him straightened out. I showed him my crazy finds, and gave him some quick tips on hunting, basically dig it all with a beep dig machine. Told them to let him detect their yard, and try to get him a farm permission, and to check metal detecting laws wherever they go. I also showed him how to properly swing the machine, and to not worry for a long time if all he gets is junk. I let him have the rest of that beach. I was paying for parking so I had to go. Odd day but very satisfying. 🙂
    27 points
  8. Hi there, It was fathers day recently here in New Zealand and as my wife and I have a habit of getting a day to do what we wish on mothers / fathers day I chose to go detecting. Area of choice this time was a somewhat remote but relatively well detected area. As I'd only fairly recently (in the last year) come to get to grips with my equinox 800 I thought I might be able to produce something with it. My good friend accompanied me on this trip and when we arrived to our chosen river after a 3hr journey from home he set about sniping in a bedrock area where we'd found some gold previously. I also had a bit of a snipe but it wasn't too far above freezing so I decided to go detecting. If found about 4 micro nuggets / flakes in the first 10 minutes. Then I crossed the river to the next area of bedrock and got another small piece in a crevice that led under some gravel and boulders in a likely drop on bedrock. I decided on a hunch to clear a little of this material off the crevice and detected it again. Another target was uncovered straight away. This target actually was the start of a concentration of a few dozen tiny pieces along a 1m long shallow crevice. Took me a couple of hours to get get it all out. Thi is what I got from there, maybe 6 grams. After the success from that crevice I found another similar bedrock situation close by and got another couple of grams or so from that. This was a lot more than my friend found sniping in the same time, and I was warm and dry! The rest of the day we sniped and detected various areas and the equinox steadily found small flakey nuggets and my friend got some slightly larger bits and pieces from his sniping. All in all a very enjoyable father's day with a respectable total of 14.9g between us for the day
    27 points
  9. I got a call the other day from a very dear friend of mine. We go back over 30 years. He's part owner of a 500 acre duck club here in the Delta. Mike who is the head honcho of the club was brushing a couple of the blinds as duck season is only a few weeks away. At some point he noticed his wedding ring was missing. Frantic he searched all over for it but you know how that goes. I was able to get out there yesterday...4 days after the fact. They drive me out in the side by side to one of the two spots that it could have been lost. Turn on the detector do a quick noise cancel then ground balance and start making my way around the outside of the blind. Took about 4 minutes to locate the ring a solid 14 on the Nox. The best and funniest part was when Mike yelled out "I cant believe you found it" Then my buddy gets all excited and tells him "you see I told you he knows what he's doing" lol Mike sends his wife of over 40 years the picture of the ring and boy did she sound happy. I found out afterwards that he had someone else out there with a detector right after he lost it but no luck. I can see how some of you ring finders get a kick out of this stuff...sorry for the crappy photos my friend needs a better phone lol strick
    26 points
  10. Military Relic hunting is probably my favorite type of metal detecting. The thrill of doing the research and then actually finding the long lost camps gives me a felling I just can't explain. But I thought I would share a few pictures and thoughts about a few relics hunts I did this year. I have kind of held off with a public post and will not be able to share any video at this time as we are still doing a bunch of research and don't want to chance giving away the location. Although the main part of this camp location is known, many smaller unit camps have not been located until now. The fact that these camps are located on farm fields only allow us to hunt during certain times of the year, Spring and Fall. Also, many years of hunting deer, elk, rabbits, etc. make it even more challenging sifting through all the generations of modern spent cartridges. First hunt in the Spring of this year was in the infantry camp and we are probably only on the edge with the whole camp still left to hunt. The $2 1/2 gold coin was found 30 minutes into the hunt down by a small creek. Here are a few of my pictures from the 5 hour hunt this Spring. First Hunt this Fall gave up some more good relics. This time in the Dragoons Camp. The $1 gold coin was actually the first signal I dug and was 20 feet from my truck on a freshly graded road. We will be hunting more in the coming weeks until the weather turns and ground is frozen. By November we will have to give it up until Spring. I will be doing a bunch more research through the Winter and hopefully be able to find the location of more camps they used for the few weeks they were camped in this location. I will be giving the landowner $1 gold coin next week in a display case we make up for them. I feel like it's the least I can do for them allowing us to hunt the property.
    26 points
  11. Australia gets all the glory and headlines for big gold and well earned. But what about our fine "Silver State" (yes Nevada is called the silver state), do we have big gold? My personal best solid nugget is 3/4 ozt so nothing compared to others I've seen. Now you want to talk about some of my friends and or customers finds and they go up into the multi ounces. 6 oz in the middle. Nevada is also known for some really good specimen gold. My PB is this about a 1 pounder (a mouthful). I've seen some whoppers much better and better though. Below is a boulder of 80 pound. And they were deep too. Found using either a 20" or a 25" coil, I can't remember. There has also been a few really nice patches found by my guys and I was lucky enough to get a few pics. Would enjoy seeing others pics and or stories.
