Lunk

A Monster Month

33 posts in this topic


Well done and thank-you for sharing your experience.

 

It's impressive and seems fun to have. 

Hope many more finds with it. 

 

GoldEN 

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Nice report Lunk. Thanks & well done on the finds.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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Posted (edited)

Great write-up Lunk. 

After my experience today I know now I 'need' one of these. Very rich old mine with masses of football sized quartz chunks lying everywhere and great shallow gravels all around and targets, targets, targets, targets...and after the first 7 being junk I said ?$&( this and went somewhere else. 

I'm positive there is gold there but I don't have 10 years to get through the crap :sad:

Edited by Northeast
Bad grammar.
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Great write up, Lunkster!   Your being a truly "straight arrow" guy across the board, (not to diminish my respect for friend Steve Herschbach) I put great value in your comments and experience!   Your comments, along with those of Steve Herschbach only magnify my anxiousity (new word: derivation of anxiety and curiosity...) Thank you, for your comments!  I am now even more anxious to receive my own "Monster" in the near future!  C'mon MINELAB!

~Largo~

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 Thanks for the great report. My favorite part is the ears with a rabbit attached.

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Excellent report Lunk! I'm glad I decided to add the GM1000 to my arsenal....can't wait to get it and try it out on the tailing piles and lode mine gravels up by my cabin! Plus, it'll be a fun lightweight unit to use in the desert when taking a break from the zed. :-)

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Great report. It sounds like this newest addition to our nugget hunting arsenal is something that detectorists have been looking for all along. features like eliminating the hot rock, while still revealing the tiny bit of gold are a huge step up in detector technology.

This report really makes me wish I could step up from my ancient V-Sat, but alas, my wallet is way too thin. Thanks for a great, detailed report.

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I always look forward to your in-depth reviews Lunk. Between you, Steve and JP we amateurs get to make leaps in our experience without ever getting out of our chairs. Only half joking here. Thank you for taking the time to inform us.

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Congratulations on the meteorites Keith! Probably the first, most, largest and maybe the only ever found so far world wide with the Gold Monster 1000. Enjoy your place in the Guinness Book of World Records while it lasts!

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