    25 points
  12. I was with my family on vacation in the Sierras in a town called Downieville. I brought my detector, but quickly found out almost every bit of the Yuba River is a claim. I met a guy in town they called "Too Tall Tim", and he told me to go ahead and tell the guys I was his guest. The local area was claimed by a group called Comstock. I didn't really want to detect the river, as I could see that the guest pass didn't fly with everyone. I tried to communicate that I was actually looking for dropped jewelry, or coins, and relics, but swinging an Equinox 800 with a small coil, had people doubting that truth. We took a day trip up to a place with two lakes, and plenty of swimming. I detected around the swimming area for a while, and besides clad change, came up with a small lead toy soldier. I decided to try around the edge of the second lake, and found this gold crown for a tooth. I was in Gold 1, Recovery Speed 7, Iron Bias 0, and manually ground balanced. It came up like an older pulltab between 16-18 on the VDI, and was only about an inch down. So I did find some gold, but it wasn't what I expected by a long shot. I showed Tim, and the other fellas in town, who were greatly amused that the guy who wasn't a prospector, came up with a bit of gold. I'll definitely be joining the club so I can do a little more searching around the river, and hopefully recover some more cool finds. I'd love to get into prospecting at some point, so a membership with them, as well as the GPAA may be a good start! I wonder how that crown ended up there without the tooth. It looks old, but I'm no expert on dental history.
    25 points
  13. One of my favorites: 85 Grams One of my wife's favorites: 32 grams
    25 points
  14. Got out for the weekend in search of more Military Camp sites off the main site we located a while back. Meet with the property owners and presented them with a display case that included the $1 gold coin I found. They were very surprised and happy to have it to display in their home located on the property. They had a 10 year old grand daughter visiting and wanted to know if it was all right if she tagged along for a few hours while we metal detected and of course we agreed. They got out a Ricomax metal detector for her to use and after finding some batteries for it we headed out. It didn't take long for us and her to realize that the Ricomax wasn't going to cut it. So she followed us around and took turns swinging one of our metal detectors from time to time and found a few relics of her own. Needless to say she was hooked and after she went back to the house for quick sandwich, begged grandma to come back out and metal detect some more. She was a joy to have around and it was good to see a young girl so interested in the hobby. After a hard day of hunting the property owners surprised us with a BBQ dinner and we sat and talked about life and politics for the remainder of the night. We arrived back the next day and of course the little girl was ready to go back out with us until she had to leave for a cousin's birthday party. Needless to say the weekend was a success. Below are my finds, you can times that by 3 and see we had a great hunt. Some of the highlights of the hunt were Eagle A, Eagle I and Eagle R buttons, j hooks, multiple cal bullets including .52 Sharps, .69, .58 and .54 minie balls, a 1857 dime and 1851 3 cent piece. We won't be getting back to that location until next Spring. In the mean time we'll be doing more research in hopes of locating more camp sites.
    24 points
  15. I'm off to OZ on Sat to meet a fellow (but silent) forum member. Our plans included forum member Tony from Perth, but it seems he's been recalled halfway to the Goldfields. I won't actually get to the Goldfields until Wed which gives me about 3 weeks of detecting. I'm packing both the GPX 6000 and GPZ. I've got the new Coiltek 14x9 for the 6k and 3 XCoils for the Z. Looks like I'll miss NursePaul, he'll be about 300k further away. It's been tough to pack for this trip, airlines charge an extra $100 for a 2nd bag and the Skipper flight to the Goldfields charges $8.00 a lb for baggage over 35lbs. I've got the main checked bag down to 40lbs and my carryon at about 15 lbs. Bare minimums, 2 pr of underwear should be sufficient, amirite? I'm an old wildland firefighter, so 8 prs of merino wool hiking socks are a necessity. I don't want to travel halfway around the world and get caught up with blisters or a fungus on my feets. I'll check in periodically with some results and commentary on detector/coil selection. Tally Ho
    24 points
  16. I probably miss more gold than I find. The key is being on good ground, usually sites with proven past production, and putting in the hours. I was on good ground. I'm not some kind of tuning wizard either. In general though, when I put my mind to it, I have good technique. The real secret is coil control - getting the coil directly over the gold. People obsess over having detectors that get another inch, then give that inch or more away though sloppy coil control. Be willing to roll rocks, and more, to get the coil closer to the gold. You also want to have a good ear for the faint targets, which many people seem to lack. People pass by targets all the time, due to just not hearing those tiniest of signals. If your pouch does not have a decent helping of small targets on a regular basis, like birdshot or small scraps of brass, then you are passing over gold. If you can’t hear tiny bits, you also can’t hear big ones at the edge of detection depth. It’s all the same - really faint targets. Anyway, I hunt behind the countless others who have hunted the locations that I frequent, and I am sure people can hunt after me also and find gold. Nobody gets it all, though the finds certainly thin with time. Most people simply want more gold per hour than most places will deliver these days. Patience is another strong factor when it comes to metal detecting for gold. I never pay attention to a location having dig holes unless to think that means there is gold there. It amazes me how many people think an area is not worth attention because "it's already been hunted." As long as a single target remains in trashy areas, then gold remains. In that regard, I consider trash to be my friend, and I think the best prospects we have left today in the U.S. are in some of the trashiest locations. The trash drives the more timid away in search of easier digging, leaving good finds behind for those willing to dig every target, no matter how long it takes. And it might take years. Good ground plus hours (patience) Good, properly tuned detector Proper coil control - get coil close to gold Ear for small (faint) targets (a big nugget deep is a faint target) Willingness to dig trash More patience Some knowledge of geology can help in deciding what to detect first, but in general the beauty of metal detecting is the ease with which you can detect anything. Rather than think too much about the pile of dirt, just go detect it. Gold gets found in plenty of places you would think it should not be. Old mine workings in particular, that odd pile of dirt, the berm of the road, the road itself… it all can produce gold. They were excavating and moving dirt around, and over time more than once, so you have no idea what might end up where. Be curious, and give it a go, and see what you find. A little luck is helpful, but by and large when it comes to metal detecting for gold, people make their own luck.
    24 points
  17. It's been hard going in the ring recovery business for a while.. It hasn't helped that our local council has dumped about a metre of sand on top of the island's most productive beaches to counter erosion.. Despite the school holidays and a major surf lifesaving carnival last week, I'm only finding a few freshly dropped coins.. All this changed this morning when a gentleman contacted me on my ring recovery Facebook page with a very accurate description of where he lost his wedding ring.. Although I had to go for a scuba dive to recover it, the ring was exactly where he said he dropped it.. Using my trusty PulseDive it took about half a minute to find it.. He was a very happy fella and gave me a $50 reward.. Not too bad for less than a minute's work..
    23 points
  18. We had a storm come through N Calif over the weekend. The winds were SE and I had a great spot in mind but had to work Mon and Tues...Yesterday my first appt was at 12:30 so I figured I could get at least 2 and a half hours in.... when I got to the beach it was pretty much what I expected it was about 2/3 sanded back in but the storm 3 days earlier had done its job and there were still lots of targets. I hate to leave a target rich environment that’s exactly what happened as I only hunted from 8:30 till 11:00. The bracelet is stamped 14 k and is 5.4 grams. Equinox 800 field 2 5 tones ground tracking on Fe0 Fe2 0 Coiltex 10x5 strick
    23 points
  19. 7.5 oz before acid, a out 25grams fell off during the clean, final clean weight was 5.3 oz. Happy fella. Was by my self, no one to share the excitement with, also found a 1.44 oz bit and another 16 grams same day.
    23 points
  20. Gooseberries & Gold. Went out scouting for some Gooseberries and Elderberries to make jelly. The gravels looked really good in the area for detecting, so I broke out the detector for a few hours and got a few small nuggets.
    23 points
  21. I've been reimmersed in metal detecting for about 3 years now and sometimes I still feel like a beginner, specially when I see some of the amazing and mind-blowing finds that other more experienced detectorists make. Now I've found some cool things, but I always feel like I still have a long way to go to get to the next level. At first I thought it was the machine so I got two of the nicest machines I could afford. I quickly learned it was not the machines. Then I thought, well it must just be me, so I deep-dived into each machine I had and tried to learn all the ins and out I could and detected evey chance I got. I'm still learning, but I feel much more comfortable with my machines than ever, so I thought well maybe it's not me. Normally, I plod around in my local parks close to me to detect which were mostly built in the 1980s, so there's a limited amount and date range of articles to be found there. Fortunately, this year I've been able to go to some historic locations to detect and have found some amazing things and have begun to realize, as Realtors say, it's all about location, location, location. I was recently lamenting to one of my much more experienced detecting friends, saying how I envied him for his experience and all the wonderful things he has found. I had FE (Finds Envy). To my surprise, he said he envied me! I couldn't even image why. He said that he saw how excited I got everytime I found something that I had never found before and that I was getting to experience my "firsts" of so many finds to come. He said that all of his firsts were behind him now and he missed getting that level of excitement out of each find. That put everything in perspective for me and I remembered that I got into metal detecting for fun of being outdoors, going to new places, and the thrill of possibly finding something new or long lost. This put me back on the path and empowered me to ask for my first permission. I have driven my a large church in my area several times on my way to detect in nearby parks. A few days ago I noticed they had a carnival set up on their grounds and had rides, booths, food, a beer tent, and concerts going on. So on the day after the event ended I decided to go see if I could get permission to detect the carnival grounds. As my father used to say, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained". I went into the church office asked the manager if it would be okay to detect the carnival area. Imagine my amazement when he replied, "Sure that's fine just be careful around the large equipment". He then asked if would mind looking for a lost necklace while I was out there that a family had reported to them. I told him that I'd be happy to. As I got out to the field, all of the rides and heavy equipment had been trucked away, leaving a clear field of play. I fired up the Deus II and began the search. I started hitting good signals right away and cleared a whole lot of trash in the process. I gridded the area of the rides as that was supposed to be where the necklace was lost. As I took a short lunch break, the manager came out and told me that there had been other activities in the grassy areas and I should check those as well. So after clearing the carnival area, I searched all the lawn areas as well. By the end of the hunt, I could feel the weight of my pouch which was unusually heavy. Unfortunately, I didn't find the lost necklace, but I did find over 90 coins and tokens, some junk jewelry, and a nice Stainless Steel ring. I showed my finds to the office manager and he was amazed at the amount of stuff I found and trash that I cleared and I gave him the ring in case he could find the owner. He was most appreciative and said that the next time they had an outdoor event, he would ask me back to search the grounds again. So while my finds were nothing extraordinary, my FE (Finds Envy) has turned to FP (Full Pouch) and I'm good with that! 😎 Some of the unsorted trash... Some of the more ineresting trash... That D2 sure loves round objects!
    22 points
  22. JW and I went for a bit of a gold hunt a couple of days ago, he managed to do well considering the area we were in and found three pieces, two of which were decent size. JW used the 15" Concentric coil on the GPZ as he was hoping for some deeper gold in the deeper ground. I was in the mood for exploring around and having some good ground coverage so I used the 12" Spiral coil rather than my usual smaller coils also on my GPZ, although this area is quite suitable for larger coils with minimal obstacles to cause problems. Here is JW's gold for the day. 0.70 of a gram. I didn't do near as good but in fact we were both pretty surprised to get anything where we were so we can't complain and at least it means there is gold there to be found, although a lot of it probably disguised as pellets 🙂 I think my focus was too much on smaller targets as I spent a lot of time digging and recovering pellets. The 12" spiral gives the typical good double blip on small shallow targets so surface pellets are easy to ignore but if they live past a scrape or two I tend to recover them just in case but the 12" can give a double blip on quite deep little pellets. I think in this case I probably should have ignored the double blips entirely and aimed for the deeper targets and not wasted so much time on the pellets 🙂 And this was ignoring the surface first scrape or two pellets so really, I ignored 3 times as many pellets as I recovered, at least. My only nugget of the day, better than a skunk! It was down a few inches. It sure wasted a lot of my time that was probably better spent looking for bigger deeper stuff, but then I may have had a skunk as the one piece of gold I did get could have easily been dismissed for a pellet. That's the advantage to less sensitive detectors and coils I guess, they fly blind over a bulk of the pellets, but often miss the smaller gold too. JW being smarter seemed to deal with the pellets a lot better than I did, he didn't get too many at all, and got more gold so his method clearly worked better. If anyone has suggestions for dealing with spots like this loaded with pellets that potentially have gold that would be helpful, probably a less sensitive coil would be a good start I guess. On the plus side, I'm helping clean the lead out of the environment.
    22 points
  23. So this morn I jump in the PU, batteries, coffee, coffee cup, gold vile, lunch, smokes, lighter, glasses, full tank...all good to go! Get 3/4 of the way to my diggings and realize I'm still wearing my f'n slippers! Almost turned around but thought WTF lets give it a shot?...lol. Pulled it off and dig 10-12 (?) itty bitties but it sure wasn't smooth going. If you have dementia creeping in don't forget to check your footwear BEFORE you leave the shack.....
    21 points
  24. Prep work for the hurricane is finished, so what else to do? That's right, go detecting! I decided to go back to the 15" on the Equinox vs. the 10x5 today while detecting the local ball field. The sandy soil was already wet, so it was allowing me to reach down and touch some older coins. 2 silver dimes that were each 11" down and 2 wheaties that were not as deep. The silvers jumped down into the mid twenties and went as high as 33 and gave an iron tone a couple times. It felt good to swing the big coil again...so deep and awesome coverage! Now the wait is on to see what becomes of the storm. Praying all is okay for everyone. 15", Park 1, 50 tones, all metal, 4 recovery, up to 24 sensitivity
    21 points
  25. Years ago at this same spot we had used the 5000's to collect a few of the more solid specimens. We then found even more with the VLF's. Then I came back with the Garrett Axiom, as I knew the site had many Hot Rocks. The VLF's missed this specimen as it was right under a big hot rock. Power of the Pulse Induction Axiom to be able to ignore the hot rock and get the specimen. Some PI's can ignore Hot Rocks and find gold nuggets because the nuggets are solid. Most PI's can't do the same under a large Hot Rock and still find some of the gold specimens. Chalk one more up for the Axiom Metal Detector's technology.
    21 points
  26. 39.2 ounces raw, 31.2ounces after acid bath @ 96% pure. Found with GPZ14 in July 2015.
    21 points
  27. Thanks Simon. People will no doubt say "such and such a machine would have found that gold also." Perhaps, but that misses the point really. Which is that the Garrett Axiom is a very capable nugget detector, and a real pleasure to use. Some might wonder why I was not running a larger coil. Well, I just love that little 11" mono. The machine balances perfectly with it, and is an easy swing in the worst of terrain. The 7" width gets it into tight nooks and crannies. I had limited time and no lack of targets, and frankly, punching deeper into really nasty clay is not all it's cracked up to be either. So I used the 7" x 11" mono exclusively on this trip.
    21 points
  28. Yesterday I decided to go to a field near a small town where I have already been a few times . The soil is sandy and moderately mineralized , it is very easy to dig here I like this area .. I will use always the same settings for the Deus2 , SENSITIVE 5 TONES , SQUARE audio . This is the best mode for my kind of hunting and I am experienced with it now .. First signal and first coin , a Double Tournois from Henri IIII , 1598 ... A good start .. A little corroded but a nice find. A few minutes later , an other old coin , but this one is both worn and damaged . But this is interesting because both coins have been found in a relatively small area and I decide to stay in this area instead of going further in the field like I did the previous times .. As usual I find 1st WW trash , schrappnells , bullets , casings etc ... Detecting over here requires patience because of all this modern trash . Now I have a medium tone clean signal , it takes a little time to locate the target because it is a thin one ... Wow its a silver , a very old silver , a Carolingian coin dating from the 9th century !!! . 😺✌️ 💥 🤣 Bad luck the coin is damaged and unfortunately breaks when I try to clean it . I am not surprised because these coins ( around 1,5g ) are very thin and fragile . Anyway what a find .. Awesome... I have only found 2 of them during 23 years of detection , this is my 3rd Carolingian coin 🙃👌... I like these coins , and it is difficult to imagine that this one has been waiting during 1200 years before bringing back to life ... I will spend one more hour in the field , with more classical finds but nothing as spectacular as this silver coin. Btw I have tried DEEP HC a few minutes but I found it a little too slow for detecting in this field with all this iron trash. A few pics : The field : A denier tournois , Henri IIII , 1598 : The Carolingian coin : A medieval coin weight : A few neighbours 🙂: End of the day , time to go back home : The Carolingian coin after cleaning , Denier , Louis 1er Le Pieux , 814-840 , HLUDOVICUSIMP XPISTIANARELIGIO Thanks to my trusty Deus2 WS6 .. 🙂 :
    20 points
  29. N° 2 and N° 4 Grandkids wanted to do a bushwalk with me so I took them to the start of the Australian Alps Walking Track as we only had my vehicle it had to be a there and back exercise from Walhalla to the Thomson River and back. The Australian Alps Walking Track is a long distance walking trail through the alpine areas of Victoria, New South Wales and ACT. It is 655 km long, starting at Walhalla (a historical gold field), Victoria and running through to Canberra. The track goes mainly though Australian national parks It ascends many peaks including Mount Kosciuszko, Mount Bogong, and Bimberi Peak. To walk the whole trail can take between 5 to 8 weeks. Now the boys insist on doing the next section to the STEEL BRIDGE as soon as time permits. The history of the track.
    20 points
  30. Here is a finds of the month picture!
    20 points
  31. Friday night I got out to what I was hoping would be a great night of detecting ... but I had my doubts. My doubts were based upon the direction of the hurricane. It was approaching Los Angeles from the S and SSE which isn't a great swell maker. I managed to get out before the low tide and I put in an all nighter (8 hours) on a favorite beach and a beach oriented to take maximum advantage of the storm direction. The waves were really pretty small. I managed one silver ring and one silver bracelet. My favorite beach produced 5 rings including the silver and two chains. My 'opportunity beach' which has produced some good jewelry in the past had very little for me on Saturday morning. It was still an enjoyable night with the clouds and spritzes of rain to break up the heat.
    20 points
  32. OK everybody.... let's see your favorite nugget that YOU found with your detector. Doesn't have to be biggest, etc. but your personal favorite? Maybe it's your biggest, or string gold, chevron type, or some character? Only one nugget, your favorite. Here's mine from Notellem creek.....
    20 points
  33. Yesterday I scooted over to a park for a mainly gold hunt. I was running the 800 and have been playing with single freq. setups. I only had an hour or so to dig so I made the best of it (kinda). Nothing annoys me more than digging junk but it's the rule if you want the gold. The first batch of targets were foil, foil and more FOIL. I hit up on some clad and a piece of baby spoon. I got another foil tone Ha Ha and figured I would enjoy digging another beverage seal. Well low and behold , looky here. The shape looked familiar but could it be, is it a ring??. Yup. Sadly the stone is missing from my find but its been a while since I found a 14k ring. This is only the 3rd 14k white gold ring I've ever found. For a quick 1 1/2 hour hunt I was more than happy.
    19 points
  34. After my Job interview went south, I went metal detecting , and I have another offer to rake some leaves for extra cash , so I prayed that if i should do that leaf raking that God would give me a sighn and let me find a gold ring today, and I did. had to XP ORX set up in coin deep , 70 gain 6 disc and 2.5 sweep speed at 17.2khz and at the 1st spot i was hunting , I got the thinking I should take a break and then go to another spot I have been to many time but never found any rings . I found a big chunk of iron and after it was out i got a quarter Hit , other wise someone had dug the cladd out pretty good , I was finding lots of tabs and foil , thats a good sign a ring could in theory be in the ground , and I got a signal 62 on the meter and expecting a tab, up comes a nice Gold cladda ring , marked Ireland inside. and another mark i cant read its a bit worn , but its pretty clear its not bling or plated its small but still weighing in at 2.4 grams. In the last picture you can see the big iron bolt that i dug out and after that an old crusty quarter was heard , yes it was masked ,someone else had stripped all the clad so i was luckey to get that quarter , but it was clearly masked
    19 points
  35. I arrived in Perth with all luggage intact. Caught the Skipper flight to Leonora and my ride was waiting. We pitched camp between Leonora and Leinster and hit a well detected patch. The 6k and 14x9 Coiltek were awesome at sniffing out some incredibly tiny gold. I had 15 crumbs just shy of 2 grams. My partner had an extra half day of detecting and pulled close to 4 grams. We packed up to head north for some 40e spots we had logged. Unfortunately, my partner sprained his detecting wing while loading the truck. We've holed up in the lodge in Leinster, hoping for some mending time, however; we got some pointy fingers from forum members Gone Bush and Dave D. Their guidance produced another couple grams in the poke and we're just getting started. We could not have organized this adventure without our Aussie prospecting brothers on this forum. Bravo Zulu to Tony in Perth for storing our gear and helping us at every step. Bravo Zulu to Gone Bush and Dave D, for unselfishly giving us the pointy fingers to productive areas us poor Yanks might never find. I'll get some photos and nugget weights out tomorrow. I hear the beer time bell at the pub across the street. Don't want to be late for beer time. See you fukkas soon.
    19 points
  36. My buddy and claim partner got a hell of a nice score yesterday on our 2nd claim that we just purchased last week. Both of our claims have big gold.
    19 points
  37. Big for me 🙂 Being rough like that is quite rare, usually water worn smooth nuggets here.
    19 points
  38. I called it my Dragon Boat Nugget. I've found crystalline, dendritic, cubic, octahedral, wire, leaf, and every other type of nugget out there, but never one like this. I sold it back in 2015 for spot along with a lot of other unique gold because I needed gas money to get back home. Many regrets. If someone here bought it from the dealer I sold it to, I'll definitely buy it back for spot. 🙂
    19 points
  39. Usually after a vacation I schedule one day after my return home to ready myself for the return to work. After hunting with Bob at Virginia Beach I really wanted to go to a park I have murdered the silver at, But the lawn needed mowing. I told my wife my plans and she said why don't you go detecting for a bit the lawn can wait ( damn I married a good women). I have hit this place hard for two years, me and my buddy have pulled over 100+ silver coins not including rings and charms out of the ground. I packed up the Tesoro silver u-max and the 800 and off I went. I always use the Tesoro for clean up so figuring finds were getting harder to find I started with it first. Quarters and dimes were on the found list, but nothing tone wise that peaked my hearing. I decided to check a place close to the parking lot and my truck. After a 100 yards I got a tone that was a touch different. I would have dug it straight up but there was a strange guy walking back and forth. Not sure what he was up to, so I walked a few hundred yards away. At this point the big coil was killing me and I decided head to the truck and swap to the 800. I fired up the 800 and went to my park 1 5khz program. I did pretty well on some pocket change and decided to roll back to the spot where the Tesoro tagged a good tone. The 800 said 28-29 with a nice tone, I was sure it was silver, but I've been fooled before. Well after digging I pulled a silver ring, not a fancy one but I'll take it. I decided to take a run at the other side of the park but was thwarted by blood thirsty mosquitoes and I forgot the Permethrin. After 10 minutes and a 100 bites later I was gone. I figure I can always make another trip. Overall I had a nice 4 hour hunt.
    18 points
  40. Gerry, I'm not sure the weight on this one a friend found, but people were willing to pay multiple times spot for it's rarity. Northern Nevada Gold Bug 2 find.
    18 points
  41. I love Lawrie and most hard core detector engineers. Typically these folks are an engineer's engineer as they are squeezing so much juice out of a fundamentally crude physical principle used to interrogate the physical properties of a metal target - magnetic induction. Based on what these folks have been able to accomplish with so little to work with is almost miraculous. Yet most folks have little-to-no appreciation for what has been accompished and how much difficulty is involved with wringing a few more drops of capability out of these machines while essentially being on the flat top of the performance vs. cost/power/processing plateau. Also love all the "I can't talk about that" statements. I understand business sensitive information, having to keep the competive edge, and keeping the counterfeiters at bay, but being coy about whether or not ML is working on a pinpointer like it's some state secret is laugh out load funny. All I have to say is ML's technology rep took a big hit with the the head-scratchingly underwhelming Pro Find 35 PP. It would be nice to see them up their game in that area both in terms of tech, performance and features. To answer Lawrie's "market research" question, the answer is yes, people DO want a capable, reliable discriminating pinpointer at least as far as ferrous vs. non-ferrous is concerned. The more interesting question is whether people want something more sophisticated like a wired or even wireless X-Ray probe. I suspect there is not a whole lot of interest there on ML's part based on the ultimate profit margin for that accessory, which seems to be the primary force driving ML these days as they have the market cornered while everyone else is still playing catchup. I like what the interviewer did ask and Mark's answers when he could answer. Liked the wireless coil discussion counterpoint with mosty fair criticisms of wireless topology (except you can debate that splitting up the power sources a la XP enables distributing that power-to-weight disadvantage). And it was funny how Lawrie, not a marketeer, missed an opportunity to further subtly dis the competition (XP) when the interviewer had to tip in with the antenna wire claptrap disadvantage. I would have had Lawrie delve more into whether the secret sauce of Multi-IQ/Multi-IQ+ lies primarily in how the waveform is transmitted or the power of the real-time signal processing algorithms rather than talking about "100 khz". I would have asked the question differently, and would have tried to get Lawrie on record stating that the 40 khz single frequency setting does not represent or nor correlate to the upper end of the SMF spectrum of Multi-IQ+ (if true). Great opportunity to put that wide misconception to rest. Regarding upper frequencies, would like to get some confirmation on its small gold performance vs. Equinox. But I think the ML marketeers would rather keep pressing the "more power is good" message rather than these other arcane details related to Multi-IQ+ and Manticore because it implies "more depth" and that seems to be the overriding performance feature that is, unfortunately, front and center to most detectorists. Great video overall. So Lawrie said something interesting at the 15:40 mark about the Beast M105 phones utilizing a different low latency wireless "technology" than the GPX 6000's M100 wireless phones. I also noticed that ML is not utilizing the Bluetooth symbol on the Beast's screen (though they are still using the "+" symbol) like they did on the Equinox. I suspect they are still utilizing APTX-LL or perhaps APTX Adaptive (!!) but it was an interesting statement and the subtle change on the Beast's screen graphics, point to ML perhaps activating a built-in proprietary Wi-Max radio (ML's proprietary low latency wireless system) down the road if APTX-LL becomes unobtanium. Manticore on Left and Equinox on Right, FWIW Anyway, my takeaways so far on The Beast based on what we know or highly suspect: It will undoubtedly be a worthy successor to and an evolutionary step up from Equinox (whether it is actually a better "value" at the chosen price point is debatable). Pros: The Pros all generally appear to address the shortcomings with Equinox (and that's not to take away from how great the Nox was and is), including: Better Watertight Integrity Welcome User Interface Improvements (4-way navigation and shortcut keys) Like the unambiguous, site/objective-based mode/sub-mode designations Like the greater additional customized mode profile capability (implementation is still TBD, see below). More Visual ID Information with shapes/positions that give the user more visual target intel with better TID Resolution More sophisticated iron handling and discrimination is anticipated Better and more customizable Audio Options More Robust, Compact, and Lighter Stem and Shaft System Elliptical Small Coil Form Factor Option Fast Initialization (I think) and Noise Cancelling (I know). 1.5 ounces (46 grams) lighter than Equinox. The CF shaft/stem advantage basically countering the increased battery weight. Cons (these are mostly minor): Pricing and Value (seems like a lot to pay vs. NOX for what you are getting, but not too much different than Deus 2 vs. Deus 1) While robust, that new coil/shaft mechanical design will make life difficult for third party shaft and coil suppliers. That will likely translate into even fewer third party shaft/coil options than the few options Equinox had. Not so worried about the conservative battery session duration figures (9 hours is probably a minimum duration figure), but the fact that it takes 7 hours to recharge means that ML was unable (or unwilling) to utilize the USB-C power delivery standard capability to increase charging amps above 2.0A for the detector's battery charging system, perhaps due to the choice to go with their watertight magnetic charge cable connector interface. Well, at least the M105 headphones have a USB-C connector... That round/oval handgrip, though slightly improved(?) still seems too big compared to what Nokta offers on the Legend. Wish it had a mineralization indicator. Offering the same subpar/overpriced ML waterproof headphones as Nox (fortunately there are some excellent compatible 3rd party waterproof headphones out there). We'll See/TBD: What does the 50% more power statement really mean in terms of performance and capabilty/features. Lawrie confirmed that a different, possibly expanded SMF spectrum is utilized with Multi-IQ+ vs. Multi-IQ on Nox/Vanquish>how does this practically translate into performance? How is transmit power handled/managed in hot soil/black sand conditions across ALL modes/sub-modes? Automatically folded back like Nox in the beach modes only or is there a more sophisticated implementation and to what degree does the user have control? Iron Handling appears to be more sophisticated but to what degree? How does it handle highly mineralized ground? Confirmation that the modes/sub-modes utilized different Multi-IQ+ SMF spectra and signal processing or is it all just different signal processing implementations? Frankly, as a practical matter no one should really care as long as it suitably performs but this always seems to be a big area of discussion as well as being grossly misunderstood) and appears to drive sales amongst the subset of prospective buyers who have the faulty "more is better" (fill in the blank: "more power", "more frequencies used", "more frequency range", "more channels") frame of reference because they really don't fundamentally understand the underlying tech or how it should be implemented. How are the customized user profiles implemented and how easy is it to switch between them for the purpose of target interrogation? Confirmation of the wireless audio protocol(s) used. Is it as sensitive on tiny gold as Nox? EMI immunity should be better, but we'll see. Are the watertight and structural improvements going to make it a better submersible salt beach machine than Nox? More depth? (Frankly not all that important to me based on what/how I detect which is mostly about relics in a full range of mild to extremelyhot soil conditions) Looking forward to learning about The Beast's TBD known unknowns (mentioned above) as well as the unknown unknowns as more is revealed in the weeks and months to come. At the mentioned US Beast price point, this detector will eventually replace my Equinox unless it is revealed to have some egregious fatal flaw (close to zero chance of that). But I won't stand in line for this one and will wait for the hype to die down, the first one or two online SW updates to be released and field tested, and release of the small elliptical form factor coil. Then will likely buy a used unit from a dummy who is reselling it at a deep discount once they discovered that the Beast (like ALL detectors ) is not Harry Potter's Magic Detecting Wand. I predict Equinox itself (not Deus 2 or even Legend) will be the greatest drag on Manticore sales, so we'll see if Manticore used prices have the staying power of (pre-Manticore) Equinox used prices even in the early going. In the mean time...D2 will be my weapon of choice for relic/park/beach detecting, backed up by Equinox 10x5 or Legend and my GPX 4.8K (or Axiom) when a PI is needed to get the job done. Cheers, Chase
    18 points
  42. Actually our equialent is Wheaties, which has been around for a century. Early in their existance they got the idea of putting top athletes on the box, to garner more sales. (It worked.) When you made the Wheaties bpx, you knew you had arrived at the zenith! Here are a couple from this century even those of you at the bottom of the world should recognize:
    18 points
  43. Mother nature has a sense of humor!
    18 points
  44. That's two successful ring recoveries in a week.. If this keeps up I'll be able to retire a wealthy man.. It was another very easy recovery.. The lady who owns this ring send me a photo of the tree she was sitting under when she lost it.. Took about 2 minutes to find it.. If only all recovery jobs were this easy.. I've just send her a message to say I've found it but it's still early in the morning here (6:30) so no reply yet.. She told me this ring had a lot of sentimental value and there would be a reward if I found it.. I'll keep you posted..
    17 points
  45. It was time for a hunt ... but I've done that each of the last few nights. Last night's hunt was better on the counts but it came up a bit short on the value. The first ring of the night I thought was my best until the next morning. I was finally able to read a 14kt GF. Bummer. It came in as a 21 so I'm not too surprised. Some of the other rings. An odd mix. The one missing the 'stone' is silver. Here are more pictures of the loot. The bottom of the aluminum can above was found down over 20 inches. I hate those digs but they sound so good. I've also included some pictures of previous hunts just to show the difference in nights. This last tray includes 3 rings and of note was one of my best 'spoon rings' ever. What is a spoon ring you say? It was once a silver spoon that was chopped off at the end and shaped into a ring. Notice the overlapping design which would allow for some adjustment and expansion.
    17 points
  46. Found a five ounce piece in the morning and this ninety eight ounce lump in the afternoon. The Orange Roughie (Washington Nugget)
    17 points
  47. My favorite nugget, and favorite specimen gold. The nugget isn’t the prettiest, but I found it the summer I retired when out with Mike Bowers & some other Auburn Goldhounds…nice folks. It’s still my biggest I’ve found. The speci was found right here in Idaho a few miles from my cabin on a friend’s claim.😊
    17 points
  48. VLF just means Very Low Frequency and is not the real technology involved. That would be Induction Balance (IB) where current flow to the coil is continuous. It is also therefore called Continuous Wave by some companies. The detector constantly transmits and receives, and the phase based processing involved is called frequency domain processing. Pulse Induction (PI) is where the current to the coil shuts off periodically. There is a transmit portion, then a receive portion. The short time in between allows for induced currents to decay. They do so at different rates, and when this is measured, we call it time domain processing. Whether a detector is Induction Balance or Pulse Induction is a function of the electronics and how the current is flowing, continuously, or intermittently. It has nothing to do with processing. It is possible to do time measurements, time domain type processing, with an Induction Balance detector. As far as I know, it is not possible to do the reverse, to do phase type processing with a PI. This timed processing however does not make an Induction Balance detector into some kind of IB/PI hybrid. There are things inherent in a true PI, the high power pulse, followed by actual decay of eddy currents, that can't be duplicated in a continuous wave device, where the ground and targets are constantly illuminated. It may be a form of hybrid processing, but it is not a true melding of a PI with a IB detector, which is what people seem to think. This idea you will have a VLF with PI depths is just nonsense, and largely marketing BS aimed at people who do not know better. What is does offer is another way to get more information out of the IB signal, which in general means better discrimination at VLF type depths. Since the disc returns usually become less accurate before the actual full depth of a VLF (IB) machine is reached, any improvement in disc at depth is perceived by the end user as "more depth" in relative, but not absolute terms. The following document should be read and fully understood by everyone who wants to put these questions of what is what when it comes to the two basic techs we commonly deal with, IB or PI. How Metal Detectors Work by Mark Rowan & William Lahr - Originally published by White's Electronics as a booklet P/N 621-0395. Basic but rather technical information on how induction balance and pulse induction metal detectors work.
    17 points
  49. Gotta be the last nugget I found today. Always feel super blessed to find a pc of detectable gold. Going to be a great day!! Wishing you all more nuggets than bullets;))
    17 points
  50. I just put up the first of several videos on using the Axiom. I'll do some others on using it in the field, but this one is an introduction to the Axiom filmed mostly in the office.
    17 points
×
×
  • Create New...